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"scanner" vs. "book scanner"


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#1 Alchemist

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:04 PM

Does the expensive, larger "book scanner" have any real advantage over a standard flatbed scanner? Couldn't you just get a stand of some sort to give the same amount of clearance when putting a book on the flatbed scanner? Or is there something else about a "book scanner" other than the same mechanical parts in a larger plastic case?



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#2 TheJokerz

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:08 PM

I work for a law firm that does a lot of research at library's and what not, we use a handheld scanner and have had pretty good luck with it.  This is the model that they use.

 

http://www.amazon.com/IRIScan-Executive-Wireless-Portable-Scanner/dp/B00D02A82K/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1436213254&sr=8-4&keywords=handheld+book+scanner



#3 themaninthejar

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:08 PM

don't know what type of book scanner your looking at but one used for archiving compensates for the bend at the spine of the book



#4 Orange Blossom

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:16 PM

A standard flatbed scanner is great for paper, and maybe very thin books that open flat. However, the thicker the book the greater the problems:

1) You cannot get the pages flat without breaking the binding; hence, text near the binding edge up to 2 inches is shadowed and even completely obscured.

2) If the book is thick enough, the top to the scanner cannot go down far enough, and the image is compromised by light leaking in from the environment. It's somewhat akin to xeroxing a page with the lid up.

3) The mechanical components of scanner itself can be damaged if too many thick books are scanned. I've seen too many scanners with the lids broken because of this. By broken, they won't close down for anything. Repair isn't cheap if it can be fixed even.

So, if you're planning on scanning a bunch of books, get a scanner suited to the job.

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#5 Alchemist

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:48 PM

These are "book scanners" on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Plustek-OpticBook-3800-Book-Scanner/dp/B005AHBGZ6/

http://www.amazon.com/Plustek-OpticBook-4800-Book-Scanner/dp/B0059DZ4W2/

They are much thicker, but otherwise look like pretty much like standard flatbed scanners which are much cheaper. Such as:

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Office-Products-LiDE120-Scanner/dp/B00LN0NUOO/

So why couldn't I get a stand of some sort to hold the standard flatbed up a bit and make it work with those thick books?

#6 YeahBleeping

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 08:53 AM

I think this video here explains it best. As well as explained above the ' gully shadow'  from the book's inseam requires image manipulation (fixing the dark shadow) and if the words go deep into the crease or reaches the ends of the pages you are looking at significant image manipulation as the OCR software may not pick up the words.  So you are costing yourself time If the words go too far into the seam than you cant put it on a flat bed scanner and have it reach the scanning bed.  They cost a lot for a reason, they are intended for large library image capture and doing it right the first time.  The handheld scanner suggested by TheJoker may well work just fine too in some respects but it cannot equal the speed and uniformity of the scanner in the video. (IMO)






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