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Drive for backup: correct layout?


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#1 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 08:42 AM

I bought a 2TB WD Red HDD which I will put into an enclosure and use it for data backup.

I used Acronis True Image WD Edition to create two FAT32 partitions (~900GB each).

The User Manual of the program says that if a partition is not intended to be used for installing the Operative System then it should be "Logic", not "Primary". So I made both "Logic".

The drive is still empty so I can change things if I need to.

1) Is it a good idea to have two separate partitions?

2) Is it correct to have them as "Logic"?

 

Any feedback will be appreciated.

Thank you 



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#2 mikey11

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 09:35 AM


1) Is it a good idea to have two separate partitions?

 

not unless there is a reason......why do you need the drive partitioned?



#3 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 01:22 PM

I thought that if the filesystem is messed up for some unpredictable reason I would lose all my files in the "single partition" layout, only half of them in the "two partitions" one.

Does it make any sense?

What about the "Logic" thing?



#4 blarg214

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 12:51 AM

The only reason you would need to really partition it is to separate info that you really don't want in the same area, and or if you are doing virtualization.  Or if you wish to have one as read only and or other weird reasons.  Also I hope you mean NTFS because FAT32 only went to 32GB. 



#5 Citizen_WD

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 05:21 AM

Hello,
First of all, I agree with what @blarg214 said, and want to add a couple of points.
 
WD Red is a great HDD but is designed for RAID or NAS environments. I'm not saying that it's a poor choice, but seems the WD Green is the better choice for backup solutions. Whether or not to partition a drive is entirely up to you and this does not affect the corruption of data in general. You can, however, format only one partition and makes it more convenient sometimes. 
 FAT32 can't handle partitions larger than 32GB. If you have a 2TB hard drive, you'll have to divide it into something like 60 separate partitions. No point in doing that, you have to format in NTFS (or other if for example you intend to use on MAC as well). 
 
Hope this was helpful, Citizen_WD


#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:25 AM

As long as you are not using more than 4 partitions on a drive then they are fine being primary. If you have two partitions on a disk you actually have a better chance of recovery if one gets corrupted.



#7 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:26 PM

Thanks to all for replying.
 

Also I hope you mean NTFS because FAT32 only went to 32GB

FAT32 can't handle partitions larger than 32GB


Uhm... that's weird, I am pretty sure I formatted them as FAT32.
According to Wikipedia (if I'm reding it right) FAT32 can handle partitions up to 16TB.
Anyway, I originally went for FAT32 since I wanted a filesystem usable both by Windows and Linux. On a second thought, the 4GB limit for file size could be annoyoing so I think I'll go back to NTFS.

@Citizen_WD
I did a bit of reading before purchasing the drive.
You are right, some prefer to use Greens for backup but there are others who use Reds with no problem at all. I bought the Red for the extra 1-year warranty.

You can, however, format only one partition and makes it more convenient sometimes

That's was the idea.

you have to format in NTFS (or other if for example you intend to use on MAC as well)

Never had (and never will have) a MAC :P
I was interested in a filesystem good for Windows and (possibly) Linux.

@JohnC_21
Thank you for clarifying the Logic vs. Primary doubt.

I think I'll keep the two partitions and make them NTFS Primary.

 



#8 Citizen_WD

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 02:28 AM

Hello again, 
 
​Just tought I'd clear things a bit further about the file systems: Windows can mount and support FAT32 volumes larger than 32 GB (subject to the other limits), but you cannot create a FAT32 volume larger than 32 GB by using the Format tool during Setup. If you need to format a volume that is larger than 32 GB, use the NTFS file system to format it. Some of the hard drive manufacturers have created their own tools for converting a drive which is larger than 32 GB to FAT32. Such is Western Digital (WD) FAT32 Formatting Tool. You can use this tool to accomplish the task, but I'd rather just format in NTFS. Best of luck, Citizen_WD 


#9 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 02:40 PM

I clearly stated in my first post that I used Acronis True Image WD Edition to create the partitions.

I remember exactly now: I created the first partition with True Image but I wasn't able to create the second partition too.

So I switched to W7 and created the second partition but I couldn't format it as FAT32 (only exFAT and NTFS if I remember correctly) so I ended up formatting the second partition in Linux.

 

So True Image can create a FAT32 partition larger than 32GB and GParted can too.

 

Anyway, as soon as I put my hands on it again I'll make both partitions NTFS.



#10 Bailifei

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 09:10 PM

I clearly stated in my first post that I used Acronis True Image WD Edition to create the partitions.

I remember exactly now: I created the first partition with True Image but I wasn't able to create the second partition too.

So I switched to W7 and created the second partition but I couldn't format it as FAT32 (only exFAT and NTFS if I remember correctly) so I ended up formatting the second partition in Linux.

 

So True Image can create a FAT32 partition larger than 32GB and GParted can too.

 

Anyway, as soon as I put my hands on it again I'll make both partitions NTFS.

You can convert a FAT32 partition to a NTFS with free easeus partition master.

And why not convert to GPT disk? There's not that much limit with it.  No need to choose between logical and primary.


Edited by Bailifei, 20 July 2015 - 09:11 PM.


#11 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 06:56 AM

You can convert a FAT32 partition to a NTFS with free easeus partition master

I have used Aomei Partiton Assistant in the past, it's a good piece of software imho.

And why not convert to GPT disk? There's not that much limit with it.  No need to choose between logical and primary.

I might have to use the disk with non-UEFI machines and I don't know if a GPT disk could cause troubles.

#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 08:05 AM

You only need GPT on an external drive if it is over 2TB and there have been reported problems using a 3TB GPT external drive on a computer without UEFI. Strange things happen.


Edited by JohnC_21, 21 July 2015 - 08:05 AM.


#13 The Man from Oahu

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Posted 22 July 2015 - 08:10 AM

That's the reason why I didn't opt for GPT.

OT: I have read that HDDs larger than 2TB fail on a higher rate (something to do with the complexity of the heads). I don't have the knowledge to know if it's true but I bouhgt a 2TB drive for this reason too.






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