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Linux USB doesn't do anything ...


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#1 jargos

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 01:15 AM

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/584522/by-downloading-windows-10-you-are-allowing-microsoft-to-spy-on-you/page-4#entry3775759

 

Hi all. I've been trying to get Linux going, and have gone according to the instructions by Condobloke in the post, above, all successfully.

 

But nothing happens after I reboot.

 

Someone said in the other forum .. "click on the executable" .. well, what's that ?

 

I had prepared a snapshot of what appears on the USB but can't seem to find how to attach it here. But it's just a collection of files and folders, none of which, seem to get the thing going.

 

Any help please ? Also, how do I attach the snapshot if needed ?

 

Thank you

JA

 

 

 

 


Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


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#2 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 02:06 AM


how do I attach the snapshot if needed ?

 

Choose an image hosting site to upload the image too (eg: http://imgur.com), upload the image to the image hosting site, copy the direct url to the image (it will look somethning like this "http://i.imgur.com/2VVFnsZ.png"), when writing your post click on the picture button (it's the green-ish colored box in the middle of the bottom row of post tools), paste in the url, and click OK.

 


nothing happens after I reboot.

 

Your computer must be configured to boot from the live-flashdrive you've created. You must do this in your BIOS or UEFI by changing the boot order. How you access your BIOS or UEFI settings varies from system to system, but typically it's achieved by pressing one of the F# keys when the system turns on, but hasn't yet booted any operating systems. For example, on my computer it's the F3 key. The simplest way to boot from the flashdrive would be to use your system's quick-boot menu, and then choose your device from the list. How you access this menu varies by system, just like changing settings for BIOS or UEFI does. For example on my system it's the F11 key. You press the appropriate F# key or what-ever key it is when the system first starts up, but hasn't yet booted any operating systems. If your system has secure-boot you will need to disable that in order to boot Linux Mint. If I've understood correctly, Linux Mint is the Linux distro you're attempting to use?

 

I noticed in the other thread you mentioned you've never used Linux before. Are you taking it for a spin in Try mode, or are you planning to install it? If your plan is to install it, you may want to hold off, and ask lots of questions first.



#3 jargos

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 03:02 AM

Thanks for the reply, hollowface.

 

Posting the immage ..

 

Couldn't really be that circuitous, could it ? Actually, I remember posting an image a while back on another thread here at BC, and I recall it was much simpler, though can't recall exactly what it was. But it haf none of the hosting stuff you referred to - more like just a copy paste thing.

 

Linux boot from USB ...

 

Concerning what you wrote, problem is, I am quite a layman. I have no idea what a BIOS or UEFI is. The other thing is, I wonder why no mention was made of the neccessary steps you mentioned, in the post to which my link (in OP) refers. I would have thought such essential material would have been highlighted, yet it wasn't - it was made to sound quite simple.

 

Yes, I have never used Linux or anything esle before. Only Windows, and whilst I'm happy with Win 7 (on both my computers) I am opposed to Microsofts privacy breaches that appear, would increase considerably with Win 10.

 

But Gee .. for something touted as simple, Linux is turning out to be a real pain .. to get going, anyway.

 

Why are you suggesting I hold off ?

 

Why is it all so hard ? It seeems the hardest part is to get it going - or does it get harder after that ?

 

Edited - a lot.


Edited by jargos, 01 August 2015 - 03:05 AM.

Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

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#4 Al1000

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 04:09 AM

Re posting an image:

The only way I know is by using a hosting site.

Re booting from USB:

BIOS stands for Basic Input Output Operating System, and it enables your computer to boot from the HDD, or from a USB etc. I'm not sure about UEFI as it's newer, and all I know is if you have UEFI then you have to switch "secure boot" off - hopefully someone with UEFI can help you with that if your computer has UEFI.

When you boot up your computer, one of the first screens you see is a screen that says something like "Press F4 to enter settings" - on my laptop it's F4, on my desktop pc it's the Delete button - as hollowface says this varies from computer to computer.

Do you see a screen with a message about entering settings when you boot up? As mentioned this should be one of the first things you see after you power the computer up - and before Windows begins to load.



But Gee .. for something touted as simple, Linux is turning out to be a real pain .. to get going, anyway.


It's easy when you've done it before. :)

In my experience, installing Linux is easier than installing Windows - but of course most Windows users don't have to install Windows as it's already on the computer when they buy it.

Edited by Al1000, 01 August 2015 - 04:13 AM.


#5 brainout

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 04:48 AM

@jargos, chances are your machine only boots from the hard drive, or you copied an iso file to a usb.  In either event, it won't work that way.  So let's try some alternatives, okay?  I feel responsible, since it seems you're now interested in Linux due to something I said in some other thread.  So more than normally, I want to help.

 

So who's the manufacturer of your machine?  If Dell, then to learn about BIOS, do this:

 

1.  As soon as you hit the power button, keep hitting F12 key until you see something called a 'boot menu'.  Look for 'Setup'. That's shorthand for BIOS setup.  Think of Bios as meaning 'Bootup Instructions (for Your) Operating System'.  So it's like a traffic cop ruling on which 'car' (operating system on your machine) may drive.  So, there is a 'menu' of settings that tell the cop, which car gets to drive. 

 

NOTE: if not Dell, then maybe you don't keep hitting F12, but instead F10 or Alt-F10 or sometimes even F2 key.  But the ideas are the same.

 

2. So go through all those menu settings, read them carefully, and be sure to change the one labelled 'boot sequence'.  The 'boot sequence' tells the BIOS 'cop' where to look for the 'car' (operating system) in the 'garage' (your computer's peripherals like CD, usb, etc).  For freedom's sake, you want the 'cop' to first look at your CD drive or usb port to allow that one to 'boot' (operate) your machine.  Thus you have up to three different 'cars' (operating systems) you can use.  So 'boot sequence' means which system gets to run; if no system is in the CD, then it looks on the usb;  if none are in the usb, then it goes to your hard drive.  This matters, for if Windows won't boot, you'll want a CD or floppy or usb selected first, then the others next, and your hard drive last (ignore 'NIC', that has to do with networks).  This gives you the freedom to repair or restore Windows, and to even learn if you'll like Linux.  Can't learn it, if you can't run it.

 

Now, re Linux..

 

3.  One of those 'cars', is a 'Linux'.  My suggestion is that you just flat go to Amazon and buy a Linux stick for a 'test drive'.  The ones I like the best are sold out, but here's one (click here) that's inexpensive, will reach you in two days, and you'll probably like it.  I have that one.  You can make it immediately for free instead, but right now maybe it's best to just simply buy it.  You can always make a free one, later.  Best of all, the one you bought will be VERY handy if you need to use someone else's computer, or fix your own. For the stick or CD, does not alter the internal hard drive.  It's like a computer-within-a-computer.  So you can't be wasting money.

 

4.  Now when the stick arrives, if you changed the 'boot sequence', you can just plug the stick or CD into your machine, turn on the machine, and you'll have Linux.  (First time it boots, takes maybe 10 minutes, for it sets up the drivers your machine needs.)  It can read your Windows drive and files, yet leave them alone.  If you need to, you can have Linux copy your Windows files and even write them to another external drive or DVD (which Windows itself, doesn't do well -- Linux does it much faster and better).  Moreover, Linux uses Firefox, so you can sync with your Windows Firefox browser, and immediately surf.  (Same with Chrome, if you use Chrome).  Same for Adobe and many other programs you use in Windows. But not all. 

 

5. So once you're 'driving' Linux, keep clicking on that lower left corner like you do in Windows (Linux has a Start Menu too, this one in the lower left corner as well): explore the menu options, see what you like.  For every program in Windows, there's a similar one in Linux.  For the programs Windows does better, you can find a way to RUN those programs via Linux.  But, let's not get into all that yet.  For now, just see what's familiar to you as a Windows user.  For you never have to give up the Windows you know.  Linux is Windows' best friend.  Especially now, with Windows 10 being so problemmatic.

 

6.  So now look at your Linux desktop:  in the middle of it, is an icon which says 'Install Mint'.  If you like what you see and want this 'Mint', you can install it to an EXTERNAL DRIVE other than the stick you just bought.  For the stick you bought, just enables you to test drive, or buy the 'car'.  And you don't have to touch the Windows 'car', either.

 

7.  So if you want to also buy the Linux car (for free, okay) then follow one or the other of my posts, here Essentially, all you do is click on that 'Install Mint' icon and make sure it installs on some OTHER external drive/stick you also plug into your machine.  That other drive becomes a car you customize as you please, carry anywhere you go, plug into any machine you want (well, if it has at least 1 GB of RAM), and .. drive.

 

Does this help?  Yell at me if not.


Edited by brainout, 01 August 2015 - 05:28 AM.

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#6 Al1000

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 06:18 AM

chances are your machine only boots from the hard drive

If that is the case then why suggest buying a bootable USB?

Chances are the computer will be able to boot from USB, because most modern computers are able to do so.

If JA followed the instructions that Condobloke posted, then he has already created a bootable USB.

Edited by Al1000, 01 August 2015 - 06:19 AM.


#7 wizardfromoz

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 07:21 AM

Hi jargos - just on the image hosting/posting:

 

Moderator Stolen wrote a good post here - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/536686/how-do-i-post-a-screen-shot/ some time ago, June last year, I think. I had joined a month earlier and nothing has changed since.

 

Good luck

 

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BTW I use Imgur too



#8 brainout

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 10:14 AM

Al1000, the SETTING is probably to only boot from the hard drive.  That's a default in most Windows machines, to make it appear as though the computer boots 'faster'.  Truth is, any computer can boot fast if you set it on fast boot, and if you disable checking peripherals and disable thorough POST.  So, that's probably why jargos couldn't get the usb to work: his settings in BIOS need to be changed.

 

That same problem persists in Win10.  Worse, its default 'fast boot' is really modified hibernate.  So hard drives will die sooner, will damage sooner, and cannot be read by Linux when they bork.  Check your own Power Setting, in Win10.  Make sure you enable access what is 'unavailable'  (link at the top of the dialogue box for Advanced Power Settings).  Else you won't see the option to disable 'fast boot' (scroll all the way down the dialogue box after enabling the 'unavailable'.. wow, what a convolution that is).

 

Finally, creating a bootable usb is not the same as creating a full working Linux on an external drive.  The purpose of a bootable usb as explained by Condobloke, is to INSTALL a permanent working Linux, historically on an internal drive. 

 

For a Windows user, this is not a good idea.  A better idea is to create that full working Linux on an external drive.  The latter will also be bootable, but has full persistence up to the full capacity of the drive.  A typical 'bootable usb' by contrast, only has persistence up to 4 GB.

 

Unfortunately the media used to create what I'm talking about, and the terminology, are so similar, even Linux people don't know about it.  You can't find this information in the official sites like Linux Mint or Ubuntu, etc.  They always want you to create 'bootable usb' sticks solely for the purpose of INSTALLING the distro to some internal drive. 

 

But you do NOT need to do it that way.  You can instead INSTALL to an external drive.  For a Windows user, this option is of paramount importance, so his underlying Windows machine, remains untouched.  This enables him to fix the machine when Windows borks, by using Linux.  ONE customized Linux is all he needs.  He can clone it, and that saves a ton of time.  Wish Windows could work like that, but it won't.

 

 

chances are your machine only boots from the hard drive

If that is the case then why suggest buying a bootable USB?

Chances are the computer will be able to boot from USB, because most modern computers are able to do so.

If JA followed the instructions that Condobloke posted, then he has already created a bootable USB.

 


Edited by brainout, 01 August 2015 - 10:23 AM.

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#9 Al1000

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 11:55 AM

Al1000, the SETTING is probably to only boot from the hard drive.

I'm not sure what setting you're referring to, but I was referring to the settings in the BIOS.

So, that's probably why jargos couldn't get the usb to work: his settings in BIOS need to be changed.

We have established that the settings in the BIOS need changed, thanks.

Check your own Power Setting, in Win10.

Umm, I don't have Windows 10. :confused:

Finally, creating a bootable usb is not the same as creating a full working Linux on an external drive.

Yes, I know.

The purpose of a bootable usb as explained by Condobloke, is to INSTALL a permanent working Linux, historically on an internal drive.



For a Windows user, this is not a good idea. A better idea is to create that full working Linux on an external drive.

A bootable USB can be used to install Linux to either an internal or external drive.

A typical 'bootable usb' by contrast, only has persistence up to 4 GB.

I don't think the OP has any intention of using the USB with persistence. As far as I'm aware, the purpose of the bootable USB is to install Linux.

Let's wait for the OP to respond before we confuse the issue any more. :)

#10 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 04:18 PM

Not sure if anyone welcomed you to the Linux section yet, but welcome :).

I have no idea what a BIOS or UEFI is.


It's the software built into your motherboard that allows you to boot into your operating systems like Windows, or Linux Mint, as well as control certain aspects of your hardware. BIOS has been around for many years, UEFI has been around for quite some time as well but only recently has become the new standard.

I wonder why no mention was made of the neccessary steps you mentioned, in the post to which my link (in OP) refers


Knowing how to boot from various devices, and change BIOS/UEFI settings is, by many, considered to be a prerequisite piece of knowledge. I cannot say if that is why the poster excluded it, but that's my guess.

it was made to sound quite simple.


The actual act of installing most big-name Linux operating systems is usually not difficult. However, much the same as installing Windows, what makes it seem complicated is all the stuff you need to know about your computer, and how you have it setup.

Why are you suggesting I hold off ?


As mentioned above, there are things you need to know about your computer, and how it's setup before attempting to install any operating system, whether it be Linux or Windows. It's quite common for people to get ahead of themselves, and install Linux incorrectly. The result being that they delete their personal files, or accidentally destroy their existing operating system installations (eg: Windows). Then they end up stuck with a Linux operating system they may or may not like. Not trying to scare you off, just trying to make sure you don't rush into this, and end up in a situation like that. For example, I'm presuming, at this point, you don't even know if your hardware is compatible with Linux Mint.

It seeems the hardest part is to get it going - or does it get harder after that ?


In my opinion, most big-name Linux distros aren't as easy to use as Windows, that's not to say they are difficult to use, but they do take time to become comfortable with using. Linux Mint is one of the easier distros to switch to, and has good out-of-the-box hardware support, making it an excellent choice for someone who is new to Linux.

for something touted as simple, Linux is turning out to be a real pain .. to get going, anyway.


Again, not to scare you off, but I would not describe any Linux distro as being as simple to use as Windows. When you factor in how different it is, it can seem a scary to a new user. Once you've used it for a while it's not so scary anymore.

My advice at this point would be to boot up the Linux Mint live-flashdrive you've made yourself, and run it in Try mode, so you can fiddle around, and see how you like it, without actually installing it on your computer. Try doing common tasks, and see if the software you'll want is available. It will run very slow from the flashdrive, so don't let that factor into your decision.

If you wish to install Linux Mint, the members here in the Linux section can help you find out what you need to know about your hardware and your current setup, to install Linux Mint properly, as well as discuss what you'll need to do before installing, if applicable to your situation.
 

#11 jargos

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 09:42 PM

Guys .. all who have helped above, particularly hollowface, thanks a million. And guess what ?

 

I DONE IT !!!

 

I followed all your instructions, got into the BIOS (now THERE'S a learning curve) eventually found the boot order, stuck in the USB, re-started .. and there was Linux.

 

I am so exited :-)))))

 

First imrpessions - Linux Mint feels GREAT !!! I am so impressed with it. I'm going to continue to run it off the USB for a while, on my 'play' lap top, then if I'm all happy, I'll install it, and if I'm happy with all that, I'll then run it off the same USB on my 'serious' laptop, etc, etc.

 

Step by step. Stage by stage. I reckon I'll be completely free of the big brother MSFT at some future point. Not that I got that much to hide, but the arrogant, presumptuous nature of MSFT and others, is something that should be resisted at all turns. The Orwellian TV advertisesment I saw for W10 a couple of nights ago, was enough to send a chill down my spine .. babies crawling wide and goggle eyes to some great glare from some great animated window ..... CREEPY, OH SO CREEPY !!!!!!!

 

I am really indebited to you guys for your help, and to this wonderful web site.

 

I have a couple of other quick questions ..

 

- I assume that I can put the same USB in any other computer, and, after changing the BIOS startup order, of course, run Linux off that USB on that computer, right ?

 

- What is 'persistence'  

 

- And this one might sound trite, but .. how do I change the 'taskbar' size and icons on the Linus desktop to make them bigger ? I had a good fiddle around with it, but couldn't find it.

 

In closing, I hear all your cautions ! Thank you for them.

 

Hollowface, about your final paragraph in the above post, again, thank you for the offer to help. On the Linux desktop is an icon .. "install Linux" and when I do want to install, I will try that and see what happens. May not be for a while, though, I'm happy to muck around with it from the USB for some months, and when I do install, it will be firstly, just on my 'play' laptop.

 

Cheers all.

 

JA

 

PS - I also wanted to thank brainout for the initial post in the other thread, and the comprehensive post a few back here. Thanks.


Edited by jargos, 01 August 2015 - 09:50 PM.

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#12 pcpunk

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 10:33 PM

You can use the USB in other computers to some extent, like if they have similar or supported hardware, I'm not completely up on the subject though.

 

Here is a description for you about persistence.

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/what-is-persistent-linux/

 

I forget about the taskbar as I am using KDE now, you might Right Click on it and play around with it.

 

Before you choose to install to HDD on your play laptop post back for your options.  You could leave your windows operating system on there and Dual boot with linux.  Like you have seen it is not hard, but there are things you should know before you make a move, or you could loose your current OS etc.  You could also do a dry run and Full Install to a USB to learn how to use the "Install Mint" option.  

 

This would be done from a LiveLinuxDVD or usb,(even the one you have now would work), to another decent size USB.  Unlike the pendrive install, a Full Install would be just like putting it to your Hardrive, and would have NO Persistence file, it would all be as a full OS and would not be limited to a smallish 4gb persistence file.  This would give you good experience to Install and then when you are ready to go to the HDD you will have some experience.

 

Good to see you aboard! 


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#13 pcpunk

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 10:39 PM

Oh, be careful when you are in Linux as you have access to all of Windows files and could delete a partition or anything really, the whole OS lol, you don't want that.  The Bonus is-you can also access all that data if you need it, and for advanced users - Repair Windows.  You could also save files to Windows if you want, but be careful as you could infect windows easily if you don't know what you are doing.  Running from a usb is pretty cool  huh!


Edited by pcpunk, 02 August 2015 - 12:28 PM.

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#14 jargos

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:21 AM

pcpunk .. 

 

Running from a usb is pretty cool  huh!

 

Indeed it is. Lot's of fun, but more importantly, I'm really impressed at my learning curve these last few days.

 

Well, I've ventured to run it off both my laptops, and it works a treat. I am really pleased.

 

And I've spent a lot of time familiarising myself with the different terms, etc, changed themes, colours, copied over some files from boot / C drive .. all good.

 

As I said earlier, I'm going to take my time and learn it well before I go all over to it.

 

A couple of other questions if I may ..

 

- What about virus protection ? Do I need any on Linux ? On W7 I have MSE and Malwarebytes - but I think I read somewhere that this kind of protection is not needed on Linux.

 

- In Windows, I am a frequent user of CCleaner - run it multiple times daily, as I found it to be one of the best tools. I dowloaded it in Linux, it's sitting in 'downloads' but when I click, nothing happens. Often, in Windows, after several hours Internet use, a CCleaner clean can wipe 2000 - 3000 temporary Internet files and hundreds of cookies and other stuff. Does a similar thing happen in Linux, and if so, what cleaning tool is appropriate ?

 

Thanks. JA


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Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#15 jargos

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:25 AM

Hollowface, post #10 above.

 

Thank you for your welcome, which I just now saw.


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