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Fresh Windows 7 Install to New Solid State Drive


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#1 bonnie848

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 09:49 AM

I just bought a solid state drive for my HP laptop. I figured I would do a fresh install of Windows 7 from my HP Windows 7 backup disc. Is this possible? Can someone run me through the steps involved in doing so? Do I need to format the SSD? I was going to break it into 2 partititions of 150GB and 100GB and put the old drive as an archive after.

 

Thanks,

Bonnie



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#2 dc3

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 09:59 AM

A backup disc is meant to be used to basically repair the operating system when it is needed.  It is not an installation disc.

 

I would suggest that you call HP and tell them that you have replaced the hdd and need the installation and driver discs.  They usually will send these to you for free.  if there is a charge it usually isn't very expensive.


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#3 bonnie848

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 10:41 AM

I'm sorry, I used the wrong terminology for the discs. They are the system Recovery discs from HP. I did buy them, I think they were around $20. Is there a way to install to new disc using these? Oh, one other thing, I installed a modded bios a while back so I could use an updated NIC and bluetooth.



#4 Platypus

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 10:53 AM

I don't see any value in using two partitions, but in principle I don't think there should be any reason not to restore from the HP recovery set.

 

I recently used the same procedure to set up a SSD in my Toshiba laptop, except I had a recovery USB flash drive. It asked me if I wanted a custom partition size, I specified the entire 256GB drive and away it went. You probably won't need to prep the drive, such as formatting.

 

I suppose there is a slight possibility a recovery installation could be thrown by a modded BIOS, if it looks for a tattoo that might not be there or similar. Only way to know is to try...


Edited by Platypus, 16 July 2015 - 10:55 AM.

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#5 dc3

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 10:56 AM

The BIOS is not a part of the operating system, it is part of the motherboard.  So installing Windows will not affect it.

 

You will find a very simplified set of instruction at Wikehow.  These instructions include pictures which makes it easier for a first time installer.


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#6 bonnie848

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 12:13 PM

Platypus: According to the HP forums, the sata III drives can only achieve 3G (sata II)  transfer rate, unless the partition is under 160GB, then you will get 6G (sata III) transfer rate.

 

Thanks A...phobia, but those instructions seem to be for a regular installation disk. Is the procedure the same for System Recovery discs (I've never used them, so not sure). Also, I read somewhere that I need to set the bios sata mode to AHCI. Is this true?

 

Thanks for you help guys.



#7 wing987

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 03:37 PM

The SSD should have come with a dumbed down version of backup software, like Acronis, that you can download and get licensed.  Use this to create a duplicate of your hard drive in the computer and onto the SSD.  Ensure you copy EVERYTHING, formats, MBR, partitioning, data, EVERYTHING (you may have to boot off of removable media in order to do so, so be sure you have a disk or thumb drive ready). 

 

After that you must take the old hard drive from your system (carefully power down, disconnect all power, and carefully remove while using an anti-static strap!) and put the new one in the same slot.  If your computer can hold two hard drives, do NOT use the second hard drive bay yet. 

 

Power the computer on.  If the copy was done correctly it will boot up as if nothing happened, if not then you will need to put the original drive back in and try again.  Once you confirm that the hard drive is running properly and operates the computer, then you can power down and add the original drive in the second bay if there was one. 

 

There are many free tools that can help you.  Personally I do not like Acronis b/c it occasionally misses the MBR. However the sheer number of tools that can help are all up for personal preference, and as long as it functions even the most simplistic software works great.


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#8 bonnie848

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 05:41 PM

Yes, but my perference was to install a fresh copy of windows.



#9 Platypus

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 10:14 PM

Platypus: According to the HP forums, the sata III drives can only achieve 3G (sata II)  transfer rate, unless the partition is under 160GB, then you will get 6G (sata III) transfer rate.

Speaking as a technician, I'd expect it to relate to drive size, not partition size. I'd be interested to know what the information is relating to your particular system.

 

As far as I can make out from what I've seen of the issue, HP seems to have done an arbitrary selection on drive size according to a common system specification, and coded that into the firmware. The SATA III capable systems can be purchased with HP approved SSDs up to 160GB, so if a non-HP specified drive larger than this is fitted, the firmware sets SATA II, presumably because HP hasn't tested if the speed of non-approved drives on the interface causes any errors, and theoretically SSDs become faster with size.

 

If this is the scenario, partition size makes no difference (as it should not in any case relating to the SATA standard).


Edited by Platypus, 17 July 2015 - 10:16 PM.

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#10 wing987

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 02:22 PM

if you are doing a fresh install, as in bare bones nothing included Windows 7, then you need the install disk for that. A windows recovery disk will not provide this ability. Your hardware does not matter at that point, it simply will not work the way you are wanting.  If you are restoring a windows image, then we can move forward.  If you have the original bare bones install disk for Windows 7, we can move forward. If you are migrating an existing system to an SSD while retaining your original configuration and setup, we can move forward.  Otherwise we will be trying to install software as a whole, and yet remove software that is included by indistinguishable from the rest during the install.  This is just not possible without extreme expense and skill level....Sorry.


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#11 OldPhil

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 03:40 PM

Being as you have the HP disk I 100% agree on fresh install, IMO don't bother partitioning let the disk do what it needs in the way of partitions.  When done run Dcrapifier, you can select what you want to get rid of.  I just did one of my laptops, recovered quite a bit of space.    


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