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Dell inspiron - Dell recovery system


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#1 troublednewfie

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 11:58 PM

I just bought a Dell Inspiron.  I know very little about androids.  Dell keeps on wanting me to install/update a Dell recovery system.  Should I try to ignore this?  Will this cost me money after a trial period?  Thanks


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 08 July 2015 - 05:24 PM.
Moved from 'Introductions' to Win 8/8.1'


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#2 paul88ks

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 12:13 AM

Did you buy your Dell New?The recovery system is usually part of a Dell computer.It enables you to recover your operating system in the event of a crash. What does android have to do with your issue? Unless there is a specific page that tells you there will be a charge,I wouldn't think so ,unless they are wanting you to upload to the "Cloud". Can you be more specific?

What is your operating System?


Edited by paul88ks, 07 July 2015 - 12:15 AM.


#3 jhayz

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:57 AM

Dell keeps on wanting me to install/update a Dell recovery system.  Should I try to ignore this?  Will this cost me money after a trial period?

 

The message might be referring as a reminder to create your recovery discs or by a flash drive. This by all means is free as it serves to be your backup operating system in case your hard drive is not usable and needs replacement. Your computer has a readily installed Windows operating system, a recovery partition (usually the D drive) containing the OS files and when you need to factory restore or reinstall your laptop (check the manual for this part) and the one time only creation of a recovery discs either by a DVD or a USB flash drive. http://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/19/SLN114921/EN


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#4 troublednewfie

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Posted 08 July 2015 - 12:29 AM

Thanks for your help!  I will download the recovery system.  As for a few of the questions, I am not sure that I can answer them.  The operating system is windows 8.  Although I know what 'cloud' means, I really don't get the concept and have never used it before.  I went from windows vista system that was 7 years old to the new computer and am very lost with it.  I will figure it out eventually.  Once again, thanks.



#5 paul88ks

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Posted 08 July 2015 - 12:59 AM

All the 'Cloud" means is that you can save all your files,pictures,music,etc to a computer(server) that is operated and maintained by an outside company,via the internet. Microsoft does this with their new "One Drive" which is a part of the new Windows 10 Operating System.That is just one example.Google,and many other companies offer this service.Some are free,and some charge a fee for the amount of storage that you want. It is one way of backing up your data,as well as synchronizing all your devices- Android phone,IPhone,Computer ,Tablet. "Cloud"not really a cloud but a way of backing up your info at a remote location! We use them here for uploading photos to Photobucket.com as well as a few others.It may or may not be something you are interested in doing.However,learning how to do backups on your computer is very important -Essential- if your computer ever crashes.There is a ton of information on BC on how to do backups! All the best,and happy computing!



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 08 July 2015 - 05:47 PM

First of all, Troublednewfie - welcome to BC !

 

Thanks for the info in post #4. Since this topic never belonged in 'Introductions' I have moved it to the relevant section which is 'Win 8/8.1'.

 

To clarify Paul's remarks. Once upon a time when you bought a computer, along with it you were given a handful of CDs or DVDs which contained the software that had been pre-installed on it.

 

Then the builders, Dell among them, started installing a 'recovery' copy of the installation software on a section of the hard drive as this was much cheaper for them than giving out discs. You were then advised to make a 'recovery' copy on DVDs of the original installation so that in the event of disaster you could rebuild the computer to an 'ex works' condition. Since quite a few modern computers no longer have CD/DVD drives you are now advised - for these models at least - to use a fairly large, typically 32GB, memory stick for the job. It is a good idea to make this 'recovery' backup as soon as you buy the computer.

 

This is a one time job that will restore your computer to an 'ex-works' condition in the event, for example, of a hard drive failure. It will do nothing for the data you create with the computer.

 

As Paul also said - backing up your own work is critically important. By this we mean documents such as correspondence, college projects and so on, photos, music, artwork. In short anything that you have created or saved on the computer should be saved to external media on a regular basis. What you use to save it on is far less important than that you do save it to external media. By external media I mean things like DVDs, memory sticks, external hard drives. What you use depends on how much data you have to store. Doing backups is a lot cheaper than having to pay some specialist firm to try and salvage data after a disaster

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 troublednewfie

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Posted 08 July 2015 - 09:00 PM

Thanks for the advice.  I will back up soon using a large memory stick that I have.  I am find that going from vista to explorer 8 with aps rather difficult.  Aps want to download constantly and I am unsure as to what is bad/not needed or what I should be downloading.  I've gone thru some of the tutorial with Dell and it is pretty useless to me.  Any suggestion of where I could get a good tutorial on-line for Dell inspiron? 



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 05:54 PM

I don't think it is the Inspiron itself for which you need guidance, more the operating system. At the end of the day, a Dell is just another computer with an 'On' switch and either a mouse or trackpad and a keyboard - depending on which Inspiron you have.

 

This brings us to the question of which operating system do you have - 8 or 8.1 ?  To find out, take your cursor to the top right hand corner of the screen and click on the 'Search' symbol; type 'control' into the search box and click on 'Control panel' in the list that the search will produce. Then click on 'System' and you will see exactly what OS you have. If your computer has Win 8 installed I would advise you get the 8.1 update - a free if rather large download from MS - you will find it more conventional in its appearance although it is possible to get Win 8 to boot to the desktop instead of the so-called 'Modern interface'.

 

As for instruction manuals for Windows I always feel happy recommending either of the 'For dummies' or An Idiot's guide' series. They are both available as e-books if that is your preference and they are both well and clearly written, make explicit their assumptions about your skill level and have a welcome touch of humour.

 

As for the 'apps' presented on tiles in the 'modern interface' you can safely ignore or delete any of these you either don't use or don't need, install your favourite software and carry on working pretty much in the manner to which you have been accustomed.

 

Chris Cosgrove






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