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Setting up small LAN please help!


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#1 juanodiy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 09:04 AM

Hi there, I am new to the work force, recently I've been given a task to set up a small network with just two computers to a server, thing is I am not really sure how to do it, I would like to search for some help of the people in this community who I know they have deep knowledge and experience, first of all, the idea is to connect two computers to a server so in total will be three machines connected, internet connection is not needed so I want to know 
1.what kind of architecture should I use, 
2.do I need a hub?, 
3.how can I set up the IP addresses for both server and clients, by that I mean do I need to design the subnet IP's and what's a good advice
4.what about the subnet masks?

by the way the server will be running windows, thanks in advance for you help!



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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 09:07 AM

Are they connecting to the internet?


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#3 juanodiy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 10:11 AM

Are they connecting to the internet?

No, they won't be connecting to the internet



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 01:51 PM

For quick and easy I'd recommend using a router it will do everything you need.  This will remove DHCP as an issue and if you need Internet access later it won't be difficult to set up, plus gives you an option to go wireless.

 

1.  Architecture - with a router you could go either wired (speed would be determined by the equipment) or wireless.

2.  No, a router would be the best choice.

3.  A router can handle DHCP so you don't have to worry about IP addressing.

4.  With DHCP you don't need to worry about subnet masks, and with three devices it isn't worth worrying about.



#5 CaveDweller2

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 02:43 PM

I agree with Kilroy. Only thing I'd add is spend the little extra and get a gigabit router. Might as well enjoy the speed and unless the PCs are like 8 or 9 years old they'll have 10/100/1000 cards in them.


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#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 03:34 PM

Sorry guys but adding a router really doesn't help in this situation.

 

juanodiy what you want is three workstations. All the steps I am giving you can be googled for the complete how to's.

 

1. logon to each workstation as administrator [ set the same password for each pc for each admin account]

 

2. Assign them ipv4 ip addresses as follows [google how to assign ip address in windows [version]]:

PC1 = 192.168.0.10 subnet mask 255.255.255.0 no gateway or dns entries

PC2 = 192.168.0.11 subnet mask 255.255.255.0 no gateway or dns entries

PC3 = 192.168.0.12 subnet mask 255.255.255.0 no gateway or dns entries

 

3. put them in the same workgroup [google how do I setup a workgroup in windows (version)]

 

4. On the PC you want to be the "server" setup  a shared folder.  Don't use any existing folders but create a new one called Shared off of C:\.  Give "everyone" full control access [google....how to setup a share]

 

You are basically done.  I do recommend you create "backup" accounts on each pc that are administrator equals and you create user accounts for those using the pcs on every pc.  Their passwords have to match across each pc.

 

Google how to network for more info and training.

 

You can get a 5 port switch [they don't make hubs anymore] for like $25.  That and three network cables and you are ready hardware wise.


Edited by Wand3r3r, 05 July 2015 - 03:35 PM.


#7 Kilroy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 04:06 PM

Sorry, Wand3r3r a router is a better solution, both for now and the future.  You don't have to worry about static IP addresses, can add Internet access easily, and with a wireless router can use wireless.

 

Additionally you set the lowest level of security that works.  No one needs full access, at most they need read/write.

 

Additionally all computers, or at a minimum the server, needs to have the same user and passwords.  So, computer 1 would have User1, computer 2 would have User2 and the server would have User1 and User2.

 

It will be easier to address your questions as they come up, but there is a lot to setting up a client server environment.  There are week long courses to teach people just server administration.



#8 juanodiy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 06:57 PM

Guys thanks for your help is awesome how much knowledge can be shared, In the case that the clients need to transfer files among them probably FTP, do I need to have static IP's or a DHCP would do?, furthermore, how am I suppose to set up the router in the case that I get a router? or just plugin it to the machines would set it up automatically? I mean would I need to go to the router IP address and move something there? Thanks!



#9 Kilroy

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 09:15 PM

You should be either using Windows File shares or Samba, not FTP.

 

With a router you will just need to do basic configuration, setting the passwords.  Then connect the equipment and the devices will pull addresses via DHCP from the router.

 

From the questions you're asking you need to learn a lot about networking.  This project is way above your current skill level.



#10 juanodiy

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 12:14 AM

Thanks for reply, I know is above skill level but I need to start from somewhere, why not FTP?



#11 CaveDweller2

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 02:24 AM

You'll pay more for a router than you will for a switch but either will be just fine. With a router there will be less setup on the PCs and more on the router. With a switch you'll have to setup the PCs like Wand3r3r laid out and just plug them into the switch. Make sure you get Cat6 patch cables, in whatever length and color you want =)

 

FTP is more something you do outside of LANs for the most part. Setting up simple shares with username and passwords is much easier. The server is it going to be running server OS or it's just a server by name cause that's where your files will saved?

 

 


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#12 Kilroy

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 06:25 AM

You can get a router for not much more than the switch.  For the extra $10 the router is a better purchase.

 

Part of your problem is your limited knowledge of networking.  As CaveDweller2 said FTP is normally used externally.  FTP requires a computer to be running an FTP service, not something you normally do on a client.  Using file shares is much easier.

 

Networking can either make things simpler or much more complicated, depending on how it is implemented.  With your limited knowledge you're going to much better off with a router.  You don't have to use all of the features at once and can implement more as you need them.  The more setup on the router isn't as much as the setup on PCs, unless you want to use the advanced features.

 

I suggest listening to the Security Now! podcasts.  You can pick the topics that interest you first, they have episodes on routers and other things.



#13 juanodiy

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 07:59 AM

You can get a router for not much more than the switch.  For the extra $10 the router is a better purchase.

 

Part of your problem is your limited knowledge of networking.  As CaveDweller2 said FTP is normally used externally.  FTP requires a computer to be running an FTP service, not something you normally do on a client.  Using file shares is much easier.

 

Networking can either make things simpler or much more complicated, depending on how it is implemented.  With your limited knowledge you're going to much better off with a router.  You don't have to use all of the features at once and can implement more as you need them.  The more setup on the router isn't as much as the setup on PCs, unless you want to use the advanced features.

 

I suggest listening to the Security Now! podcasts.  You can pick the topics that interest you first, they have episodes on routers and other things.

Kilroy  thanks for the podcast I added to my library  CaveDweller2  that pretty much depends on me, now the situation has changed a little so I am no sure if whether I should use a server OS or just a windows 7 would do  

 

 

Thanks to everybody for supporting my learning process, I appreciate so much the time you put on this and your vast knowledge, now I have a more clear idea of what I need to do, as for the replies I received, I suggest the following scenario to the OP, 3 PC's acting as hosts will be connecting to a server, now the data shared between hosts and server need to be backed up, for this I consider using a cloud service and a physical hard drive, this meaning that now the server need to have access to the internet, so I am thinking on this, 
 
1. Using a router ( wifi router NETGEAR)
2. As the files will be send and stored into the server, a DHCP server will work, what I am not sure if is  the DHCP provider should be the router or the server
3. a FTP server is discarded due to it wouldn't be necessary 
4. I am planning to use cloudberry to do regular backups and use amazon s3 to store into the cloud
5. the IP of the router is 192.168.15.1, so then i will have to assign a static IP like 192.168.15.11 to the server and the host having dynamic IP's?
6. Just one of the hosts should also have access to the internet ( using a proxy?)
 
what do you think about this? is it correct? thanks again

Edited by juanodiy, 06 July 2015 - 10:40 AM.


#14 Wand3r3r

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 11:01 AM

How did you go from no internet to using internet cloud based services? Why, if bringing internet service into the network, would you only have one host connecting to it?

 

What I suggested was a simple peer to peer network setup.  It is the simplest to setup but it can be a challenge for someone unfamiliar with networking. This is also the reason I left off a router and recommended only a switch.  Much simpler to static assign your ip addresses then logging into and configuring a router.

 

But you keep mentioning a "server" as in a client/server setup.  You also mention more complex concepts of FTP and using a proxy.  You also don't mention any kind of budget.  A server running a server OS is not cheap in either hardware or software nor is it simple

 

Unclear how you would know about these when you don't know how to setup a simple home network. It also seems strange that you, with no experience, are advising someone in the company on how to setup a network.

 

What kind of business is this?  What are its computing needs?  You know what software's you want to run?



#15 YeahBleeping

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 12:42 PM

Sounds like your doing someones' homework to me lol






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