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oil submerged pc ideas


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#1 superking75

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 07:38 PM

Ok I really don't know were to pit this, but here i go.

 

I have a acer one d255e, and a dell dimention 4550, both old, slow, crapy pc's. And I have seen a lot on putting pc's in oil.

I would like to experiment with this. But i was wondering witch pc would work better and what I would have to do to it to make it work.   



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#2 jburd1800

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 09:04 PM

Why or what would that do? Just curious cause I've never heard of it...


“May the sun bring you new energy by day, may the moon softly restore you by night, may the rain wash away your worries, may the breeze blow new strength into your being, may you walk gently thorugh the world and know it's beauty all the days of your life.”


#3 saw101

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 10:09 PM

http://www.instructables.com/id/Mineral-Oil-Submerged-PC/

 

Someone here might have some experience in oil submersion, but it's not me. Closest I've ever come was dropping a greasy french fry on my keyboard. Have to admit though it does look interesting. I have a couple of running older comps laying around & will give some thought to trying it out. It would certainly make for some interesting conversation. If I do, I'll be sure to post some pics. Now if I can only locate some fish that like swimming in mineral oil!


I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#4 technonymous

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 10:32 PM

Gotta be out of your mind to put a used computer into a 10 gallon tank of $400 dollars worth of mineral oil. LOL Now if it was a $3-4K overlocked gaming rig then I would say sure! Laptop submerged in there forget it. It'll destroy the screen, hd, cdrom etc. Basically anything you don't want oil in. There might be a cool way to take the LCD screen and shrinkwrap the whole thing and silicon seal it shut and put on a Fish tank screen saver. :) Digital fish in mineral oil.



#5 Condobloke

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 10:49 PM


Condobloke

Outback Australian  

 

fed up with Windows antics...??

 

LINUX IS THE ANSWER

 

I USE LINUX MINT EXCLUSIVELY... NO DUAL BOOT, NO VIRTUAL MACHINE

 

 

 Failure is not an option. It comes bundled with your Microsoft product.

 

 

 


#6 PuReinSAniTY

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 01:26 AM

hmm...interesting....


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#7 superking75

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 02:34 PM

Ok one main thing, I would use vegetable oil not mineral oil. Two I would try to take it apart before putting it in in. It would be more of an experiment/ something to brag about than something to really use.

 

By the way this is more for ideas, I am not doing anything at this moment.    But as I said it is an experiment, It probably will not have radiators so It would  get used for 10 min before being turned off.

 

Any way I think I am going to use the acer because it is small and the dell is huge.



#8 mjd420nova

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 09:05 PM

This is not an undertaking by a DIY amateur.  Just using water cooling "kills" more systems when leaks develop but they are only cooling the CPU chip.  Seems a big waste of money and time.  Vegetable oil is worse than mineral oil, more impurities, more conductive. 



#9 YeahBleeping

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 11:02 AM

My 2 cents.  I ran with a DIY water cooled PC for over 10 years now.  I handed it down to my son when he needed one for school and (just last week) built/bought him a new one.

 

The old sucker still ran fine except I think the video card died and rather than put more money into it I retired the beast.  I am planing on sticking it up for sale on craigslist later this week or next.  Anyway I never heard of one 'leaking and killing a computer'  And mine never leaked a bit.  Of course I put cool auto shutoff quick-disconnects on the pump.  Used a chevy chevette heater core for the RAD and a tube type reservoir as back when I was building it they didn't even have the kits you can buy today.  I can't remember the water block brand.  It's only been the past year when corrosion started to build up on the tubes and reservoir (probably from the anti fungus stuff I put in every now and then) And I only used distilled water in the res.  Just saying there is certainly nothing wrong with water cooling it's just not my bag anymore.  And I am sure my PC has 'lived' this long on a dual core E6600 overclocked to 4.1ghz is attributed to my water cooled system and not air.

 

The mineral oil is an interesting method of cooling for sure but I consider it impractical and only for the 'cool/neato' factor.  There was a post on the board somewhere about a guy who lived in extreme moisture environment where I thought a mineral oil pc would maybe be the way to go to keep corrosion down.  But I am not sure where that thread is.  The fact is Air coolers have come an EXTREMELY long way since the day I started building pc's and many of them are certainly 'good enough' if you want to over clock -cough Noctua Noctua

 

Just my 2   Oh I forgot to add.. do not use vegetable oil there are too many impurities and you will most definitely blow something


Edited by YeahBleeping, 07 July 2015 - 11:12 AM.


#10 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 06:50 PM

This article from 'the Register' might be of some interest, it's a year old but . . .

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/06/04/liquid_cooling_server_heat/

 

Chris Cosgrove



#11 Ram4x4

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 05:36 PM

This is certainly not a new idea.  In addition to oil immersion, there was also deionized water immersion as well. 

 

Potential problems with immersion set ups should be obvious.  Leaks, separating equipment to be immersed vs not immersed, desk/floor space, cost.

 

Regardless of the cooling system you choose for your PC, the physics remain.   You are removing heat from one medium and transferring it to another, and perhaps across several mediums, but in all cases, the end medium is always air. 

 

Air coolers are the obvious base set up.  A heatsink to gather the heat from the chip and transfer it to the air by dissipating it over large surface area of the fins.  A fan helps speed that process.

 

Water coolers work no differently.  They use water to carry heat from the chip into a radiator where fans blow through to speed transfer of heat to the air. Water cooling provides advantages with space constraints as the radiator can be external and as as large as you want.   Air coolers are limited to the size of the heatsink you can mount in the case.   Water cooling also makes it easier to add cooling blocks to things like video cards, RAM and even hard drives if so inclined.

 

It is this reason I don't understand this "new thing" about self-contained water loops with tiny radiators with a single fan on them.  In some cases these little radiators are smaller than the heatsink of a good air cooler.  In fact, if you look at the performance of many of these small water units, they are actually worse than most of the good air coolers and it isn't surprising.  That's not to say they are bad, they just aren't as good.  

 

To make a water loop that's effective you need to take advantage of the ability to have your radiator outside the case with no space constraints.  The "idea" behind water cooling is to use waters faster heat dissipation abilities to get the heat off the chip, then move it somewhere you can dissipate it quicker to the air.  The more radiator you have, the more heat you can dissipate because as mentioned, in the end you are always dissipating your heat to the air, so the bigger your heatsink, the more you can dissipate efficiently.

 

Of course, noise is always a factor.  Note the fans and speeds that many of the small closed water loop units have.  120mm fans spinning in excess of 2000-2200RPM.  They're noisy, but they have to be.  They're attempting to dissipate the same heat through what amounts to a smaller heatsink, so the trade off is more air, which in turn means a faster turning fan.  At that point, why spend the extra money, have the associated potential risks and just put a faster spinning fan on a good air cooler?

 

When you think of water cooling, think big radiator(s) with slower turning, larger fans.  That way you gain better cooling capacity and low noise.  There really is no substitute for heatsink/radiator surface area as you always end up dissipating to air in the end....unless you can stand the noise of high speed, high CFM fans.

 

The downside to water cooling is space to mount the radiators and fans somewhere on or near the PC and the associated issues with pumping water through and around electrical equipment/parts.  I personally only advocate water cooling for someone doing extreme overclocking who needs the ability to dissipate higher amounts of heat, and even for modern chips, there are a few air coolers that do very well even with moderately overclocked systems.  Water loops are expensive, especially proper ones.  Some folks incorrectly believe they need a water cooler when all they really need is better case flow (remember, an air cooler is dissipating the heat from the CPU inside the case, so good case flow is needed to get the heat out and cool air in).

 

Oil/water immersion provides the ability to cool the entire motherboard, meaning chipset, cpu, video, ram, etc (all the parts that can go in the medium), but in the end, the result is the same...you still have to dissipate the heat and you will do it to air.  That immersed system will need a pump and radiators and so you are back in the same boat.  You may, may not have to make accommodations to cool the parts that can't get immersed, like mechanical hard drives, optical drives, etc.  The complexities around immersion are even greater than water loops and likely more costly with little to no added benefit.

 

We can go beyond water and immersion and look at phase change and peltier based cooling as well.  Phase change is basically a refrigerated cold plate.  It uses a compressor and coolant exactly in the same way your refrigerator does.  There is no doubt these systems will perform better than air, water or immersion, but at an extreme cost, both in terms of money and complexity.  Condensation is always an issue with phase change and are noisy, both the fans and compressor (remember, they still use a radiator and fans to dissipate to air).  They are also very expensive.

 

Peltier chips came onto the scene for a while and all sorts of contraptions were created around them, but ultimately they are very inefficient, difficult to work with, expensive and the issues with them just aren't worth it.  If you don't know what a peltier is, it's basically a chip/wafer device that uses electricity to "pump" the heat from one side of the chip to the other.  The idea is that the cold side gets really cold, and it does...but...to make a Peltier work requires a separate power supply to power the chip and they use huge amounts of energy, lots of amps.  That energy put into it emerges as heat on the hot side, so in addition to dissipating the heat from the device to be cooled, you now also have to take account the added heat from the power put into the Peltier to run it...and I mean we're talking a LOT of extra energy which means a lot of extra heat.  Your heatsink/radiator/fan set up would be massive...way more than for making a good water loop.  Since the cold side of the Peltier goes below ambient, you also have condensation issues, just like with phase change. 

 

It is possible to size your Peltier and it's cooling range to stay just above dew points of ambient to avoid condensation, but that means tedious temp/humidity measurements that can vary quite a bit day-to-day.  It's also possible to water cool the hot side of the peltier, but peltiers work best when the hot side is...well...hot.  The "operating range" recommendations for the hot side on most peltiers is well above the boiling point of water anyway.

 

So, to sum it up:

 

Air cooling is the best solution in terms of performance and cost for probably 95%-98% of all PC owners, especially with the coolers available today.

 

Water loops are a viable set up for extreme overclockers and provides the ability to cool other parts of the system that may need it in that overclocked environment, like RAM or chipsets.  I would still recommend a very good air cooler for moderate overclockers.  If you aren't pushing your CPU to very high limits, but still have heat issues, chances are it's your case flow.  Water is an expensive fix that's not necessary in that scenario and may mask heat issues with other components of the system. 

 

Immersion is strictly for the tinkerer and the "wow" factor.  There is nothing you can do with immersion you can't do with air or water loops that will make much, if any difference in the end.

 

Phase change is for someone looking to go really extreme and also has the wallet to afford it (not to mention the ability to withstand the noise).

 

Peltiers are extremely niche.  I say that only because there are still folks out there using them and trying to reinvent the wheel, and in most cases discovering what those before them discovered; peltiers are expensive, energy hungry and ultimately more trouble than any benefits they provide.



#12 Corporal_Canada

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 02:16 PM

hi.. i once had an oil submerged pc... but i took it out (let the oil ooze out and gave it to someone in a very poor country  , also because i noticed that  ALL the oil was heating up.. and try as i might, i couldnt find an pump strong enough to cycle the oil through a radiator to cool it down... . i would very much like to do this to my main pc, IF i find a good pump that can run 24/7 , can anyone link one 4 me pls ?



#13 Ridernyc

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 05:13 PM

I don't think this is an experiment that can be successful on a budget.

 

It's one of those ideas that can seem deceptively simple but cause huge issues.

 

Just the weight of that much oil is going to shock you,  Let alone containing it. 

 

And even if you go with the cheapest oil you can find on the market it's going to be very pricey.



#14 cavemanwhite

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 03:08 PM

Just got remember as most dont realize, once your components are submerged in mineral oil that is the only way in which to continue to use them optimally. 



#15 Ram4x4

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 06:54 PM

Try deionized water if you're hell bent on submersing your PC. Much easier to pump and cheaper too.




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