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Using public Wi Fi when traveling


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#1 VecchioScarpone

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:04 PM

Planning to do some regular traveling in the near future (retiring soon B) ).

As far as possible I shall use friends or relatives private connections but realistically speaking, I'll have to use public Wi Fi often enough, for purchasing travel tickets, banking transactions, mailing etc.

 

I shall carry a laptop with the following:

Windows firewall

Bitdefender Free AV

CryptoPrevent

SpywareBlaster

MBAE free

Zemana AntiLogger free

Cyberghost VPN free

 

Firefox browser with the following add-ons:

HTTPS Everywhere, ZenMateVPN, uBlock, Disconnect, WOT.

 

When on public network I shall use Windows On-Screen Keyboard for entering passwords and sensitive details.

 

Would the above settings be safe enough? Is anything else that I should do or don't for that matter?

 

Regards,

 

VS  :)

 

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:29 PM

I would not connect through any public Wifi unless it was through a VPN

 

http://blog.laptopmag.com/9-tips-to-stay-safe-on-public-wi-fi



#3 saw101

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:32 PM

Another good article: http://www.howtogeek.com/219384/how-to-avoid-snooping-on-hotel-wi-fi-and-other-public-networks/


I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#4 VecchioScarpone

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:35 PM

I would not connect through any public Wifi unless it was through a VPN

 

http://blog.laptopmag.com/9-tips-to-stay-safe-on-public-wi-fi

Thanks for the link provided.

A free VPN is not as safe. Well I shall have to ad a paying subscription to my travel expenses, it is surely worth.


Edited by VecchioScarpone, 14 June 2015 - 05:35 PM.


#5 VecchioScarpone

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:36 PM

Thanks mate.



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:42 PM

The link I provided is just one example. There are a number of good VPN's. Research them before you purchase.

 

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2403388,00.asp

 

https://torrentfreak.com/anonymous-vpn-service-provider-review-2015-150228/


Edited by JohnC_21, 14 June 2015 - 05:44 PM.


#7 VecchioScarpone

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 05:47 PM

Thanks again John.

I have a trial version of CyberGhost that a friend provided me. As most of my traveling will be in Europe I may stick to it.

No hurt on checking other alternatives though.


Edited by VecchioScarpone, 14 June 2015 - 06:46 PM.


#8 VecchioScarpone

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 03:18 PM

To whom it may concern:

 

I contacted ZenMate add-on support and was advised that if I really have to use public Wi Fi for banking and others sensitive transaction, better to use a VPN desktop client, not depending on a browser add-on VPN.

 

(Not that I didn't believe john and saw, just that this information from ZenMate, "the horse mouth", could be beneficial for others to know and validate their advice.)

 

VS

:)


Edited by VecchioScarpone, 18 June 2015 - 03:22 PM.


#9 annetteriley

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 11:26 PM

Just using https in public WiFi with a good antivirus software like Kaspersky and a Codomo Firewall, it's good for me.



#10 cat1092

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 01:17 AM

If running Firefox, the NoScript add-on is the best security extension of any browser. 

 

Maybe that's why it was renamed the NoScript Security Suite. I use it on all of my Firefox installs, whether at home or on the go. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 guidecca

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 05:45 PM

What if he encrypted his laptop?  Would it be safe from CryptoLocker?



#12 cat1092

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 03:02 AM

What if he encrypted his laptop?  Would it be safe from CryptoLocker?

 

Not necessarily, should a CryptoLocker infection get on the computer, it would just be double encrypted. 

 

These criminals could care less about what's on the drive in many cases, what they want is your ransom money to get your data back. While it's good for the drive to be encrypted from a security standpoint, to keep data thieves from accessing one's data, this is by no means protection from a crypto type attack. 

 

Because I've never dealt with this, I cannot say that one's data pre-encrypted would make recovery harder. 

 

What I can say is that regular images of the drive is the 100% cure to this. If one plans to travel, it's best to create a Full drive image first, there's many great Free backup apps to choose from, and backup drives are at all time lows per GB. If one can afford to travel abroad, then the same can afford a 1TB backup drive on promo at Newegg for $50-60 or a 2TB one for $$90-100. If that tight on cash, may need to rethink travel plans. 

 

These drives are also available at many Walmart stores, but expect to pay more, that 1TB backup drive for $50-60 becomes a 500GB one, unless a larger one is on promo. This is why I prefer to shop at Newegg, am always getting deals via promo codes that per the BleepingComputer rules, that I cannot post here. There's some items that I'd like to post, but have to provide an Amazon link, because the Newegg one has a promo code on the page. 

 

At any rate, we all should be imaging our drives as a maintenance item, it's not only for drive failure, also for when infection strikes. Having a recent backup means no tools are needed to remove infections, just delete all partitions on the drive, run a quick format of the drive & delete that, using a bootable partition tool like shown below. Prevention is much more efficient & less work than cure. 

 

http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html

 

Also, in the Screenshots, look at the Bootable Main Interface. Highlight the drive you wish to restore & click rebuild MBR, and from a drop down list or how it's presented, choose your OS, follow any prompts, than click 'Apply' at the top of the screen. This cleans & resets your bootloader, if lost. This is an area where Malware can hide and even after a Secure Erase (SSD) or overwrite the drive with the 'autonuke' option of DBAN (HDD Only), may still be present. This is to be used prior to recovering a backup image. Secure Erase for SSD's takes only a couple of minutes, DBAN for HDD's may take hours of overnight for large sized drives. Some may prefer to just after deleting the partitions on the drive, create a new partition for the whole drive & that formats it quick. Delete this & repeat 4-5 times & finally delete all. 

 

One last thing, if there's an option to create a Recovery Disk set, which will take at least 3 to 5 DVD's, perform this task. It'll make the OS line new again, though all of that junk has to be removed. However, if your only choice, like no backups were created, it's better than nothing. Some OS's will offer to create a Recovery Drive instead, a 16GB size one will be needed, because the Recovery Partition will be copied over to reinstall. Keep in mind that for as long as one owns this computer, do not use this Flash drive for anything else, and place it away from those that's used often for storage. Preferably, with the documents that came with your computer, or in a safe (many of us has small ones that's under $100 to keep items of importance in. 

 

Though if given the chance it's slower creating & restoring, but nothing beats DVD's for this task, about 90 minutes of time is required & one can be doing other things. When one DVD if finished, use a permanent marker to label each in order, also mark this on the sleeve it's placed in. Continue until finished. Actually it faster to restore with these versus creating the media, as every DVD is verified after creation. 

 

That's it, if (preferably) backups are regularly taken, one can get out of this jam & not lose much data. If one is too lazy to learn or too tight to purchase a backup drive, then the recovery drive or DVD set will make the OS like new again. Backups are just so much easier, and if anyone wants to learn, please create a Topic in the proper section of the forum & someone will further explain. Many of the members here are more than happy to assist one with these tasks. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 chip2001

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 03:39 PM

Just using https in public WiFi with a good antivirus software like Kaspersky and a Codomo Firewall, it's good for me.

 

i don't want my first post to start an argument but i had to comment when i saw your comment.... wow that's naive!

 

have you never hear of wireshark? you can get plugins to decrypt http traffic

have you never heard of cain and abel? that posions SSL traffic on a whole network and delivers usernames and passwords from encrypted sites without ever having to leave your seat.

 

i think you should re-think your stance on just using "https in public WiFi with a good antivirus software like Kaspersky and a Codomo Firewall"

 

chip



#14 cat1092

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 02:59 AM

One needs to be very careful when using open wi-fi hotspots, those in airports, restaurants & hotels (even the Ethernet connections of the latter), as chances are while traveling (as well as locally), one is going to cross paths with a data thief, it's just a matter if we're the target of an attack. It's best at a minimum to have a smartphone with at least 3G capabilities, so that these users aren't exposed to far less secure wireless hotspots, and make dang sure to have wireless (as in 'wi-fi') disabled totally & Bluetooth as well. MAC addresses can be spoofed & all it takes is a hacker whom knows what they're doing. And to be fair, Apple, Google's line of wireless devices & even Linux distros, are no better. Once that signal hits the airwaves it's a data gold mine for the taking.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

As far as Kaspersky & the Comodo Firewall duo goes, actually I'd feel no safer than running Windows Defender & their Firewall. Have used both brands, Kaspersky has to be among the worst IS suites I've had a license to run, on three separate computers, the HIPS component of the Firewall was unusable for like over two months less than a couple of years back. To minimize damage to their image, the forum staff done a lot of cleaning up of the posts/Topics, one started by myself, is no longer there. They were just telling members not to worry, this is an elevated issue & this is Kaspersky's top concern at the moment. If so, then why did it take longer than two months for a fix? Especially when the owner & company founder is considered among the best of 'experts' in the field. 

 

How can one place trust in the rest of the software if part of it has gone haywire? 

 

As to Comodo, which I've used but have less experience with, they're primarily into the selling of services (& giving a few away) than creating a decent product, which underlying engine may or may not be theirs. Reminds me too much of walking into a Best Buy store with all of their 'Geek Buddy' offerings, in addition to their browser based on Chromium (one of their few freebies). I'd rather see a security corporation focused on security than developing 3rd rated browsers at best, the only times that I see Comodo Dragon offered is when seeing their other products. 

 

When it comes to security, we get what we pay for, nothing less & certainly nothing more. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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