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Cortana


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#1 Artbuc

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 03:34 AM

Have searched but can not find a clear answer. Will Cortana open websites? From what I read, it will providing the website is bookmarked and pinned. Is this correct?

If the website requires login, eg eBay, will Cortana do the login for you? Since Edge will be able to save usernames and passwords, it seems possible. Eg, can I say "Hey Cortana, open eBay" and the eBay login page opens. Then can I say, "Hey Cortana, login to eBay" or will I have to click the login button?

I am asking this for my visually impaired friend. I am wondering if Win 10 with Edge and Cortana could help him. Thanks.

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#2 Aura

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 05:21 AM

Hi Artbuc :)

From what I can read, Cortana could already open websites by voice on Windows 8.1 for Phone, so I don't know why the Cortana on Windows 10 couldn't do a such thing :)

http://www.windowscentral.com/how-open-websites-voice-cortana

As for the login, you can use Cortana to login on Facebook apparently, but I don't know for the other websites.

https://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/how-to/wp8/cortana/cortanas-settings

Also, saving passwords locally in a browser is a security risk, so I wouldn't do that. I would use a password manager instead like LastPass.

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#3 Artbuc

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 05:35 AM

Thanks Aura. I tried LastPass. It did not work at all on some sites, worked partially or malfunctioned on most others. I found it very awkward and user unfriendly.

#4 Aura

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 05:38 AM

Can you list me a few websites on which LastPass doesn't work? I've been using it for a year now, on various websites (I even have the mobile app on my Nexus 5) and it works quite well. There's also other alternatives such as Roboform, 1Password, KeePass, etc. :)

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#5 Artbuc

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 05:50 AM

I forget but I believe LP malfunctioned on one of my banks and Verizon. Can you say more about the security risk of saving passwords in a browser? Will these risks be reduced with Win 10 Edge?

#6 Aura

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 06:48 AM

Passwords that are saved in a browser are saved locally on a system. Which means that a malware can easily "steal" these files and then use the password in them. Even thought you can protect them with a master password (on Mozilla Firefox for example), these files can still be stolen and compromised.

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#7 rp88

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 04:13 PM

Not only can malware steal stored passwords, this malware can do it all in milliseconds of executing. I read an article a while back on how hackers have bundled together a variety of password stealers (one for each major browser or other common storage location) into one program which can be run and produce a log of all the stored passwords almost instantly. This can apparently be run from a USB or cd/dvd if autorun is enabled, or it could be run as part of a virus coming either from: a sneakily named double extensioned file, a virus pretending to be a legitmiate program download to encourage a user to un it, or malware arriving through an exploit.

There are three choices for secure passwords, I would personally opt for a mixture of the last two:

1.pasword manager software, which stores the paswords in an encrypted from (so malware can't steal them), this usually requires a master password. This can perform like the notebook (option3) but it might be better not to use it for bank or email account passwords, it also guards against reuse.

2.in your head and no-where else, best option for the passwords than need to be really really private (bank, main email account, and such).

3.on a notebook in a locked safe, use for the really important passwords only if you are at high risk of forgetting them. All the other passwords should go here also. Noting down passwords helps you avoid password reuse because you don't struggle to remember passwords, so don't end up reusing one you remember in several places. Password reuse is extremely dangerous.

Edited by rp88, 12 June 2015 - 04:13 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#8 Aura

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 04:16 PM

Sadly, option 2 and option 3 lacks "productivity". It's suggested to never have the same password on more than one account, so remembering more than 15 or 20 passwords can become an impossible task. As for number 3, same as 2 pretty much. You would have to carry it everywhere and if you were to lose it or need a password you can't remember and don't have your notebook with you, you would be done for it.

While I agree that option 2 and 3 are the most "secure" methods, in today's reality, they are the less practical there is sadly. Anyway that's for another debate, we're going a bit off-topic :)

Edited by Aura., 12 June 2015 - 04:16 PM.

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