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Win10 Installer bomb due to licensing: sleuthing ideas


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#1 brainout

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 09:07 AM

I keep on reading the horrific experiences over in tenforums, where either the upgrade install or the clean install post-update, bombs, hangs, or trashes the machine.  At this point, there are maybe 200 such reports, and that means thousands more unreported problems, are occurring.  We've seen some here, as well.

 

As Insiders, we had generally pleasant installations (though my initial experience with build 10130 was straight from Hades) -- so why is that?  What's the essential difference between our experience, and 'theirs'?

 

THE LICENSE KEY WAS NOT AN ISSUE.

 

But of course it is and should be an issue, in the real upgrade installations of real and official, Win10.  So perhaps the license key sleuthing in the installer, is misprogrammed?  To wit:

 

1.  Johnny's COA on his machine was originally Vista but he upgraded it to Win7, with a valid Win7 upgrade.  But the installer, is programmed to look at the mobo for the key, and it's Vista.  So the installer silently bombs or goes into a hang, because it also finds Win7 with SP1 on there, active, but doesn't find the key so doesn't know what to do.  Johnny, of course, gets no feedback but rather spends his day mystified and angry.

 

2.  Jane's COA on her machine is Win7 with SP1 but is 32-bit, and her brother changed it to 64-bit with an OEM System Builder, but again since the license key doesn't match, the Win10 installer doesn't know what to do, but goes farther since both are Win7.. and then bombs in some other way.  Maybe saying 'Installation Failed' or 'Something went wrong'.  So clearly the installer's programmer didn't want to clarify the problem is a licensing conflict.

 

3.  brainout's COA on her machine is Windows 7, but brainout used a clean disk to install a brand new retail 8.0;  its own key was not accepted to activate; yet that was magically fixed remotely by MSFT when she called MSFT post-install, to activate it.  Then, brainout updated to 8.1 via the Windows Store, not being given a new key.  So Win10 'saw' that 8.0 key when prompting brainout to type it in during build 10162 install: so now at 10240, Win10 is activated.

 

4.  Fabio's COA is Windows 7 64-bit and so too his OS at the time of Win10 installation: same initial OS, same key, same everything except added Win7 updates and third-party programs.  The Win10 installer has no problem finishing on his machine, because both COA and OS, match.

 

See the difference? The 'purpose' of the install bombing, might be to force a customer to call MSFT, so it can remotely verify the license key.  But no one is told this, and of course not all license keys validly extant, are yet recorded by MSFT employees, who are frazzedly trying to finish that job.

 

Ergo, this topic:  have you solved an install by calling in your key to activate?  What kind of error was it you experienced prior, just in case there's a pattern here so another can say your experience resembles his?

 

If this is considered a stupid topic, please delete it.  My heart just breaks for all those suffering over installation.

 

:exclame: EDIT: :exclame:    someone sent me this great Forbes article on the tie-in between successful installation, and licenses:  click here.


Edited by brainout, 30 July 2015 - 11:30 AM.

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#2 orlbuckeye

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 09:54 AM

My Windows 10 installed yesterday AM on my maid machine which I had reserved a copy. I received the message from MS and started the process it too about a half over (Most tech previews took me 3 to 4 hours). My Windows 10 is activated. I then went to the MS site to download the Create Media tool. I ran that and download an ISO. The instructions on this process weren't real clear with the Keys but I finished the DL and create a  DVD. I also got a message from Dell to create a System restore flash drive. It required a 16 gb flash drive and i didn't have a spare so I will buy one after work today and make the System restore flash drive. 

 

My current status:

 

1. Windows 10 up and running on main machine. I'm preparing 3 other machines that aren't turned on a lot by doing updates. I have a HP laptop that hasn't had an update since 2012. So after over 200 updates I had to turn off while im at work today.  I have another machines that is Windows 8.1  that I updated and  Windows 10 was reserved so Im waiting for word form MS that it's ready. Then I have another older machine that came with Vista (OEM) and I did a clean install with Windows 7 ultimate.  I look in the windows update history and it says Windows 10 update failed. I tried the create media app which has an option to create and ISO or do the upgrade on that machine. Well it stopped and gave me a message "Stopped for some reason".

 

 

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/insider/forum/insider_wintp-insider_install/the-free-upgrade-to-windows-10-for-windows-7-oem/b622ef33-ac69-4ca1-b7d1-9aa08321809f

 

 

This am I was curious about key I know the instructions on the create media page talk about entering a key. So that got me curious and i researched and here's what I found

 

1. Upgrading from OEM Win 7 or 8.1 When you do the upgrade the key is embedded into Bios just like what you upgraded from

2. Retail upgrade for Win 7 or Win 8 - This requires you to enter the Windows 7 or 8 that you are upgrading when prompted for a key. You should have this key in an email if you purchased a electronic download of the install ISO  or the packaging you purchased.

 

That makes sense because the Retail version would prompt for the key and not machine dependent.  


Edited by orlbuckeye, 30 July 2015 - 09:59 AM.

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#3 gigawert

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 10:21 AM

You just have to be patient and it will install.


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#4 rp88

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 11:17 AM

orlbuckeye, post#2: make yourself a system image as well as a system recovery drive. All that a recovery drive does is get you into a position (the windows recovery environment) from where you can then use a system image (reliable and effective), system restore (fails in some cases) or automatic repair options. A system image will need an external drive which calls itself a "local disk" and the drive will need to be larger than the image being made (this is usually about 55 GB for an OS with a few but not many programs installed).
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#5 Torvald

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 11:17 AM

I have a laptop that originally came with Windows Vista installed, but I later used a Windows 7 Upgrade DVD on it.  Have left it turned on at home today in hopes that my reserved copy of Windows 10 will download while I'm at work.  However, based on the OPs message above, my Win 10 upgrade might hang when I try to install it if it sees I originally had Vista on the laptop.

 

What is the telephone number I should use to call Microsoft for help if that happens?


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#6 brainout

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 11:29 AM

@Torvald, it's not certain YOU will have the problem hypothecated above.  It's just a posited idea why so many people are having trouble.  Then, orlbuckeye mentioned he had problems.  For others, activation happened later: which suggests,  maybe there's a 'waiting list' on folks activated but not yet registered in MSFT servers.

 

Activation Phone number: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/326851

The number is now in the topic's first post, too.


Edited by brainout, 30 July 2015 - 11:38 AM.

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#7 Legio

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 11:56 AM

The 'purpose' of the install bombing, might be to force a customer to call MSFT, so it can remotely verify the license key


Ask yourself: "WHY will a corporation will need to spend extra money to have call centers remotely verify a license key?  The answer is none.


The correct answer is 2 fold:

ONE  is that an OS might be legitimate..but is there OTHER softwares on that machine that may not be.....

TWO legal back up: connecting a voice, a number, a location, a product, a machine and  a voluntatry action (calling) Basically your are "pre-screwed" in cases you get in court with/agaisnt them.




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