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#1 Klinkaroo

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 09:54 AM

I was wondering could anyone give me a step by step instuction on how to dual boot Linux (Ubuntu) and windows XP Home. I already have home installed... was wondering if there is a way to spare it when I install Linux. I don't want to run from a live cd.

I am planning on getting a laptop soon so if possible no suggestions that involve installing linux on a second hardrive.

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#2 Joedude

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 01:17 PM

On the Ubuntu CD's / DVD's (I'm assuming you've downloaded the ISO's from UBuntu) You just install it.

1. In Windows - Disk Clean up
2. Disk Defrag
3. Install Ubuntu (just put the disk in and reboot, although this isn't even necessary, Ubuntu will start the whole process from the windows desktop).
4. Answer the questions
5. Decide whether to let Ubuntu divide the drive up equally, erase everything and just put Ubuntu on, use only free space or manually set the partition perameters.
6. Sit back and relax, everything else is pretty much auto from there.
7. Pay attention at reboot, you now have a new boot loader called "Lilo" select whatever OS you want and go to town. By default, Ubuntu is 1st, followed by about 3 or 4 options, then it has a section called other OS's, Windows will be listed there, at the bottom, where it belongs.It's an interactive text interface, use the up and down arrows to select your boot each time you fire that puppy up/restart.

Does that sound easy enough for you? It should auto detect all your hardware (well supported hardware anyway (Ubuntu has a page on their site you can check your stuff with, as well as a tool on installation that will check it)). When you start up Ubuntu, you'll find the sound, video and network should all ready have been set up. Some *nix's do this, others require you to tweak the settings a bit.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#3 Klinkaroo

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 05:43 PM

Ok so when I put the ubuntu disk in and reboot I install it like I would on an empty Hardrive... but when I select the partitions I only use example the rest of the space...

What should I say exactely for the hardrive partitioning thing?


Yeah windows does deserve to be at the bottom.

#4 Joedude

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 02:47 AM

Set up a small swap partition...say, no less than 500MB to no more than 1 gig. Then have it set up a linux3 partition, as big as you like. The swapfile partition will be marked as swapfile, mark the linux 3 partition as the OS partiion. hda1 is where your windows will stay. If you wish to keep windows, don't mess with that partition.

On second thought, You may have to re-divide up the space. Your entire drive may initially start as hda1. Make sure you know how much memory you have in windows and set partitions accordingly. Here's what I did.

My wife loves XP, so it has to stay on. I knew I have an 80Gb HD. Windows was taking up about 40 Gb of that.
On installation, Ubuntu told me all of my HD was NTFS Windows XP.
I resized the hda1 to 40 Gb
created a 1Gb Swapfile
Created a 39Gb Linux3 file system.

Ubuntu formatted them then asked where I would like the OS installed, Select the linux 3 partition. Then click install OS. You should be done.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#5 Klinkaroo

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 09:54 AM

Ok thanks for the info I really appreciate it.

#6 acidburned

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 11:59 PM

if you want your xp to be able to read from the linux partition you need to format them fat32.if you want to set up your linux partitons i would go with 3 of them, 1 for root i give mine 10gb,then a swap of 512mb,then a third one called home can be the rest of the space on the drive.if you have a home one,and if you need to reinstall you wont loose your files and stuff.




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