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Ubuntu BusyBox Concern


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#1 GameMaster

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 10:07 PM

Hello,

I recently made a live USB of Ubuntu 14.04.2 (64-bit) and tried having it boot on my laptop, it went to BusyBox instead. I then typed "exit" at the prompt, thinking it would get me out of the CLI, but instead it started creating things like a swap partition. I'm concerned that I may have wrote files to my laptop's hard drive unintentionally. The laptop is working fine though, but I'm not sure if it could have overwritten something that has yet to cause problems. Does anyone have an idea of what it wrote to, if it did anything? I don't need help with getting a live USB of Ubuntu working though, switching flash drives fixed it. Thanks.


Edited by GameMaster, 29 June 2015 - 10:10 PM.


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#2 Al1000

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:50 AM

Hi,

You can check what partitions your computer has by booting up with your live USB and running this command in a terminal:
sudo parted -l
That will simply list your computer's partitions in the terminal, and if there's a swap partition it will say so.

Edited by Al1000, 30 June 2015 - 01:50 AM.


#3 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 09:39 AM

Hi,

You can check what partitions your computer has by booting up with your live USB and running this command in a terminal:

sudo parted -l
That will simply list your computer's partitions in the terminal, and if there's a swap partition it will say so.

 

 

Before doing that though, make sure your internal hard drive is mounted! If you are booting off a flash drive it may not mount it automatically. You can just double click it to mount it if you see it in the unity launcher on the left, that should do the trick. Then run A1000's command after that.


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#4 Al1000

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 10:06 AM

Before doing that though, make sure your internal hard drive is mounted!

What difference does that make?

The output seems to be the same regardless of whether any file systems on the internal hard drive are mounted or not.

#5 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 12:42 PM

 

Before doing that though, make sure your internal hard drive is mounted!

What difference does that make?

The output seems to be the same regardless of whether any file systems on the internal hard drive are mounted or not.

 

 

Ah okay then. Disregard my post then. I was thinking it wouldn't come up with the internal drive configuration unless it was mounted... but thinking about it I guess that doesn't make sense. Certain actions have to be taken with the drive not mounted (like formatting it, etc).

My apologies with the incorrect information.


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#6 GameMaster

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 12:59 PM

Hello,

 

I ran the command and have included the output below:

 

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo parted -l

Model: ATA TOSHIBA MK2555GS (scsi)

Disk /dev/sda: 250GB

Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B

Partition Table: msdos

 

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags

1 1049kB 210MB 209MB primary ntfs boot

2 210MB 237GB 237GB primary ntfs

3 237GB 250GB 12.7GB primary ntfs

 

 

Model: Kingston DataTraveler 2.0 (scsi)

Disk /dev/sdb: 7756MB

Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B

Partition Table: msdos

 

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags

1 32.3kB 7756MB 7756MB primary fat32 boot

 

 

Model: SanDisk Ultra (scsi)

Disk /dev/sdc: 31.1GB

Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B

Partition Table: msdos

 

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags

1 1049kB 31.1GB 31.1GB primary fat32 boot, lba

 

 

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$  

 

-----------------------------

 

The Kingston DataTraveler is the working live USB drive (the one from which Ubuntu was running from).

 

The SanDisk Ultra was the non-working live USB drive (one which redirected me to BusyBox and I typed "exit").

 

The Toshiba drive must be my laptop's internal hard drive.

 

 

 

I then checked Disk Management in Windows 7 to see if what the parted command outputted matched up and it somewhat did (there seems to be minor size differences).

 

eRo3eTF.png

 

 

Also, that's okay, DeimosChaos.  :)


Edited by GameMaster, 30 June 2015 - 01:04 PM.


#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:04 PM

Doesn't look like you wrote anything to the main Toshiba drive. It has the three partitions, all NTFS, no Linux ext4 (or other Linux formats) in there.
The size difference is probably just the way Linux reads the drive compared to how Windows does. It isn't very far off from each other anyway.


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#8 GameMaster

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:06 PM

I wonder why it said it was creating stuff, though. Odd. Anyhow, thank you for your help.



#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:10 PM

I am not to sure on that. It may have been trying to create the swap partition on the removable drive for some reason. Apparently you can load Ubuntu into RAM, so maybe it did that by itself and tried making changes to the flash drive. All random speculation on my part though.


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#10 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:48 PM

I then checked Disk Management in Windows 7 to see if what the parted command outputted matched up and it somewhat did (there seems to be minor size differences).


Not everyone agrees on the definition of what a gigabyte, megabyte, kilobyte, etc are. On Linux often GB (gigabyte) is 1,000,000,000 bytes and GiB (gibibyte) means 1,073,741,824 bytes. On Windows GB (gigabyte) is 1,073,741,824 bytes.

(12.7GB x 1 000 000 000) / 1 073 741 824 = 11.82779669761658 GiB (or Windows GB).

(209MB x 1 000 000) / 1 048 576 = 199.3179321289063 MiB (or Windows MB).

(237GB x 1 000 000 000) / 1 073 741 824 = 220.7234501838684 GiB (or Windows GB)

As you can see the outputs still aren't exactly the same, though they are closer. I'm not sure if Parted or the windows Disk Management tool do any rounding when calculating, but I suspect that might account for the remaining minor differences.
 

#11 Al1000

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 02:47 PM

Ah okay then. Disregard my post then. I was thinking it wouldn't come up with the internal drive configuration unless it was mounted... but thinking about it I guess that doesn't make sense. Certain actions have to be taken with the drive not mounted (like formatting it, etc).

My apologies with the incorrect information.


No problem at all. Thanks for the explanation. I also searched the man pages on parted for instances of 'mount;' I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. :)

#12 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 03:18 PM

 

Ah okay then. Disregard my post then. I was thinking it wouldn't come up with the internal drive configuration unless it was mounted... but thinking about it I guess that doesn't make sense. Certain actions have to be taken with the drive not mounted (like formatting it, etc).

My apologies with the incorrect information.


No problem at all. Thanks for the explanation. I also searched the man pages on parted for instances of 'mount;' I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. :)

 

 

All good, thanks for clearing it up and doing the extra research to make sure!


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 01:50 AM


 

 

Not everyone agrees on the definition of what a gigabyte, megabyte, kilobyte, etc are. On Linux often GB (gigabyte) is 1,000,000,000 bytes and GiB (gibibyte) means 1,073,741,824 bytes. On Windows GB (gigabyte) is 1,073,741,824 bytes.

 

This is because of how retailers, and the retail packaging of hard drives, advertises say a 1TiB HDD/SSD as such. After formatting, this is greatly reduced, to around 931.51GB usable space. That's why when I upgraded to a 1TiB HDD to have a larger /home partition for Linux Mint 17.1, and split the drive evenly to have half for /home & the rest for Windows partitions, the result was 465.74GiB. 

 

Screenshot--dev-sda%20-%20GParted.png

 

If the OEM's of drives & the retailers of such would advertise their true values, this would likely be a non-issue. Unlike RAM, where when one gets say a 2GB stick, that's what's there (except for hardware reserved), the same with (most) dedicated graphics cards. I had to throw the 'most' in there, because of a stunt that NVIDIA pulled a year or so back, selling cards with 3.5GB RAM as having 4GB. 

 

Even the documentation on the OEM sites states that a GB=1 million bytes. Yet the package does not on the front, and some consumers will leave bad feedback over this issue alone, feeling robbed. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 02 July 2015 - 01:54 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 NickAu

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 01:56 AM

GiB is the correct number of Bytes in a GigaByte.

 

GB on the other hand was invented so Drive makers could claim larger storage space on their products.



#15 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 02:57 AM

GiB is the correct number of Bytes in a GigaByte.

 

GB on the other hand was invented so Drive makers could claim larger storage space on their products.

 

Yes, they're cheating consumers out of what we're paying for, on the other hand, anyone whom has performed a few installs, or opened GParted, Disk Management or a partitioning tool, should see this. I've known it for years, though it was in 2010 that I discovered the details when purchasing my first 1TiB HDD. 

 

Plus, inside of the retail package, or on the back of it in very fine print, this information is given, and some may have it printed on the label on the front of the drive or included CD, depending on drive brand & when sold. This keeps the drive OEM's from getting sued, by providing this information. 

 

Just looked, kind of surprised, it says nothing on or in the package in regards to this of my 120GiB Samsung 850 EVO, yet does in the documentation inside the included CD (docs & software). 

 

I'm just glad that the RAM OEM's doesn't resort to these tactics, nor most GPU OEM's. I'm sure that following the backlash over a very expensive NVIDIA 3.5GB card that was supposed to be 4GB, they've learned a lesson and have cleaned up their act. The only issue with RAM, is not that they're misleading anyone, different computer OEM's reserves varying amounts of memory for hardware, such as onboard graphics & audio, and the usable amount is what's shown. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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