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Can taking hard drives in and out cause problems?


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#1 username30

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 03:17 PM

I have a toshiba laptop from 2010.

 

I asked someone to come over to back up my nearly full hard drive but after a serious of unfortunate events I didn't get what I wanted and somehow what happened is my hard drive never got backed up and a new hard drive got put in. After the person left I was very upset because I have no backup of my old hard drive. On the new hard drive there are files from my old hard drive, so the new hard drive is not empty and I don't want anything bad to happen to it. The person did a cloning of my computer but what I had wanted was all my files put on an external hard drive so I could view the files on other computers. The cloning backup was done on an external hard drive that is not mine, so I don't have my own backup on an external hard drive like I wanted.

 

So here is my question: is it okay to take out my new hard drive and put the old hard drive back in? Then I will have a backup done of the old hard drive onto my own external hard drive--is that okay? And then is it okay to take the old hard drive back out and put the new hard drive back in? Will all that in and out cause damage or problems? Will it cause any sort of file corruptions or for any files to get deleted or go away? I absolutely cannot risk anything bad happening to any of the files on my old hard drive. I am very nervous about putting hard drives in and out so many times. I don't want anything bad to happen. Is it possible for anything bad to happen when taking hard drives in and out of computers? I know hard drives crash so it makes me nervous messing with it. i do not want anything bad to happen to the new or the old hard drives.

 

The reason I am wanting my old hard drive put back in is to do a backup of it onto my own external hard drive. I do not want to do a backup of the new hard drive because I think I did something to mess it up, it is hard to explain over text.

 

Please help. Thank you :)



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#2 username30

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 04:06 PM

I posted this question on another forum and got banned for not being a computer tech. If this forum has that same rule, can you please first direct me to a forum for average people before banning me? Thank you.



#3 technonymous

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 04:30 PM

So your laptop hard drive was full and you wanted to offload those files as a backup onto another drive. During that transition the hard drive was replaced with a new one. Which is to my understanding not what you wanted. That's where I am little confused as why the HD was swapped. Was it for a larger HD or because of a failing HD? Did the person mention the hd had errors or anything? It sounds as though the data on the old HD was backed up temporarily onto his/her HD and then transfered again to the new. In the process made a mess of things. The thing you need to find out is if the files on the old hd are intact. With a failing HD it depends on extent of the damage. Some files can be recovered. If it is just moving data to a larger HD I don't mess with any of the data. I just make a complete Clone (mirror image) and move it from one drive to the other. If you still have the old HD you will need to get a external adapter like this to see if the files are there. I'ts quite a handy tool to have around and It's payed for itself 10 times over.

http://www.amazon.com/Drive-Adapter-Converter-Optical-External/dp/B002OV1VJW/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1434057845&sr=8-18&keywords=hd+to+usb+cable



#4 username30

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 04:43 PM

The hard drive was swapped for a larger hard drive. I don't think my hard drive was failing but I don't know. The only issue I ever had was the screen blinked off once or twice then came right back on, and sometimes I couldn't have more than three or so tabs open because a window would say I didn't have enough memory to load the webpage. I used my lap top for a long time while the hard drive was full.

 

 

I do still have my old hard drive. It is in a box for safe keeping. It has 285 gig used space and 1.75 gig free space.

 

So are you saying putting the old hard drive into my computer could damage the old hard drive and damage the new hard drive?

 

Can hard drives get damaged just by taking them out once?



#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 05:15 PM

Under normal conditions, if the hard drive was all that was swapped, it should be okay to re-install the old drive.  Another cure would be to be to buy an external enclosure for the old drive and using the new system, the old drive would be on the USB ports.  It is possible for the connections to become loose during multiple reconnections.  The delicate parts are on the MOBO so care is essential.



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 05:43 PM

username30 - first of all, welcome to BC !

 

It is NOT policy at BC to kick members off because they are not 'technical' - the site was designed and is operated to help members with skills and knowledge ranging from very low to expert to solve problems, and as such all are welcome, and I hope you enjoy your time here. Just be warned - it can become addictive !

 

You definitely needed a bigger hard drive than the one you had. Windows requires about 10-15% empty space on the primary drive to work properly. As you have been advised by technonymous and mjd putting your old drive into an enclosure - widely available and not expensive - and lifting the data you want to your new one via USB is definitely the safest way to go.

 

Chris Cosgrove

 

#7 technonymous

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 05:58 PM

The hard drive was swapped for a larger hard drive. I don't think my hard drive was failing but I don't know. The only issue I ever had was the screen blinked off once or twice then came right back on, and sometimes I couldn't have more than three or so tabs open because a window would say I didn't have enough memory to load the webpage. I used my lap top for a long time while the hard drive was full.

 

 

I do still have my old hard drive. It is in a box for safe keeping. It has 285 gig used space and 1.75 gig free space.

 

So are you saying putting the old hard drive into my computer could damage the old hard drive and damage the new hard drive?

 

Can hard drives get damaged just by taking them out once?

Not saying the drive is bad, just needed to clarify what exactly this indivdual has done. If the old hd's data wasn't messed with then putting back in the old hd shouldn't be a problem. However, to my understanding it sounded like the HD was replaced for a larger drive, or because of drive failure. If a complete clone was done, then all your files should be there, but you sounded unsure. In anycase you need a adapter or enclosure to access both drives at the same time to clone, move files between them, or whatever.


Edited by technonymous, 11 June 2015 - 05:59 PM.


#8 username30

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 03:29 PM

Thank you so much for the replies. I'm not sure if I will be using an external case thing or putting the hard drive directly into my computer yet. I'll talk about it with the person who will be helping me but I sure like the idea of not having to take out the new hard drive. It seems much simpler to use an external thing.

 

I would be putting the information from the old hard drive onto an external hard drive, though. Is that okay? Will that work? Can I move all the files from one external hard drive (my old hard drive) directly onto another external hard drive?



#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 08:34 PM

Yes, you can have multiple drives, in external enclosures, on USB ports.  I do recommend that a powered USB hub be used to avoid any excess current being drawn from the ports.  Most external units will come with it own external supply.



#10 technonymous

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Posted 13 June 2015 - 05:42 PM

A enclosure needs to be used to protect the HD. However, just about 99% of them 2.5" enclosures will draw power from the USB port. So you would have to really search out for one. That link I provided in post #3 is more of a technical tool than a permanent enclosure solution. However, you could use a USB hub that uses external USB power to help with power drops. Something like this...http://www.amazon.com/HDE-SuperSpeed-Individual-Switches-Included/dp/B00L5IS9KE/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1434235008&sr=8-10&keywords=wall+powered+USB+hub

 

The nice thing about this HUB is the individual switches. Less wear and tear on the ports unplugging them and the ability to power down the hd thus extending it's life.






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