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System Restore


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#1 Draumalfr

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 06:05 AM

My computer no longer does automatic updates, and it's now addicted to AV software, it's had so much. It's time for a system restore.
The question--What is the difference between one partition and two partitions of the hard drive?: What should I choose and why? I have an ASUS K53E laptop--Windows 7.



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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 06:21 AM

Repeatedly press F9 during boot up to get the recovery partition.


Edited by OldPhil, 02 July 2015 - 07:19 AM.

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#3 Draumalfr

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 06:31 AM

Typical of any kind of forum, I don't know where I should write my answer--it's almost never clear. The answer is yes.I run Bitdefender and Malwarebytes. I've done this for a very long time and have not encountered this problem before. One of the main issues of updates is Bitdefender, and the auto pilot setting is frequently turned off automatically: this suggests it is more of a malware problem. If I have to remove one of my AVs, I would probably stay with Malwarebytes, but I don't think it covers everything.



#4 OldPhil

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:04 AM

RP my bad.


Edited by OldPhil, 02 July 2015 - 07:15 AM.

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#5 Draumalfr

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:06 AM

Wow!!! Thanks to PC World. It's amazing what you can find when you search for it.

 

Why Partitioning Your Hard Drive Makes Sense

Most PCs come from the factory with a single partition on their hard drive, meaning that it shows up as one drive in the Computer window (as C:, typically). But keeping your data, applications, and operating system on the same partition can be risky because, if something happens to the partition's index file (the file that tells your computer where the various pieces of your data are located), your computer won't be able to boot up off that drive--and even if you boot up with a recovery disc or external drive, you won't be able to access the rest of your data.

One drive, three partitions.185941-capture3_original.jpg

Partitioning your hard drive essentially tells your computer to treat portions of that drive as separate entities. If you keep your system and apps on a partition separate from your data (documents, music, video, and the like), the data will be easier to back up (because your backup utility won't bother to copy the system and apps, which you can reinstall from the discs or redownload from an online source). In addition, you'll be less likely to lose your data in an accident; and if you ever need to reformat and reinstall Windows, you won't have to worry about restoring your data backups.

You can also set up an emergency partition. Suppose that Windows unexpectedly croaks and you don't have your emergency boot disc handy. If you've created a bootable partition that's large enough to contain a stripped-down OS and a handful of diagnostic tools, you can use it to rescue your data and salvage your computer. Some computer manufacturers (Lenovo, for example) supply a built-in emergency partition on some of their PCs, but you can make your own, if your PC lacks one.

Finally, partitioning lets you try out other operating systems--like Linux, for example. Generally, two operating systems can't coexist on the same volume without stepping on one another's toes, so you won't be able to dual-boot Linux or ease into Windows 7 if you're on a single-volume system.



#6 OldPhil

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:20 AM

Check post #2


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#7 Draumalfr

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:31 AM

Sorry, don't get which is post #2 now, and I really don't get RP my bad. I'm assuming that it looks like I should do a system restore, but should I re-download both Bitdefender and Malwarebytes: my searching has only discovered that the jury is well and truly out regarding that--I have MWB pro installed. I'm just going offline, I may be some time.



#8 OldPhil

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:35 AM

F9 at boot up will bring you to system restore if you wish to do it.


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#9 wing987

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 02:37 PM

Draumalfr,

     Thank you for requesting help. However it seems that you are using multiple forums to get your help, and as a result we are seeing only part of the information.  Each post you have made seems to reference some instructions or materials and steps that have not been provided to you. Although I am not against helping, if you still need help can you please remain on topic without referencing what other sites have mentioned? This can assist in receiving proper assistance, as well as help us identify what is going wrong on your system.

     Additionally, since everything that you do to the system can have repercussions beyond what is easily visible, can you please choose one forum to work with, and then continue to work with ONLY that forum until the problem is resolved? Please let us know if you still need assistance and have chosen bleepingcomputer.com to help you.

 

Yes, partitions are a good thing when used properly. Yes, most computers now have a hidden recovery partition that you can make visible if you know how.  Yes, we can walk you through the recovery process if you choose to use that option.  But, be aware that YES, you can completely mess up your computer if you do not approach this carefully.


-- Windows 7 Ultimate on custom built system, Windows 10 on under powered laptop. Sophos UTM 9, Ubuntu Server and Windows Server 2008 R2. HyperV Virtualization --

 

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