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I Just Installed Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela Mate...


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#16 cat1092

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 03:57 AM

Rocky, here's the last tutorial that I used to install Google Earth & it worked fine.

 

http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/1710

 

4 Terminal lines total. 

 

Hope that this is helpful! :thumbup2:

 

Also, the mixing of different DE's can cause a lot of issues, I once tried adding Cinnamon to MATE like this & it just didn't pan out. The Cinnamon DE would crash at times. Tried KDE a couple of times, it just wasn't quite my cup of tea. That's why there's so many different distros, a taste for everyone. :)

 

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Edited by cat1092, 22 June 2015 - 04:01 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


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#17 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 08:46 AM

Thanks for all of the advice Cat. If I see that I am having problems with the combination of distros "under one roof" then I think that I will just start all over and give Ubuntu a try. I have really been itching to try that distro. I just built this machine a couple of months ago with fairly high end parts, Intel Haswell CPU and 16 GB RAM and all kinds of neat parts. I built this PC to be my little toy so I am just playing with various OSes until I pick one. Thanks again.


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#18 cat1092

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 03:16 AM

In that case then, the above tutorial should also install Google Earth on Ubuntu, most of the configuration is the same. 

 

In fact, Linux Mint and a lot of other OS's use Ubuntu as the base for their distros. 

 

Be sure that when you start & before updating, to activate the Firewall in the same manner as Mint by typing or copy/paste the below line, press Enter & type in your password, like Linux Mint, you won't see movement in the Terminal when doing this. 

 

sudo ufw enable

 

The Terminal should now show that the 'Firewall is enabled and will run on system startup'. Now you can proceed to update your OS. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#19 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 08:06 AM

Thanks, I will definately do that. I did not get any firewall advice when I first went to Linux and I ran for about a week without any firewall in place. When I installed 17.2, I installed the firewall immeadiately. I will always keep that advice in mind when ever I install a new distro. Thanks again.


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#20 pcpunk

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 05:29 PM

I suggest going back to 17.1, activating Firewall, do updates and installing Timeshift>take a snapshot>setup pc>take another snapshot, and on and on so you don't loose your work each time.  You should keep your first two snapshots around till death IMO, lol, you will need them trust me.  You like to play and test! awesome, but don't loose your work every time because Timeshift is so easy to use, and most here are using it - so you have support.  Keep on breaking things, or else you an't learning!


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#21 cat1092

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:06 AM

 

 

Keep on breaking things, or else you an't learning!

 

Well, there's a good & bad to that, as long as one has the backups, as you've suggested, one can get their OS back in a hurry. The only good thing about breaking a distro & not having backups is that one learns how to install at a much faster pace. :P

 

The bad is when there are no backups (we've both been there) & had to start all over. Actually I never 'broke' a Linux OS in the last 3-4 years until I started changing hardware last year, in the last couple of weeks, graphics drivers on Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon on my MSI notebook broke the OS three times. While the Michael Marley PPA's are excellent for those with recent cards, for those with older ones, the XOrg ones are more compatible & there's a PPA for this also that has as close to the latest as possible while having improved reliability. 

 

I'm doing some changing of things on that notebook & it's unlikely that Cinnamon will go back on there, am setting this one up for my wife to use with Mint MATE 17.1 & making a playtoy out of the Toshiba. It's now dropped to the 4th newest computer that I have, and time for it to go into 'beta' status, a testbed to try new things on. I believe that my wife will enjoy the graphics of the MSI better, since it has a discrete card, and more power under the hood (a i5-480M vs the i3-370M that the Toshiba has). Still, it will be a good computer for years to come, and should have no issues with running the next 2-3 LTS versions. Though it's getting some wear & tear (late 2010 model), and I'm not crazy about a keyboard replacement when a wireless one does just as good & it also needs a battery that runs at an average of $50 (one of the 12 cell models). 

 

I agree that going back to Mint 17.1 is a good idea, of course anyone is free to take any distro desired for a spin, this is the only way that one will find 'the one' that's their favorite, and when that day comes, it'll be known & fast. Most everyone that I know who runs Linux has expressed this same thing, they'll run across a distro & fall in love with it. That's when the real learning begins, once that special distro is found. By then, the install basis are fairly in place, I believe that pcpunk can vouch for this, it was the same for me. 

 

Rocky, something tells me that you're going to be really good at running Linux OS's at some point, and will come to love the overall security & flexibility provided. Just hang in there, and take the bad days with the good.  :thumbup2:

 

Remember that we all went down the same path, finding our identity in the world of Linux, and yes, breaking an OS here & there.

 

It's just another part of the learning experience.  :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#22 paul88ks

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 01:41 AM

I am having some issues with 17.2 as well. The wireless internet keeps dropping,and I could not open a PDF file tonight with Document Viewer. I still have "Cinnamon"installed on a small partition,and I will test these issues with that OS. I wish I had Timeshift backups of Mate 17.1 but I don't. However,I do have all my docs,pictures and Music backed up,so it would not be a huge headache to reinstall Mate 17.1 which is by far my favorite,it just worked all the time. I am a recent Linux user myself,since January 15 or so,so I am still learning.PC Punk told me about Timeshift,which is an invaluable tool. I just didn't know about it soon enough,or if I did I forgot.

 

Cat is probably one of the most knowledgeable guys I know when it comes to Linux,so when he talks -I usually listen! Hope you don't have too much trouble in the future!



#23 cat1092

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 12:40 AM

 

 

so it would not be a huge headache to reinstall Mate 17.1 which is by far my favorite,it just worked all the time. I am a recent Linux user myself,since January 15 or so,so I am still learning

 

Linux MInt MATE (formerly Gnome) has worked for me perfectly fine for over 6 years now (since version 7 or 'Gloria'), and is more compatible with some things over the Cinnamon/KDE editions. Have also used the XFCE version on older computers & on one not too old one, that shipped just as Windows 7 released SP1 for the OS. It shipped with a wimpy Pentium dual core CPU, and after installing the 64 bit version of XFCE, it ran at least 3x faster than new! Had it been on a new SSD, would have been 15-20x faster, but I couldn't get her to come off the money ($65 for a 120GiB Samsung 840 EVO on promo). I paid over $100 for the same SSD in late 2013, that's what the 250GiB 850 EVO's are running on promo for. 

 

Would have installed MATE, which would have ran just as great, only she (an elderly lady) didn't want all of the bundled MATE software, just the essentials & Google Chrome. That's all she wanted & I just couldn't get over the performance difference, neither could she, and the best part, all of that never ending Windows maintenance was flushed down the toilet. Anyone whom thinks that Windows 7 is a 'lite' OS has evidently not ran it on low spec hardware. This is where MATE or XFCE comes to the rescue. :thumbup2:

 

 

 

.PC Punk told me about Timeshift,which is an invaluable tool. I just didn't know about it soon enough,or if I did I forgot.

 

Yes, Timeshift is indeed a great tool, and it was Nick whom introduced it to us on the forum, along with Aptik before that. However, Timeshift beats Aptik hands down & is easy to use. One just needs an extra drive that's formatted as ext4 for it to work, Timeshift isn't compatible with NTFS or FAT32 partitions. I took an old 80GB SATA-1 HDD that was removed from an old computer & used GParted to make two ext4 partitions across the drive for my notebooks & used an older 60GB SATA-1 HDD to make one ext4 partition for my main PC. It works well for backup of the main partition, I use other software to image my Data drive, half of it is for Linux Mint /home, and the rest are Windows partitions. 

 

Really, once Linux Mint MATE is setup the way one likes it, and doesn't horse around with every tweak someone posts, the OS will be reliable for the next LTS release comes along. Now that the Mint team are updating using the same base in Ubuntu 14.04, this is a sweet deal, regardless of which flavor one chooses. I choose MATE for low maintenance & high reliability, and this doesn't require me to know an extensive amount about Linux to run. As long at one can find the shutdown & restart options, as well as sleep & hibernate if needed, and can use Firefox (default browser), Google Chrome or Opera, that covers the majority of users. Plus a fully functional Office suite for when a document or whatever needs to be created. 

 

Plus they provide a guide that by default, shows at boot, which provides the answers to many common questions. Anyone whom can run Windows or Mac can also do the same with Linux Mint MATE, 

 

The Linux Mint MATE edition is used by home/student users & professionals alike worldwide. While Cinnamon is showing as being the most popular, because it's a drop in replacement for Windows 7, it's more for enthusiasts, because it requires more tuning to make some things work as it should, and long term MATE users will often find difficulty in adjusting, as I also did in KDE as well. 

 

It's as nice of an OS as one could want, unless they're fond of the Windows 8 OS, in which case Ubuntu has an attractive offering to appease these users with the Unity desktop. Fortunately, Microsoft has seen the light & knows this is an utter failure, sales figures doesn't lie, unlike usage stats, which can be fudged. Ubuntu has also offered an official MATE edition based on the latest Ubuntu, the initial LTS version is not an official one, yet attracted enough users to realize that it was the right thing to do by doing so, to hopefully gain back some lost usershare.

 

While I'll admit my bias towards Linux Mint MATE, at the same time also realize that the Linux world isn't a 'one size fits all', and this isn't restricted to distros based upon Ubuntu. There are may that are not, though what makes Ubuntu & their derivatives popular is the ease of install, lots of tutorials & available assistance, and runs on a wide variety of hardware. At least one non-PAE version of Ubuntu (12.04) runs fine on older computers that lacks the feature & is supported until April 2017. By then, many of these computers are going to be in need of some major hardware upgrades to move on to releases of today. For some, maybe a $20 or less CPU on eBay will be all that's needed to run for a few more years. Check compatibility before purchasing anything. All P4's (or AMD equivalent) doesn't fit in all sockets. 

 

If in doubt, please post a Topic & we'll do our best to answer any hardware upgrade concerns to keep your computer going as long as possible. This, I do have some experience with. Am not much into advanced coding. 

 

Cat 


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#24 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 06:25 PM

This new build is working fine except that I lost a program. I "installed" Google Earth through the software manager but I can't seem to find it anywhere. Also, I downloaded all of the elements of KDE 17.1 and I am working at customizing my Linux experience. Lots of fun.

 

 

I guess that I kind of made a Frankenstein out of my Mate 17.2 RC, so I just completely deleted the whole thing and installed Cinammon 17.2. I am going to be using this distro for awhile, but I am still playing and still learning, so I might change up again. I am having issues with Windows, so I am mainly using Linux for all of my daily tasks.


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#25 paul88ks

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 07:32 PM

I had to wipe my partition with 17.2 RC. It completely locked up -FROZE- on me.After I reinstalled Mate 17.1 and had to go back and completely install grub again-not just update,but completely.I don't know why!Maybe because I increased the size of the Mint install to 150 gigs. I am getting ready to reformat the final third of my drive and install Ubuntu Studio. Then this computer will go out into the studio and by then I will have my Samsung out of lawaway! 



#26 cat1092

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 12:10 AM

Paul, is it a Samsung with Windows preinstalled or Chromebook? Samsung has entered into an agreement with Google to build & distribute these, and it could be good for both parties. Remember that Chromebook users are Linux ones too, as they're powered by a customized Linux OS. 

 

The reason I ask, is that Samsung has removed themselves from distributing Windows notebooks, of course there's units that likely still unsold & why I ask. I will say this upfront, don't try installing a Linux OS onto a Samsung notebook with Windows preinstalled, the chance of turning it into a brick is very high, as they've had many firmware issues since they started distributing these with Windows 8, as well as some late Windows 7 OS's before then. These computers are notorious for this bricking when a Linux OS is installed. You have been advised about this, it's up to you what you do with your computer & taking the chance of a Linux install is on your hands (& wallet). That's why I can't install Linux Mint 17.1 on my Samsung Series 7 (Speccy specs are in my sig below), unless I disable SecureBoot, UEFI & initialize the SSD as a MBR one. Then the chance of bricking is greatly lowered, yet not eliminated. I'm not giving up the benefits of GPT on another computer, made a huge mistake on my main one in thinking that GPT & Secure Boot was an inseparable bundle, didn't realize that just disabling Secure Boot was enough to install Windows 7 & Linux Mint, and wasn't a member here at the time. 

 

Should I need to reinstall the OS that shipped with the XPS 8700, will revert to GPT defaults & reinstall the other OS's. GPT has a speed advantage over MBR, it's about a lot more than the lifting of the 4 Primary partition limit. That's why I left it on the Samsung, just disabled Secure Boot, if only I knew this in late 2013, could have saved myself a lot of troubles & retained some performance as well. 

 

That's what's dogged Samsung's notebooks sales so bad that they had to exit the market, are firmware issues causing consumer frustration. Note that unless this is an issue concerning the OS installed when purchased, there will be up to a $350 fee for the 'unbricking' of computers where Linux OS's were installed. On the other hand, if you were to get a rare Windows 7 or 8 model not upgraded to 8.1, that upgrade is covered under the warranty. Furthermore, there's no guarantee that it can be unbricked, though they'll still charge you the fee for their time & ship the unit back to you. If successful, it still takes 2 to 4 weeks to get the computer back. These units are also tricky to self service, for example, there's no solid SATA connection in place for when one wants to swap to a SSD, it's a flimsy connector that has to be handled like eggs, hanging by a just as flimsy wire. I intend on seeing if there's an optical drive bay converter, and see if it performs at the same SATA-3 speed, if so, will do it that way in the future. The native connection will withstand only so many disconnects/reconnects of drives. 

 

I also suggest that you open the Settings and enable the Battery Life extender, this makes your inbuilt battery last up to 2x longer, limits the max charge to 80%, and to disable Fast Boot, if not, it'll always feel hot near the top center. This is because it never fully shuts down. Disabling Fast Boot, which by chance is a Windows 8 gimmick, will allow your computer to completely shut down, in turn helping you prolong the life of the components by a long time. A computer is a machine, and like others, needs a shutdown when not in use. Would you consider placing your musical instruments in a hybrid sleep? Some of these components gets hot during use also, especially any amplifiers, and needs that full shutdown to cool off. It makes no sense to keep a computer at near operating temps in a sleep after use for the sole purpose of what they call a fast boot that in many instances, isn't fast at all. 

 

Otherwise, the only time it fully shuts down, and that's because it has to to apply the updates and only momentarily, is the reboot after Patch Tuesday. 

 

One last thing, if you decide to add an SSD, it's best to disable the Express Cache (an ultra small SSD soldered to the MB), otherwise your SSD speeds will suffer. I never seen any benefit to the Express Cache, the computer was slow as dirt, even after a reinstall & it on. It's designed to take the place of a hybrid SSD, yet on many units, the iSSD is so small (8GB), when paired to a 5400rpm HDD, there's no real benefit, and like I stated, slowed my Crucial M550 down badly when enabled. Too bad it didn't at least have a 24GB one in there, if so, it could be used to install the OS, or maybe a Linux OS if it weren't for the bricking risk. 

 

Let us know which model you have, and I'll further research any issues for you. :)

 

Good Luck with the Samsung! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#27 paul88ks

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 12:48 AM

Cat- thanks for the Heads Up!- the Samsung is not a laptop or Chromebook- I have the paperwork here somewhere- I'm just to tired to try and find it at the moment- it is an All-in-One with a Wireless keyboard and mouse.24" monitor. Since it is in layaway at a pawn shop,they said I could always change my mind and get something else. I am not sure whether it is Win8 or 8.1 but it looked almost NEW.I mentioned somewhere else on the forum that some parts on the stand were still wrapped in plastic.I will post the info ASAP! 

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/331583047974?lpid=82&chn=ps   heres what it is- I just googled it! I'm paying a little above half that price,so I thought it was a good deal! If you think otherwise -please let me know!


Edited by paul88ks, 01 July 2015 - 12:54 AM.


#28 cat1092

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 01:42 AM

Yes, it's also a Samsung Series 7, so chances are it has the same firmware issues as mine. 

 

Keep in mind that AIO type of PC's are basically oversized notebooks with a monitor, the HDD could be a 2.5" or 3.5" one, and the cooling & power is just like that of a laptop. You'll likely get a 120W power brick, since it has the larger monitor, other than that, and a possible 3.5" HDD, it's all notebook components. Generally speaking, the only components that can be replaced in AIO PC's are the RAM & HDD, of any brand, and I never want another of the type. 

 

And unfortunately, you likely won't be able to install any Linux version on it w/out disabling Secure Boot & running in pure Legacy Mode, and the risk of bricking still is present. 

 

The notebooks runs hot enough as is, with the 3rd gen i7 Ivy Bridge CPU, which is a killer one for a notebook, but still, the firmware issues are something that you must consider. It was when many took the 8.1 Upgrade from Windows 8 (you'll have to by January 12, 2016 or be out of support) that the firmware issues reared it's ugly head. 

 

Note that the only reason that I have one was for doing a bit of computer work for a relative. She gets a new notebook every 2-3 years, and I usually get the last one for setting up the new, which saves me a fortune in hardware costs. No, I would never had purchased that notebook, it was targeted towards Mac users to jump to Windows, and the firmware issues caused their campaign to fail. While most of what Samsung lays their hands on turns into gold, computers was one of the few that didn't, with units shipped slipping in both 2013 & 2014. 

 

If you want my opinion, I say get something else, at the same time, that's your decision. Yet I did want you to know about the firmware issues that's plagued Samsung for a couple of years, to the point they're no longer releasing new Windows notebooks. Yet they'll honor the warranty of any purchased from retailers. 

 

I also suggest to avoid AIO type of PC's as a whole, these tends to run hotter than regular desktop PC's, the end result being a shorter lifespan. 

 

Here's some reviews of the computer on the Amazon site. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-DP700A3D-A01US-23-Inch-Touchscreen-Desktop/product-reviews/B0098NTF8S

 

Good Luck in deciding what to do! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#29 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 05:50 AM

rocky@rocky-All-Series ~ $ inxi -Fxz
System:    Host: rocky-All-Series Kernel: 3.16.0-38-generic x86_64 (64 bit, gcc: 4.8.2)
           Desktop: Cinnamon 2.6.11  Distro: Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela
Machine:   System: ASUS product: All Series
           Mobo: ASUSTeK model: Z97-A version: Rev 1.xx Bios: American Megatrends version: 2012 date: 09/30/2014
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i5-4690 CPU (-MCP-) cache: 6144 KB flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 27983.9
           Clock Speeds: 1: 3837.558 MHz 2: 3899.492 MHz 3: 3891.699 MHz 4: 3899.902 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Intel Xeon E3-1200 v3/4th Gen Core Processor Integrated Graphics Controller bus-ID: 00:02.0
           X.Org: 1.15.1 drivers: intel (unloaded: fbdev,vesa) Resolution: 1920x1080@60.0hz
           GLX Renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Haswell Desktop GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 10.1.3 Direct Rendering: Yes
Audio:     Card-1: Intel Xeon E3-1200 v3/4th Gen Core Processor HD Audio Controller driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:03.0
           Card-2: Intel Device 8ca0 driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture ver: k3.16.0-38-generic
Network:   Card: Intel Ethernet Connection (2) I218-V driver: e1000e ver: 2.3.2-k port: f080 bus-ID: 00:19.0
           IF: eth0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 7001.3GB (25.8% used) 1: id: /dev/sda model: WDC_WD10EZEX size: 1000.2GB
           2: USB id: /dev/sdb model: Elements_107C size: 4000.8GB 3: USB id: /dev/sdc model: My_Book_1230 size: 2000.4GB
Partition: ID: / size: 902G used: 5.6G (1%) fs: ext4 ID: swap-1 size: 17.05GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap
RAID:      No RAID devices detected - /proc/mdstat and md_mod kernel raid module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 29.8C mobo: 27.8C
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 187 Uptime: 14:45 Memory: 1329.2/15926.4MB Runlevel: 2 Gcc sys: 4.8.4
           Client: Shell (bash 4.3.11) inxi: 1.9.17
rocky@rocky-All-Series ~ $








This is where I'm at now. I am still playing with my system.


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#30 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 12:19 AM

Rocky, the system is looking great! :thumbup2:

 

One word of caution though, unless you were connecting it to show your total specs, it's best to keep removable drives for data/backup unconnected during use, especially if running Windows also. This is because of the various 'crypto' threats that has emerged over the last couple of years. Hopefully you'll never encounter one, yet if you were to, and your backup drive is connected, your data/backups on the drive would also be encrypted, rendering these useless. 

 

That's why I quit the practice of backup on internal drives, those backups are your quick way out of such an infection, and the only way out of some of the newer such threats. Here's one of the main Topics with more information & I'm sharing this because I've seen that you're also participating in the Windows Insider Preview program. 

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/506924/cryptolocker-hijack-program/#entry3150230

 

Keep up the great work, looks like you're picking up Linux at a very fast pace. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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