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'Free' Windows 10 Now Looks A Terrible Deal


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 10:26 AM

Windows 10 is famously ‘free’, but Microsoft has been worryingly silent about just how free it really is. Now, only three weeks before release, leaks suggest ‘free’ Windows 10 might not be a good deal at all…

The news comes from ComputerWorld which attained Microsoft internal slides that strongly suggest many Windows 10 owners will have to start paying to receive updates within two years. The key lines ComputerWorld discovered are:

“Revenue allocated is deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the estimated period the software upgrades are expected to be provided by estimated device life…. [The estimated device life] can range from two to four years.”

‘Device life’ is the key phrase here. Microsoft has already stated revenue earned from Windows 10 must be deferred because of the free upgrade model (cash isn’t taken upfront), but it repeatedly stressed Windows 10 owners can expect to get free updates for the “supported lifetime of the device”.

The problem is Microsoft hadn’t defined how long the ‘supported lifetime of the device’ will be and now we see it: “two to four years”.

 

Article

 

I guess will see how it all shakes out over time. Microsoft will need to make money somehow with Windows 10.



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#2 Aura

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 10:27 AM

Windows 10 is only free for a year so at the worst, they will stop making money for a year on it and then start making money again. It's after, when Windows 10 will have the biggest part of the market share that they should do something to make money.

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#3 OldPhil

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 10:38 AM

I thought maybe MS would be going the same route as Apple relying on apps and hardware MS is invested in plus OS sales after the first year.


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#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:11 AM

Windows 10 is only free for a year so at the worst, they will stop making money for a year on it and then start making money again. It's after, when Windows 10 will have the biggest part of the market share that they should do something to make money.

Jeez, I completely forgot about it only being free for one year. Must have had a brainfart on that one. Thanks.



#5 Aura

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:52 AM

All good, a lot of people seems to forget about that :P

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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:54 AM

I don't know why so may people are confused by such a simple point of economics. I have been reading different company's annual reports for years and every single company on the planet Earth amortizes their income and investments. This goes back several centuries to at least the 1600s.


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#7 Starbuck

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:57 AM

Windows 10 is only free for a year so at the worst, they will stop making money for a year on it and then start making money again.

It seems that a lot of people have this misconception of Win10.
The upgrade from Win7 sp1 and Win8.1 is free for a year.
Any other system.... you will have to pay for it.

After the year is up..... there will be no charge to keep using Win10.

Windows 10 will not have an annual fee. Windows 10 will not charge you a yearly subscription after the free-for-one-year upgrade offer expires. Microsoft's Gabe Aul took it to Twitter just the other day to reiterate this point, after one Twitter user asked him to be clear.

Unfortunately, Microsoft may have confused people by mentioning Windows 10 "as a service" causing people to believe there will be a subscription fee of sorts. There is no subscription model for Windows 10. Instead, Windows 10 "as a service" simply implies that Microsoft plans to update the operating system with smaller, more frequent updates, rather than larger Service Pack-like updates. Think of it like an app that gets updated regularly.

"Once a qualified Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it up to date for the supported lifetime of the device, keeping it more secure, and introducing new features and functionality over time – for no additional charge," Microsoft clarified.


http://www.winbeta.org/news/stopping-fud-there-no-yearly-subscription-fee-windows-10

This is more than a one-time upgrade: once a Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it current for the supported lifetime of the device – at no cost. With Windows 10, the experience will evolve and get even better over time.

http://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2015/01/21/the-next-generation-of-windows-windows-10/


Windows 10 is famously ‘free’, but Microsoft has been worryingly silent about just how free it really is.

No they haven't.
Microsoft's Gabe Aul has spelt this out numerous times.

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#8 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 05:16 PM

Starbuck is absolutely correct.


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#9 Drew1903

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 05:33 PM

What is stated is being skewed into something it is not, not based upon & not based on any new concept.  When the average age of machines currently running 7 SP1 & 8.1 is factored into the equation, there is an average estimate as to roughly after what period of time many will be seeking new hardware... @ which time Win10 would have to be PURCHASED.  Plus the FREE offer is ONLY, ONLY to current 7 SP1 & 8.1 owners AND for ONLY, ONLY, 1 year!!...That is not bloody everybody or forever!!!

All it is speaking to is the expected "life of a Device" ON AVERAGE, means an amount that can be calculated & projected.  MS reckons round about then, there will be necessary sales of the OS.  S-A-L-E-S.  (Subscription is not even spelled the same nor sound anything like sales or service, plus it was always clearly stated that's one of things makes Windows 10 Platform special is the 'service' comes along with  sale, ad infinitum)..  Due to new hardware purchases, whole boxes or components.... technology advances, prices come down, stuff wears out, any number of reasons including always & constantly new, off-the-shelf, preloaded OEMs bought...  & some of the FEW machines which, TOOK* the free OS... will be making changes, likely, also.
 

* Some won't take the Upgrade w/in the 12 month term which, costs MS nothing, when the opportunity is offered & not used.
 

The is no damn talk of subscription.  It's now & henceforth the same bleeding model as Apple... buy the OS & along come Updates w/ it as a free service.

Those who said the above are correct,  People have, "well how does MS Make money?"  BY SELLING STUFF!  Same as always.  The company sells OSs & other software.  It, also, offers some web services via subscription fees.  Windows Updates IS NOT ONE OF THOSE services.  It comes along w/ BUYING the OS.

Nothing unreasonable...
In 2 or 3 yrs. Microsoft expects to sell Windows 10 to at least some of the same people to whom it had given it for "Free of the life of the device".

^ Commenting on the obvious.  No reason to be extracting subscription from it.  Has nothing to do w/ scribing to anything.

Accuracy is a must.  As a MS Partner & IT Pro & MS Licensing Cert. leaving things skewed is not helpful or productive.


Edited by Drew1903, 10 July 2015 - 06:10 PM.


#10 brainout

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 07:24 PM

The debate in that Computerworld article is about 'supported lifetime of the device' (emphasis added).  Maybe because most folks aren't lawyers but some like the writer of that article have a legal frame of mind, the debate understandably lingers.

 

A clever lawyer in court could easily say, "'Supported'?  By who?  Microsoft?  The manufacturer of the device?"  See, supported lifetime is not the same as plain ol' LIFETIME.  If it said 'for the lifetime of the device' without 'supported', then the common-sense legal rule of interpretation means, as long as the device WORKS.  But 'supported' throws a monkey wrench into the whole claim, so that now it's a question of WHO SUPPORTS the device, no longer about how long the device itself, lives.

 

So if now 'two to four years' is the rule, that's shorter than the normal 5+5 rule MS has historically followed, so the article's worry, is apt.  Then it means that MSFT itself interprets 'supported lifetime' to mean its OWN support, not the manufacturer.  Or, is crafting its own definition of support based on presumptions that the manufacturer itself will stop support in two to four years, depending on the type of device.

 

Hope this clarifies why such an article is written.  I didn't like the article, read it sometime yesterday or this morning, because I don't think MSFT is attempting subterfuge.  I have a lot of complaints about MSFT, but they aren't along the lines of MSFT is an evil liar or something like that.  I just find their interfaces and explanations, horrific and incompetent.  This article however brings up that flaw of bad explanation.  MSFT should realize it's caused a lot of suffering, so should expect distrust.  I for one have a lot of difficulty trusting in anything new it offers, now.  I do not have a problem with paying for what MSFT offers.  I do have a problem, with what it offers, as usually the offering wrecks my machines and my time.


Edited by brainout, 10 July 2015 - 07:35 PM.

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#11 Norseman143

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 07:41 PM

I have a question

 

If you get the free 10 version. And after the free time is up

 

Something catastrophic happens and you have to reload your Windows, in my case 8.1. Would you then, have to pay for it?



#12 Drew1903

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 08:24 PM

I have a question

 

If you get the free 10 version. And after the free time is up

 

Something catastrophic happens and you have to reload your Windows, in my case 8.1. Would you then, have to pay for it?

No.  In so much that you would have burnt a DVD from your Win10 ISO.  Once past the catastrophe, presuming ,still, the same machine, would just Custom install using said DVD.  Or the ISO in some bootable form.... as long as to the same machine in which the Upgrade was done.... has to have had Upgrade 1st (Been eligible).

 

No, as long as reloaded to the same machine as the Upgrade was done on originally.
 


Edited by Drew1903, 10 July 2015 - 08:25 PM.


#13 Platypus

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 09:17 PM

I thought maybe MS would be going the same route as Apple relying on apps and hardware MS is invested in plus OS sales after the first year.

That sounds right to me. I maintain a friend's home recording studio running Pro Tools HD on a G5 Power PC. His OS X and Pro Tools are updated as fully as is  possible, but OS X no longer supports Power PC. If he wants to update further and stay on the Apple platform, he must buy a current Apple, so he's buying a new OS X as well as the hardware purchase.

 

I don't see why Microsoft wouldn't be able to do similar, with the cutoff for being able to get updates being controlled by the eligibility of the device rather than the OS version as now. Say instead of XP not getting updates, then Vista not getting updates, Core II level and equivalent CPU systems stop getting updates, then 1st generation i series stop getting updates...

 

Like Apple and Win XP users, if the system is still useful once it stops getting the updates, the owner can keep using it. So if my spare Core II Duo HP laptop that was happy with a Win7 upgrade also likes Win10, but in 2 years time MS says no more updates for Core II devices, it just stops getting updates, and if I'm happy to keep using it in that state I can. But if I want two fully updated Windows laptops I go out and buy a current one with a new Win10.

 

That's my guess anyway.


Edited by Platypus, 10 July 2015 - 09:20 PM.

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#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 09:43 PM

Interesting, so end of support is not based on a future date but rather on the hardware used. Possibly at update 10.8, for example, any CPU based before i3 would no longer be updated. If that means no security updates then I would migrate that computer to linux before I would get rid of it because Microsoft thinks I should buy new hardware. Today's CPU's have more than enough power for the average user. 



#15 old rocker

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 10:04 PM

Sorry folks... Isn't it about time that we stop all the self interpretations, and atop trying to be the authority on a subject we are all learning together?

 

Many, Many folks cruise to this site seeking information not found anywhere else on the web,

 

Yes... that is the reputation of BLEEPING COMPUTER!

 

FACTS and HONESTY... NOT ; I'M The Authority!

 

Believe me folks... In the (IT / TECHNICAL WORLD...) No one is an Authority!

 

Unfortunately, this Windows 10 Forum has gone off the rails in mostly the wrong direction!

Suddenly... everyone is an authority in Windows 10 and none of us really know for sure, other than what we have seen and experienced ourselves as WINDOWS INSIDERS!

 

Most are not even in the The Fast Ring, but will grab Any Leaked Build from Any Source and start blabbing out opinions!

 

That is just Wrong!

 

Unless you are one of the following persons... Terry Myerson, Gabe Aul or Satya Nadella... You don't know for sure (other than personal testing of the Windows 10 Preview) the TRUE GUTS Of WINDOWS 10.

 

a. How it will be distributed,

 

b. What the true cost will be in the long run,

 

c. What determines lifespan support for a particular system.

 

Stop all the misleading information, and wait for Microsoft to set the parameters.

 

Just because some website stated what they deem to be as fact... Doesn't Make It Gospel!

 

Sorry if I offended anyone, but the time has come to put a lid on all the Baloney!

 

Software under development is just that UNDER DEVELOPMENT and is subject to change on a moments notice!

 

Terms and Conditions May Apply!

 

Rock On :guitar: My Friends!






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