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Asus RT-AC87U / RT-AC87R bridge


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#1 theonlybuster

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 07:04 AM

Hey guys, quick question.

My office is expanding.  And by expanding I mean we've purchased the unit next to our existing.  Now the building is not at all connected to our existing office, there's roughly a 20ft space between the 2 buildings. 

 

The original office's wifi is just for cell phones/tablets and 3 desktops in the conference room.  Roughly 15-20 clients on average

In the addtional space, a 4 mobile computers will be set up for the purpose of stock keeping and such, BUT the area is fairly big at 150' x 130'.  No impeding walls, just shelves and such. 

 

Now my plan is to install one wireless router in the office, and another in the additional space (roughly 60ft away through 2 exterior walls) in bridge mode. And thus begins my questioning...

Can the Asus RT-AC87U or R support bridge mode, and additionally does anyone know how reliable it is?  I've been searching online but can't find anything that goes into any detail regarding this. 

 

NOW, if there is a better idea, I'm all ears.  Though I'd rather not lay a pipe underground between the 2 units because the space is very traffic heavy and it will create quite a few problems if this was done.

Keep in mind, the computers in the new unit will be accessing the server within the office to store and retrieve data. 



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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 09:08 AM

Does your current router's signal reach over to that building? With a strong enough signal? If not then you need to correct that first.

 

The router you mentioned has a setting to do what you want.


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#3 theonlybuster

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 09:36 AM

Does your current router's signal reach over to that building? With a strong enough signal? If not then you need to correct that first.

 

The router you mentioned has a setting to do what you want.

Yes, the existing router does reach the next building, and it's a decent usable signal.  It just obviously isn't enough to stretch across the entire building. 

But thanks for the input. 






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