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PSU and UPS Question (Pure Sine Wave)


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#1 kktto

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 01:53 PM

I am looking for a new UPS for my machine. I'm not in the US so I don't have my pick of what online has, just what's available locally. I was looking at this one:

 

http://www.amazon.com/APC-BR1500G-Back-UPS-10-outlet-Uninterruptible/dp/B003Y24DEU

 

The overall reviews are good, but one review mentions that it's a risky choice for newer machines and was published in 2011:

 

http://goo.gl/38zp7u

 

It mentions that newer machines need a pure sine wave. My PSU is this one:

 

http://goo.gl/6NP26b

 

How can I find out if my PSU needs pure sine wave, if it would work properly with this UPS? Also, do UPSes give the approximated sine wave all the time or only when on battery? Will a PSU that needs pure sine wave not work at all on an approximated sine wave, or work and get damaged?

 

Thanks.

 



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#2 YeahBleeping

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 02:13 PM

That power supply does indeed use active power factor correction so if the amazon's postings are correct you would indeed need a UPS that uses pure sine wave instead of stepper.



#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 09:31 PM

The hazard of running on a non-sine wave UPS would be overheating and eventual failure of the power supply.  How the PS fails will determine if any other components get damaged.   The output from the battery circuit would be non-sine wave but when on regular power it would be okay.   A non-sine wave power unit tends to provide more voltage for a longer period, making the regulator circuits work hard to hold the voltage down, thus more heat.



#4 kktto

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 03:47 PM

That power supply does indeed use active power factor correction so if the amazon's postings are correct you would indeed need a UPS that uses pure sine wave instead of stepper.

 

 

The hazard of running on a non-sine wave UPS would be overheating and eventual failure of the power supply.  How the PS fails will determine if any other components get damaged.   The output from the battery circuit would be non-sine wave but when on regular power it would be okay.   A non-sine wave power unit tends to provide more voltage for a longer period, making the regulator circuits work hard to hold the voltage down, thus more heat.

 


thanks for the replies, I'll look into trying to get a proper UPS then.






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