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"Win 7 OEM and Win 10 would like it on two hdd so I can boot from both"


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#1 barry cohen

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 04:32 PM

"I have Win 7 64bit. I have C drive 500g  D drive [storage/backup 350g plenty of space in both drives]. Can I make both
drives boot ? So when win 10 is ready I can download to D drive and dual boot, take it for a daily test drive to get used to it, while I do my normal stuff on C drive win 7 OEM.    thanks    barry
 


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 23 July 2015 - 06:11 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Win 10


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#2 reckonankit

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 03:23 AM

Hey you can easily upgrade to windows 10. if you are running windows 7 then upgrade to same drive windows 10. You are not able to download separate version of windows 10. Its only available as upgrade version those who running windows 7 or windows 8.1



#3 brainout

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 04:59 AM

@barry cohen.  Yes, you can put Win10 on your drive D.  That's what I did, same total space as you have, which is good (Win10 needs a lot of space).  Do you see your 'Get Windows 10' icon in your system tray?  It's more like a big blue advertisement.  If you see it, you can right now RESERVE your copy of it, but there will be more work to do.  You won't maybe get it for some months.  MSFT will send it to you as a download.

 

Steps:

 

1.  Before the Download arrives, Prepare your BIOS boot so you are not locked out of your computer by Windows 10 (click here), and

 

2.  Prepare your D drive.  Make sure it's formatted as NTFS, and has NO other files of any kind on it.  So if you now have backup files, you'll need to remove them.

 

3.  When the download comes, you will be given the option of Custom Install.  CONNECT ALL OF YOUR DEVICES to the machine: your printer, your camera, whatever you would normally use, so Windows can detect what you have and install the right drivers.  So after that, elect that 'Custom Install', and you'll be presented with a list of drives to which you can install.  Select the drive you readied in 2. 

 

4. Next you'll be presented with a blue screen which has a big EXPRESS INSTALL at the lower right, but in the lower left, a tiny 'customize' link.  Pick the latter. Once in 'customize', you'll notice that Microsoft is turning your computer into Big Brother, so that 'Cortana' (a kind of computer personal assistant) can work on your machine.  It requres that all your input, including your camera and microphone, be 'on' and 'shared' with Microsoft and its 'trusted partners'.  I'm thinking you won't like that, so you are presented with a bunch of sharing options you'll want to turn OFF.  It's painstaking to do this.

 

5.  Then you're presented with the License, so please read it.  You will be mandated to accept EVERY UPDATE Microsoft sends you, and if you don't want that, do not 'Agree' and Windows 10 will not be installed.  Or, do accept that, and Windows 10 will be installed.

 

6.  Now before or after #5, you might have been asked for your Microsoft Account name, and if you didn't have one, to create one.  You need to create one, because in Microsoft there are other privacy-invading options turned 'on' in your machine which you can only access and shut off, if you have a Microsoft account.  So log in or create your Microsoft account, if now prompted to do so.

 

7.  Afterwards, it will take a good hour or more for Windows 10 to download and install.  Some people experienced 4-9 hours, depending on your connection, what devices you have hooked up, etc. DO NOT interrupt the process.  The machine may reboot several times, as Windows needs to restructure what it downloads and installs, based on what it just installed.

 

8.  Once it's all done, the machine will tell you (I think it makes a chirpy sound, too, I forget).  Once it does, it will boot and ask you for your password using your Microsoft account. 

 

9. The FIRST thing you want to do as soon as you get in the system, is right-click on the desktop, select Personalize, look in the top left corner where you'll see "<-- Settings", and click on that word (it doesn't seem like a link, but it is).  Then scroll down the ugly menu which you see next, and probably in the lower right corner you'll see "Privacy".  Click on it.  Then click on every item in the listing on both left and right, be sure to use the scrollbars to make sure you've seen every setting.  You are opted into sharing your camera, microphone, locations, typing, 'inking' (I don't know what Microsoft means by that), etc.  So you will want to turn all those features OFF.  Some of them, will require you go online, and when you click on every line of text you see (for they don't look like links), you will eventually find the ones which take you to Microsoft's own website, and to Bing.  In the former, there are 6-9 other options of 'sharing' which are auto ON you may well want to turn off, such as what kind of advertising will show up in Edge and the search bar.  I couldn't get Bing to work, so I'm not sure how many opt-out selections you have to make in Bing.  Point is, this step alone will take a good hour or more.

 

10.  Finally, to get rid of the ads, you have to left-click in the Search box, look left and you'll see a thin frame of indecipherable symbols.  One looks like a gear, near the top. That's Settings.  There are more opt-outs there, and above all to avoid the ads, you'll want to turn off the setting that lets you search 'the web' from the search bar.  For until you finish typing what you seek, you are pommelled with ads.   For Edge, you have to elect some other url as your home page, to get out of msn and its ads, bombarding you as soon as you load Edge.  To get a different search engine other than Bing, you have many more steps.Rocky Bennet in this forum had the brilliant solution of just saying 'www.google.com' as his home page.  That kills two birds with one url. :)

 

Then and only then, is your username likely free of  'sharing', when using Windows 10.  So now you can shut it off, and then when you turn it on again, you will be given an option to boot in Windows 10 or 7.  If you do nothing, it will boot in Windows 10.  Note: only your username has opted out.  Those default settings remain for any new usernames you create, so you'd have to repeat Steps #9-10, every time you create a new user.

 

If you like Windows 7, you'll probably not like Windows 10.  So go get Classic Shell (free download, google on the name), to make the transition easier. Create a lot of desktop shortcuts and then a Desktop toolbar (same procedure as for Windows 7), in order to customize your own menu.  For you cannot really customize the Win10 Start Menu.  It's just the Windows 8 start screen, but now made a long vertical list which takes forever to scroll through.  You cannot customize the font faces, and there's only one theme, which is modified Aero (glassy, the task bar and menu change with the pictures).  Copy your pictures in Windows/Web/Wallpaper, to get a true 'slideshow'.

 

Does all this help?


Edited by brainout, 24 July 2015 - 05:22 AM.

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#4 orlbuckeye

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 02:26 PM

"I have Win 7 64bit. I have C drive 500g  D drive [storage/backup 350g plenty of space in both drives]. Can I make both
drives boot ? So when win 10 is ready I can download to D drive and dual boot, take it for a daily test drive to get used to it, while I do my normal stuff on C drive win 7 OEM.    thanks    barry
 

Ok if you buy Windows 10 you will be able to just install it on the D drive and setup the boot manager to dual boot. But the free Windows 10 is an upgrade and it will allow you to do a clean install AFTER you upgrade your Windows 7. When you upgrade Windows 10 will be re-activated with a new key. That key is used to do clean installs of Windows 10.  


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#5 brainout

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 11:56 PM

No, beloved buckeye.  It's part of the installation process itself, to install on a new drive or partition, 'Custom Installation'.  I gave my 8.1 key as a prerequisite, too, after that option was accepted by the installer.  The installation procedure changed.  First it asked for the generic Win10 key, which I provided, then second it wanted my actual key, which I provided, then third it asked for the Win10 key again, which I provided.  so the first and third steps are likely not in the installers going out to the public come July 29.  (It wasn't like that before, when I tried unsuccessfully to install build 10130).

 

That's the procedure beginning in build 10162, which was my first-installed successful build.  Maybe you had an earlier build and it was different.


Edited by brainout, 25 July 2015 - 12:03 AM.

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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 03:48 AM

Actually orlbuckeye is correct. The only way to dual boot the RTM version of Windows 10 with an older version of Windows is if you purchase a copy of Windows 10. To brainout. I have just cleaned installed the newest build, 10240, from an ISO and it did not require any product key. I have been doing these beta tests only since April and this is the third build that I have installed. Once I registered in the program with an MSN account, I have never had to enter a product key ever again. That includes if you clean install or upgrade. As long as you have an MSN account linked to your computer then there is no product keys required. Remember this is Windows 10 and all of the information is stored in the cloud, even if you clean install from an ISO the product key is already pre-activated in the cloud. That is the beauty of Windows 10.


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#7 Charlie_Delta1

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 04:13 AM

I downloaded the ISO for Build 10240 from the site that starts with a "K", used Rufus to make it into a bootable thumb drive and installed it on a newly-created partition on my extra "D" drive, for experimental purposes.

 

Barry, if you have 2 drives, you might be better off partitioning one and installing Win10 to it (with Win7) and use the 2nd drive as a "data" drive.  EasyBCD gives great control over the boot process after installation.



#8 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 04:30 AM

Charlie, I don't think the OP is interested in beta preview software, he is interested in the RTM of Windows 10. As was pointed out upstream, he will have to purchase a copy of Windows 10 in order to dual boot with his Windows 7. But with your other suggestion about partitioning, you are absolutely correct.


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#9 brainout

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 11:48 AM

Actually orlbuckeye is correct. The only way to dual boot the RTM version of Windows 10 with an older version of Windows is if you purchase a copy of Windows 10. To brainout. I have just cleaned installed the newest build, 10240, from an ISO and it did not require any product key. I have been doing these beta tests only since April and this is the third build that I have installed. Once I registered in the program with an MSN account, I have never had to enter a product key ever again. That includes if you clean install or upgrade. As long as you have an MSN account linked to your computer then there is no product keys required. Remember this is Windows 10 and all of the information is stored in the cloud, even if you clean install from an ISO the product key is already pre-activated in the cloud. That is the beauty of Windows 10.

 

 

I quoted you and bolded the first two sentences; the rest of the paragraph seems to contradict?  Then again, I've been up all night fighting my kitchen ants and maybe am not reading correctly?

 

All I can tell you is that I was GIVEN the option to do a clean install, called during the installation process, "Custom Installation", and I did have to provide my product key.  Since I have a number of Windows 7 machines?  Or, because the machine I was installing on, had a freshly installed retail Windows 8.0 Pro upgraded through the Windows Store, to 8.1?  In any event, I had designated D drive, and it is now the seat of Windows 10.  So I do indeed have a dual boot Win8.1 or Win10 drive.  For no purchase.  Not only that, but these three links show 1)  it's commonly known that this is allowed for Windows 10,  and 2) not merely for the Insiders. Then 3) the idea is to preserve the old so you don't lose it.  So the point those articles stress,

  • you cannot do an in-place upgrade unless you have 7 or 8.1,
  • so you must do clean install if you purchase,
  • but you can do clean install if eligible for a free Win10 via 7 or 8.1. 
  • The EULA doesn't prohibit dual-booting, either.

 

Yes, I had an MSN account at the time, but it PROMPTED me for a product key.  Now, my first successful installation was 10162, so that's later than yours, and maybe they changed the TERMS?   :huh:


Edited by brainout, 25 July 2015 - 12:10 PM.

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#10 orlbuckeye

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 01:56 PM

No, beloved buckeye.  It's part of the installation process itself, to install on a new drive or partition, 'Custom Installation'.  I gave my 8.1 key as a prerequisite, too, after that option was accepted by the installer.  The installation procedure changed.  First it asked for the generic Win10 key, which I provided, then second it wanted my actual key, which I provided, then third it asked for the Win10 key again, which I provided.  so the first and third steps are likely not in the installers going out to the public come July 29.  (It wasn't like that before, when I tried unsuccessfully to install build 10130).

 

That's the procedure beginning in build 10162, which was my first-installed successful build.  Maybe you had an earlier build and it was different.

I'm not talking about the technical preview  I'm talking about the released version after July 29th the upgrade version.  When you do the upgrade you get your key for Windows 10 which is used when doing a clean install. The released version doesn't use a universal key each license will have a key.


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#11 brainout

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 02:23 PM

@orlbuckeye:  Yes, I know.  And the links in my post to Rocky Bennett, apply to post-preview, 'official'  installs.  You must provide a real key;  that's also what I had to do, when installing the 10162 preview, which is now 10240 and activated.   Read the articles, that's better than me talking. :grinner:


Edited by brainout, 25 July 2015 - 02:26 PM.

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#12 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 02:24 PM

brainout, just two quick points. My post clearly stated the RTM version of Windows 10. If anyone trys to dual boot both an older copy of Windows such as Windows 7 or 8.1 with the RTM version of Windows 10 under one license, then that is theft, plain and simple. If they want to join the technical preview program and run two copies of Windows at the same time, then that is a different matter all together. Also, during the loading process of a newer build of Windows 10 technical previews, when it asks for a product key, just skip that. I know the loading process of Windows 10 is so fast now adays that you really might miss this step entirely, but if you do see the screen that asks for a product key you can just skip that because that is history. I have NEVER been asked for a product key, and I have loaded Windows 10 9 different times. 


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#13 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 02:25 PM

@orlbuckeye:  Yes, I know.  And the links in my post to Rocky Bennett, apply to post-preview installs.  You provide a real key, like I had to when I installed the 10162 preview.   Read the articles, that's better than me talking. :grinner:

 

 

I actually clicked on all of those links and read those articles and I did not see anything pertinent to this conversation or question.


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#14 brainout

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 03:53 PM

We're not talking theft here, nor are we talking about preview, because he can't actually get it via preview, anymore.  Nor, was that his OP question.  He was asking what to do when it ARRIVES.  So that's the official version, not the preview.

 

The official version's notification will arrive in his system tray sometime after July 29.  MSFT closed off the download link.

 

Just think in terms of official release, okay?

 

Someone who has TWO VALID LICENSES can get TWO VALID WIN 10 upgrades.  If those licenses are on two computers, or one computer, shouldn't matter.  The Win7 license, is its own license, with its own key.  The Win8.1 license is its own license with its own (originally 8.0, pretend), key.  TWO licenses. These can be installed by the owner on one drive, or two drives, but they are SEPARATE licenses, agreed?

 

The terms are, you can get Windows 10 FREE, ONE PER LICENSE, if you have Windows 7 OR Windows 8.1.  So if you have TWO, one each, then you can get TWO Win10, one per older license.  Right?  Let's go one point at a time.

 

Or, do what you want.  He asked what to do to prepare for the OFFICIAL version.  So, I tried to answer.  Bye.


Edited by brainout, 25 July 2015 - 04:27 PM.

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#15 orlbuckeye

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 04:49 PM

brainout, just two quick points. My post clearly stated the RTM version of Windows 10. If anyone trys to dual boot both an older copy of Windows such as Windows 7 or 8.1 with the RTM version of Windows 10 under one license, then that is theft, plain and simple. If they want to join the technical preview program and run two copies of Windows at the same time, then that is a different matter all together. Also, during the loading process of a newer build of Windows 10 technical previews, when it asks for a product key, just skip that. I know the loading process of Windows 10 is so fast now adays that you really might miss this step entirely, but if you do see the screen that asks for a product key you can just skip that because that is history. I have NEVER been asked for a product key, and I have loaded Windows 10 9 different times. 

I have never been asked either but I haven't done a clean install since the first build. The RTM is Technical Preview build 10240. I've heard it has been removed and of you haven't joined the insider program it's too late. I'm not sure about that but its what I read in a forum.


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