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Dual Boot Windows Ten And Ubuntu 14. Easy To Do.


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 02:14 AM

As the title says  Dual Boot Windows Ten And Ubuntu 14. Easy To Do.
 
 

 

At the opening screen, you can choose to automatically upgrade to Windows 10

As I just got a new (Second hand) laptop with Windows 8.1 on it I decided why not. I chose the Upgrade option.
This is the laptop
Product description
I have the I5 with 4GiB of ram 500 GiB HDD.
 
 It had W8.1 so I factory reset it to get rid of the previous owner, When that was done I used the upgrade tool http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and now have WinX.
 
It was quite painless, the whole process took about 2 hours including updates and downloading Windows. So far my PC works as expected, Everything works, I had no issues with sound, video, or WifI, All work as expected.

 

 http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/584512/windows-10-is-out-and-available-immediately-via-the-windows-10-download-tool/
 

Remember to turn off fast boot on Windows 10, Its in control panel/ Power options.

 

Anyway on to the good bits.
 
Once Windows Ten was installed and all that Windows fuss. I inserted my Ubuntu 14.04 ISO ( please note the ISO was created with Brassero )into the DVD drive and rebooted. Once the PC rebooted I pressed F9 ( On my PC ) to select boot options.
On my PC I was presented with this screen.
photo(4).jpg

I selected the first option as shown in the screen shot. Look for CD/DVD Rom Drive ( UEFI ) and make it the first boot option. Hit enter save and exit.

 

Wait for PC to boot from DVD.

 

Installation.

There is no install Ubuntu along side Windows option, You will need to create a partition to install Ubuntu

 

IF YOU DO NOT DO THIS IT WILL OVERWRITE WINDOWS

6qxb9.png

Use Gparted to create a partition of about 20GiB.

When done format it as ext4. It should show up as sda4, You will know its the right one because it will be ext4 not ntfs.

Next set the flag as boot

 

 

Now go ahead and install Ubuntu When prompted by the installer select something else,

 

 

Now install to sda4 or what ever drive you just created, in the normal way, I put my boot loader on sda4 same as my Linux. Remember to be online while installing.

 

Once Ubuntu is installed, When prompted reboot. Remember to remove the installation disc from the drive and press enter.

Your PC should boot into Ubuntu, No Windows option.

To fix this. Open terminal and type.

sudo update-grub 

And reboot.

 

You should be presented with this screen. Please note that grub calls it Windows 8 loader. Select the Windows loader for Windows Ten and the top option for Ubuntu. and Enjoy.

photo%285%29.jpg


Edited by NickAu, 04 August 2015 - 05:12 AM.


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#2 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 02:17 AM

Thanks for sharing.

 

I've got the Windows 10 ISO, and downloaded the latests versions of all my programs, but I haven't upgraded my machines yet.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 02:49 AM

I've upgraded one PC (HP dc5800) a couple of weeks ago, as an Insider participant, got my Full license on the 19th. We were promised a treat for our efforts & we got it with an early license. 

 

Cleaned installed to SSD afterwards, extracting the ISO with the ESD to ISO tool. By then, it was time for a clean install, there was the base Windows 7 Home Premium one, then at least 5 upgrades, possibly 6, all attempts at cloning to the SSD failed & maybe that was a good thing. 

 

Used the new COA provided by Speccy for the clean install, which was different from the Windows 7 one. 

 

Haven't installed Linux yet on this machine because there's a BIOS setting to be found to install a UNIX system. Have never seen this before at all until recently. I suppose because it's a decommissioned business PC & the settings are geared more for those users, rather than consumers. I'll go as far to say, Windows 10 runs well on this PC, equipped with a 3.0GHz Core2Duo (E8400) & faster than Windows 7. 

 

Am hoping to get Linux Mint installed on it soon. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 gigawert

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 03:23 PM

I wrote my own tutorial on this too in May, except for Windows 7. It still applies, though. 


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#5 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 03:49 PM

@gigawert

 


You are looking at the computer this entire site is hosted on.

- REF: http://69.107.89.192/

 

Cool.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 03 August 2015 - 03:15 AM

I wrote my own tutorial on this too in May, except for Windows 7. It still applies, though. 

 

Great site, gigawart! :thumbup2:

 

Especially considering you're hosting in on a 32GiB microSD card via a Raspberry Pi. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 gigawert

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Posted 03 August 2015 - 09:42 AM

 

I wrote my own tutorial on this too in May, except for Windows 7. It still applies, though. 

 

Great site, gigawert! :thumbup2:

 

Especially considering you're hosting in on a 32GiB microSD card via a Raspberry Pi. 

 

Cat

 

Yep, and only on about $15 of extra equipment! I'm glad to hear that people are able to see my site outside of my network OK (my port forwarding is working).


Edited by gigawert, 03 August 2015 - 09:43 AM.

John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#8 cat1092

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 04:17 AM

I recently purchased a 32GB Samsung Pro SDHC card to keep a portable Linux Mint OS on, it still amazes me that even after the OS install, there's room left over to run a server. 

 

It was said that these Raspberry Pi computers has potential, though I never thought a server would be an option. Great job you've done there. :thumbsup:

 

Hopefully you'll expand large enough to go with a 64GB miniSDXC card, though avoid the Samsung EVO type of these, PRO is 2x faster for a little more cash & has a 10 year guarantee. I'm rooting for you to grow with your project,  :)

 

On Topic, I believe these can also run a dual boot of Windows 10 & Ubuntu 14.04, if desired. I remember something to the effect of a Windows 10 OS in the works for the Raspberry Pi. Probably done by now. If so, these two OS's should easily be able to co-exist, though certainly a 64GB card or larger would be needed. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 gigawert

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 09:22 AM

I recently purchased a 32GB Samsung Pro SDHC card to keep a portable Linux Mint OS on, it still amazes me that even after the OS install, there's room left over to run a server. 

 

It was said that these Raspberry Pi computers has potential, though I never thought a server would be an option. Great job you've done there. :thumbsup:

 

Hopefully you'll expand large enough to go with a 64GB miniSDXC card, though avoid the Samsung EVO type of these, PRO is 2x faster for a little more cash & has a 10 year guarantee. I'm rooting for you to grow with your project,  :)

 

On Topic, I believe these can also run a dual boot of Windows 10 & Ubuntu 14.04, if desired. I remember something to the effect of a Windows 10 OS in the works for the Raspberry Pi. Probably done by now. If so, these two OS's should easily be able to co-exist, though certainly a 64GB card or larger would be needed. 

 

Cat

Actually, Windows 10 for RPi is just a programming environment, not a full OS.  For now, I don't need a 64 GB card even though I am hosting all those files and pages. I'm only using 10 GB right now. And it's still using Raspbian because I'm not sure how I would set up the server in Ubuntu...

 

P.S. I'm thinking of adding a webcam or time lapse feature to my web site that looks out of the west side window of our house (to make a time lapse of the weather) :) and using the RPi camera module of course. 

 

This topic is getting seriously derailed. :P


Edited by gigawert, 04 August 2015 - 09:27 AM.

John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#10 cat1092

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 02:32 AM

 

 

This topic is getting seriously derailed.  :P

 

That's why I brought up the possibility of a Windows 10 & Ubuntu 14.04 install on the Raspberry. :)

 

I knew some testing had taken place, didn't know that Windows 10 for RPi was for programming only. Though I have little doubt that Ubuntu 14.04 will install & run fine on the device. 

 

That being out of the way, setting up a dual boot on most computers with Windows 10 & Ubuntu 14.04 should be easy, using the steps in Nick's OP. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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