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Backing up my System with DVDs and NTFS


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#1 clayto

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 10:27 AM

I am going to have a go at backing up my system to DVDs (using AOME).  I have had one try with another program but it did not turn out OK, despite spending hours and three DVDs on it.

 

I think first I need to Format my (RAM) discs with NTFS, ie. the same as my © Drive, but now my Windows 8.1 does not offer me the option of NTFS, only UDF, in different flavours.  Why is this, and what can I do about it?

 

clayto



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#2 dc3

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 01:20 PM

You do not format the RAM.

 

There are two types of file system for Windows, FAT32 and NTFS.  NTFS is what is now used for Windows.

 

From your description is sound like you are trying to clone your hdd.  What program did you try to use?


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#3 clayto

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 05:08 PM

I am not referring to the PC's RAM but to RAM disks, a DVD format which originated with Panasonic I believe. Many of my machines are Panasonic and I use Ram discs in our Recorder / Player and mini RAM discs in my camcorder. Unlike other DVDs files on RAM discs can be written, erased, and rewritten over and over again --- just like HDDs.  Quote from my Recorder / Player's Handbook :"Formatting is the process of making media such as DVD-RAM recordable on recording equipment."

 

What about UDF, which articles tell me is replacing NTFS,  and which is the only one offered to me by my Windows 8.1?.  It is not offering me either NTFS or FAT now (it has in the past, for USB drives) --- perhaps because UDF is especially appropriate for CDs / DVDs.

 

The backup software I used first time is part of the Glary Utilities suite. I wont take up space now on what was unsatisfactory about it (my Glary Utilities suite is usually very helpful) as I am now trying to use AOME which I believe is good and fairly simple, but nevertheless I cannot get started with it. Cloning is a separate function in this software and not the same as Backup.

 

AOMI link: www.backup-utility.com

 

clayto



#4 Drew1903

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 05:52 PM

Maybe, he means ROM not, RAM

 

The file format for the burn should, indeed, be NTFS

The native approach is just do simple...
 


Edited by Drew1903, 17 July 2015 - 05:52 PM.


#5 FreeBooter

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 02:13 AM

 Windows XP uses DVD-RAM directly for FAT32-formatted discs only. Windows Vista and later versions of Windows OS is able to write directly to both FAT32- and UDF-formatted DVD-RAM discs from within Windows Explorer. Device drivers or other software are needed for earlier versions of Windows.


Edited by FreeBooter, 18 July 2015 - 05:54 PM.

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#6 clayto

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 05:41 AM

"The file format for the burn should, indeed, be NTFS" ---- but how do I do that when Windows is only offering me the option of formatting to UDF?  I have checked this again just now and that is what is listed, 'Format as UDF'.  The 3 DVDs which have the Glary Backup have my whole system in UDF but Glary now tells me the backup cannot be restored,  responds that they need to be in NTFS.  That is my main complaint about the Glary utility, it should have reported the need for NTFS at the beginning of the backup process, not at the end when I have spent several hours and three DVDs on it!

 

With regard to the RAM DVD discs I do come across computer users who have not heard of them.  When I first used them some years ago in connection with my Panasonic recorder and camcorder, I rather thought that the highly versatile RAM discs would sweep the board, rather than have a multitude of formats such as +R, -R, +RW, -RW, - / + R DL and so on.  I was wrong and RAM did not really take off despite its superiority. (I think people used to say that BetaMax was the best system for recording / playing but we ended up  with the less good but universal VHS.  This has been repeated frequently historically with so many things, from canal widths and railway gauges onwards.  Now it seems that standardisation has been abandoned in favour of new technology which enables flexible devices capable of functioning with a wide variety of formats. Modern computers can run a variety of OS I presume?)

 

clayto



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 07:36 AM

If you have the budget for it I would recommend using a USB external hard drive over DVD disks for doing system backups. You can get a 1TB drive for about $55. This also allows you to easily explore the image using Aoemi Explorer function which lets you mount the image as a virtual drive compared to having the image span multiple disks. This would allow you to copy any file out of image you need.



#8 clayto

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:18 PM

Apart from the cost factor one reason for not getting a USB external Drive is that my PC now (other than my old XP LapTop) is a 10.1 Tablet and I want to keep the clutter of devices around it to a minimum, so as not to too seriously compromise the portability feature of the Tablet. I have a very slim USB external DVD Drive which I leave behind when I move the Tablet to another room (I dont take it out of the house).  My LapTop sprouted external devices over the years (including a USB HD) by WD which I seem to have lost somewhere.  Eventually the LapTop was really 'portable' in name only.

 

If it was possible to install Windows 10 and run from an external Drive I would seriously consider it even so, as shortage of free storage seems the one significant difficulty I have with the W10  upgrade (16 GB required and I have only 5 GB).

 

Another consideration is that I have a stock of unused DVDs dating from some years ago when (before a serious illness stoped me using the computer, etc) I used them in combo with a CamCorder and DVD Recorder / Player, and when I knew more about all this which I am now having to re-learn.  I want to make use of what I have got.

 

Here is a new mystery to me. Wikipedia says " A DVD-R can be written only once, in contrast re-writeable DVD formats such as DVD-RW or DVD+RW which can be rewritten multiple (1000+) times."  Which is what I thought. But today I started to Format some of my DVD-R discs and was given the option of a. either burning once only as a 'normal' DVD or b.using it 'like a USB drive for deleting / re-writing' (like a RAM disc?). And so far that seems how it works, with individual files (instead of the whole disc) being deleted and new ones written. I did not know this was possible, maybe it is a feature of W8?  I have only used XP and predecessors until a few months ago.

 

clayto


Edited by clayto, 18 July 2015 - 12:24 PM.


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:22 PM

Yes, you can make a DVD-R like a USB drive but what happens is when you delete a file it changes the TOC of the disk to hide the file but the file is still there. Eventually you would no longer be able to do anymore writes as the disk keeps filling up with data even though it is not seen.



#10 Drew1903

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 01:47 PM

Apart from the cost factor one reason for not getting a USB external Drive is that my PC now (other than my old XP LapTop) is a 10.1 Tablet and I want to keep the clutter of devices around it to a minimum, so as not to too seriously compromise the portability feature of the Tablet. I have a very slim USB external DVD Drive which I leave behind when I move the Tablet to another room (I dont take it out of the house).  My LapTop sprouted external devices over the years (including a USB HD) by WD which I seem to have lost somewhere.  Eventually the LapTop was really 'portable' in name only.
 
If it was possible to install Windows 10 and run from an external Drive I would seriously consider it even so, as shortage of free storage seems the one significant difficulty I have with the W10  upgrade (16 GB required and I have only 5 GB).
 
Another consideration is that I have a stock of unused DVDs dating from some years ago when (before a serious illness stoped me using the computer, etc) I used them in combo with a CamCorder and DVD Recorder / Player, and when I knew more about all this which I am now having to re-learn.  I want to make use of what I have got.
 
Here is a new mystery to me. Wikipedia says " A DVD-R can be written only once, in contrast re-writeable DVD formats such as DVD-RW or DVD+RW which can be rewritten multiple (1000+) times."  Which is what I thought. But today I started to Format some of my DVD-R discs and was given the option of a. either burning once only as a 'normal' DVD or b.using it 'like a USB drive for deleting / re-writing' (like a RAM disc?). And so far that seems how it works, with individual files (instead of the whole disc) being deleted and new ones written. I did not know this was possible, maybe it is a feature of W8?  I have only used XP and predecessors until a few months ago.
 
clayto


I actually forget if it arose in 8.1 or 7. But, certainly, is another one of the many things that were not in old XP

#11 clayto

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 05:22 AM

Thanks for the information about DVD-R discs potentially filling up with 'deleted' files --- I did not know this.  It confirms my view that RAM discs are the best.

 

clayto 



#12 clayto

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 04:08 AM

I intend to use AOMEI Backupper (free). Does anyone have any experience with this?  Although it may not be so widely known as some alternatives I have read a lot of reviews which are very favourable ---- phrases like "back up of choice, simple and reliable" are common, That sounds like what I need. The program answers some of the questions I have raised above. For example it automatically formats the media to the appropriate file system, and the help desk quickly advised me on the issue of the amount of free storage space the backup will need, depending on the compression selected.

 

I have been using a free AOMEI service for some months, MultCloud, which is a Clouds management website providing transfers between a number of different Clouds along with all the main file functions such as delete, rename, preview (for images).

 

MultCloud: https://www.multcloud.com

 

clayto



#13 srisathvika

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 08:37 AM

I have many files in my system. If i want to take back up, it tooks lot of DVDs. Which is the easy way for this back up?



#14 clayto

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Posted 25 July 2015 - 03:19 PM

I would have thought an effective medium for backup would be a USB Flash Drive (not the DVDs I am intending to use), assuming you are not going for a second internal or external Hard Drive,  You need to get one big enough in GBs to adequately store what you intend to backup. In the UK there are plenty available, their price seems to have come down quite a lot and I am again assuming this also applies to India?

 

With a big enough USB Flash Drive there will be no repeatedly inserting fresh DVDs as the backup proceeds, you will have everything on one storage device, very easy to carry around (including no need for a Writer / Reader) as you just plug in to your PCs USB port(s), reliable, according to most users (I personally have found them less so for some reason), reasonably fast (more so than DVDs), quite robust.  I am almost persuading myself to buy a big capacity USB Drive for carrying out my backup! .

 

A useful tip I have had from AOMEI is that with Backupper's mid level compression setting, your backup should take about half the space of the original files,but they recommend allowing for two-thirds to be sure.

 

I am no expert, I am only just planning my second backup and the first, with a different program, had some problems. Other Forum members with much more expertise may comment and take a different view.  

 

clayto






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