Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Windows 7 Installer Hangs on "Starting Windows" - UEFIootable USB


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 mainuser755

mainuser755

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:26 PM

Posted 24 July 2015 - 09:49 PM

I am trying to install Windows 7 Professional (64-bit edition) on a Lenovo Y50 computer with UEFI and a GPT-formatted hard disk.

 

This computer is currently running Windows 8.1, which boots correctly. Its hybrid hard disk is formatted GPT. I would also like to keep the disk GPT-formatted and UEFI mode enabled The PC has no CD/DVD drive, so I must use a USB drive as the installation/boot media. I used the utility Rufus (options FAT32 and GPT for UEFI selected) and an ISO of the installation DVD to create the installation media on another Windows 8.1 machine. I then turned off secure boot on my target PC and booted the USB. I got past the "loading files" screen and saw the familiar Windows 7 "points of light" boot animation with the words "Starting Windows". At some point, however, the animation and - apparently - the rest of the system froze completely. I was forced to use the power button to turn it off.

 

Things I have tried:

  • Trying the whole thing again
  • Waiting at the frozen "Starting Windows" screen
  • Using the Windows 7 USB/DVD download tool to make the bootable USB drive
  • Mounting the ISO and copying all files to a new FAT32 volume on the flash drive 
  • Switching hard disk from AHCI to "Compatible" mode in the UEFI settings 
  • Switching off the nVidia graphics card in UEFI 

Needless to say, none of those worked. A few of them made my system not recognize the thumb drive as bootable at all. The others led to the same hang I experienced the first time.

 

Things I have NOT tried:

  • Using Compatible/legacy/BIOS mode: I want to use UEFI to boot my system. 
  • Using a DVD or CD to boot the system: This PC does not have a CD/DVD drive, and I do not have any external drives available at the moment.

 

What gives?

 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 brainout

brainout

  • Members
  • 1,190 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston
  • Local time:02:26 PM

Posted 25 July 2015 - 02:07 AM

Okay, the first problem is that usually Windows versions want to boot in ascendancy.  They can't handle retro.  So if you had first created a Win7 clean installation, then created a separate partition for 8.1, it would automatically 'make room for' Win7, give it a key, and let you use UEFI dual boot.  But UEFI came into being after Win7.  So even if you get Win7 to work in dual boot AFTER 8.1, Win7 might be wonky, because 8.1 is installed first.  I had the same problem with installing XP after Win7, but in that case XP just took over.  No allowance for dual boot.  Win7 should have been installed after XP, in which case I'd have a dual boot no problemo.

 

Moreover, some versions of Win7 require RAID ON in BIOS, but 8.1 does not.  That you didn't get a BSOD blue screen, implies some other problem, though.  (BIOS mis-settings usually create BSODs at boot.)

 

I found this video on the mechanics of what you want to do: maybe it will help?

And, this webpage.  And this one from superuser, one of the sites often having good answers.

 

Also, folks tend to talk about BSD to set up dual boot, especially for situations like this.  I bought BSD's multibooter thingy, have its installer somewhere; but I don't understand it, right now.  This is as much as I know to help, sorry!


Edited by brainout, 25 July 2015 - 02:16 AM.

(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#3 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 54,827 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:26 PM

Posted 25 July 2015 - 07:13 AM

Links Worth A Look

 

Louis



#4 mainuser755

mainuser755
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:26 PM

Posted 26 July 2015 - 05:34 PM

Thank you for your replies.

 

I should have made it clear that I am not trying to dual boot Windows 8.1 and Windows 7. I want to replace Windows 8.1 with Windows 7. The reason I want to avoid creating a new GPT or MBR partition table is that I want to keep the manufacturer recovery partition and some other partitions in place. My goal is to get Windows 7 and Ubuntu dual-booted, but I am focusing on replacing Windows 8.1 with Windows 7 for now. (FWIW, the Ubuntu installer also experienced a hang during boot.)  

 

Could the existing Windows 8.1 installation really be preventing my Windows 7 USB key from booting properly? 



#5 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 21,615 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:26 PM

Posted 26 July 2015 - 06:14 PM

See this video. I have used this method with success. Also see this tutorial.



#6 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 54,827 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:26 PM

Posted 26 July 2015 - 06:31 PM

Unless I've gone haywire again :)...you cannot replace a Win 8.1 install with Win 7...and keep a recovery mechanism that relates to an original 8.1 install...and have it serve some practical purpose.

 

Louis






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users