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i need help installing PCBSD...it's the desktop version 10.1.1.1


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#1 maryannsubmarelime

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 02:04 AM

i "fixed" my computer. but i have partitioned my hard drive into 2 sections. i currently run windows 7 home premium on one partition and have successfully created a boot-image of PCBSD on a usb drive to install it on drive E: i've formatted to fat32 and have over 200 GBs allotted for PCBSD os but i was thinking....couldn't i install PCBSD on drive E: without booting up to drive E:? couldn't i just "burn" the iso image to drive E: using Unetbootin instead of burning the image to a usb drive? my partition manager has the capability of doing that ...i tried to boot up off the usb on to E: drive but nothing happened so i restarted my computer and went back into windows. what do i do at this point? i just don't want to screw up. my goal is to ease into an alternative operating system like pcbsd or anything else really but to completely phase windows altogether. i just can't believe that i've hassled with windows since the year 2000. i'm done with windows. please help me as i don't want to go on with windows one more day. they are nothing but extortionists with suits on. won't somebody please give me a heads up? thank you....(for listening). 



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 06:38 AM

Hi and welcome to the Linux and Unix forum.
 
The media you install from (your USB), has to be different to the media that you install to (the HDD partition). So you would boot your computer from the USB, and install the operating system to the HDD partition. In the first instance though, I would boot the computer using the USB, and run the operating system "live" before installing it, assuming that PCBSD has that capability.
 
Could you please explain what you did to create a boot-image of PCBSD on the USB?
 
Is the BIOS on your computer set to boot from USB as the first boot device?

i've formatted to fat32 and have over 200 GBs allotted for PCBSD os


I'm not familiar with PCBSD, but Linux operating systems ordinarily have to be installed to a Linux file system, for example ext4; fat32 is a Windows file system. However most Linux installers would format the partition with a Linux file system anyway, so that shouldn't be an issue.

Edited by Al1000, 09 June 2015 - 06:44 AM.


#3 Naught McNoone

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 10:40 AM

. . . i "fixed" my computer . . . partitioned my hard drive . . . 2 sections . . .  windows 7 home premium on one  . . . . boot-image of PCBSD on a usb drive . . . drive E . . . formatted  . . . fat32 . . . 200 GBs . . .  install PCBSD on drive E: without booting up to drive E:? . . . .  just "burn" the iso image to drive E:? . . . . tried to boot . . . usb on to E: . . . nothing . . . . back into windows . . . ease into an alternative operating system like pcbsd . . .  done with windows . . . .

 

maryannsubmarelime,

 

It looks like your off to a good start.

 

You've prepared a separate partition for your alternative OS already.  200GB is more than sufficient for your new OS.  

As Al1000 stated, is is not nesscesary to pre-format the space.  In some cases it is better to leave the section of the HDD you wish to use blank, and let the installation program set it up for you.

 

PCBSD is not actually a Linux operating system, but it does have many similarities.

 

OpenBSD is based on Unix, and has a different license from Linux.  Linux was created by Linus Torvalds and is similar to Minix. (Linux is owned by Linus, OpenBSD claims to be owned by no one.)

 

If you have questions that are specific to PCBSD, then I recommend you contact PC-BSD.  They are the most knowledgeable people when it comes to their system.  You can get help at the following web site:

 

https://forums.pcbsd.org/

 

As for the next step, please follow Al1000's advice, and confirm that your computer has the capability and is set to allow booting from the usb device.

 

I suggest that you plug your USB drive into the computer when it is shut off, and then enter the bios.  Your bios should find the USB device and list it as a boot option.

 

Once you have confirmed that, then follow the instructions given by PCBSD when it boots from the USB.

 

Let us know if you are successful, or not.

 

Cheers!

 

Naught McNoone



#4 maryannsubmarelime

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 12:54 PM

wait back up for a second, i found that pcbsd does not have the capability to boot as an operating system. so, now as of late, i am downloading the iso of linux lite, using a disc image burner to burn to a cd/dvd or inetbootin to a usb drive to install linux lite on the second partition of my hard drive. please keep in mind that i don't intend to stay with windows after my install of linux is stable enough to let windows go altogether.



#5 maryannsubmarelime

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 01:03 PM

i don't want to do this wrong and I am asking for guidance in installing this the right way without damaging either operating system. i want to do with linux what i have with windows and have had with windows for the last 15 years and that is a nice graphical desktop to login to, that's all. i've been subscribing to linux and novell and sun for years and i'm tired of putting this off. please help guide me away from windows because as much as they'd like to take my money at whatever the cost may be, i am not going to stop computing. period.



#6 Naught McNoone

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 01:08 PM

. . . pcbsd does not have the capability to boot as an operating system . . . 

 

Are you sure about that?  I would check with their website before you abandon them.

 

If you are looking for a Linux alternative, I suggest xUbuntu.

 

Cheers!

 

Naught.



#7 maryannsubmarelime

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 01:17 PM

at this point, i'm not sure about anything except that i am quite sure i don't want windows hassling me all the time...compromising my privacy all because they want to make a sale ugh!



#8 Al1000

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 02:48 PM

One thing we can be sure about is that we will be delighted to help to guide you away from Windows. :)

I have tried Linux Lite before, and found it to be straightforward enough.
 

using a disc image burner to burn to a cd/dvd or inetbootin to a usb drive


Sounds like you're doing the right thing there, but I recommend using Linux Lite or any other Linux distro you decide to try, in "live mode" by booting from the USB or CD/DVD, before installing it. You have to boot up most Linux distros in "live mode" in order to install them anyway. Or at least, that is the default way to install most Linux distros. "Live mode" is designed to enable you to try the operating system out before deciding to install it.

Re your question about installing Puppy, the recommended way to install Puppy is a "frugal" install, which means that the entire operating system is contained in a directory (/folder in Windows speak), rather than installed to a partition. So while you can have a partition dedicated to Puppy, which is what I do, Puppy can also be installed on a partition that already contains another operating system. The other operating system just sees Puppy as a directory (/folder if you're using Windows).

However there isn't a great deal of difference between using Puppy by booting from USB, and having a frugal installation on your HDD. Both booting from USB and a frugal installation on HDD can utilise what is known as a "Puppy save file." This means that your settings, and any software you install etc, is "saved" so that it will still be there the next time you boot your computer. Puppy save files can be saved on both Linux and Windows file systems, but Linux is recommended. I always use ext4. Puppy comes with a partitioning tool called GParted, which is what I use to partition and format hard drives.

Puppy is also a "miniature" Linux distro, and lacks many features that "full" Linux distros such as Xubuntu (as mentioned above by Naught) and Linux Lite have.

The first Linux operating system I installed was Ubuntu, then when I found out about Linux Mint I removed Ubuntu and installed Mint instead. It wasn't until some time later that I installed Puppy, although I had been using it from a CD for a while before I installed it, and have always treated it as a secondary rather than a primary operating system.

#9 NickAu

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 05:27 PM

 

using a disc image burner to burn to a cd/dvd

You do not need anything extra to burn an ISO with Windows 7 and up.

 

How to burn ISO image using Windows Burn Disk Image.
 
Notice:  This applies only to Windows 7 and Windows 8, earlier versions do not have this.
 
1.  Place a blank CD or DVD in the tray of your optical drive and close the tray.
 
2.  After you have downloaded the ISO image you want to burn right click on the Start orb, then choose Windows Explorer.
 
3.  When Explorer opens click on Downloads in the left pane.  Scroll down till you find the ISO file you want and double click on it.  Click on Burn Disk Image.
 
4.  In the image below you will see Disk burner:, this should be set to the optical drive you want to use.  Click on Verify disc after burning if you want to Windows to verity the disc image after burn.  Click on burn.
 
burndiskimage1_zpsb502b181.png
 
5.  In the image below you can see that the green progress bar, when the image is finished burning the bar will be filled.
 
burndiskimage2_zps17a9d6ff.png
 
6.  After the image has completed being burned click on Close.


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 01:53 AM

at this point, i'm not sure about anything except that i am quite sure i don't want windows hassling me all the time...compromising my privacy all because they want to make a sale ugh!

 

Well, that's one thing you won't find in this section of the forum (& I suggest you don't visit the Windows 10 section altogether), we're not trying to sell nor push any OS off on anyone. 

 

What we do, is do our best to get a feel for the user's needs, the machine configuration, if running Windows, a Speccy snapshot will do, not to worry, the information that you see, like your license key (COA) & IP address, we don't, these are filled with random values. 

 

Things like what you use the computer for, whether or not you or anyone with access plays games or runs virtual machines, has critical mission software that requires Windows to run (in which case a dual boot or VM would be needed), I believe you get the picture. Though I do suggest that if you're going to totally ditch Windows, at a minimum, create a recovery disk set, which takes 3 to 5 DVD's to build, this gives you the option of returning to Windows should things not work out, or if you want to sell the computer, w/out Windows, the value of the computer is cut hard. A Full disk image is also good, yet that Recovery Disk set is a one time option to create, all it takes is a few blank DVD's & about 90 minutes of your time. As a cautious person, I prefer not to chance anything & try to be ready for any situation. 

 

Like I & many others has done, I also suggest a dual boot configuration at least until your feel comfortable enough to say 'I'm ready to cut the cord'. Many does feel that way at first, though they'll be booting into their Windows OS some, and as time passes, less & less, which is the goal if one wants to be weaned off of Windows. Getting off of Windows 'Cold Turkey' is not best for everyone, and I speak from first hand experience. Others will confirm this. We want you to like Linux, and it be your choice of OS, on the other hand, want you to have a safety net for 'just in case' situations that arises. 

 

The more you can provide us with how you use your computer & your needs, the better recommendation we can provide. You may, as many others, find that you'll have to try two or more Linux distros before settling on one, normally when you find 'the one', you'll know it within minutes of using. The sooner you get to that point, the better. 

 

Linux OS's aren't the ones of the mid to late 90's (though they were still great OS's then), today's Linux OS's works as mainstream ones, with a modern GUI, some of the same apps as Windows (such as an optional Skype client) and for most every Windows software offered except a few, there are several Linux choices for the same. However, some choices in Linux are bad ones, one is cleaners. Linux OS's does a great job of cleaning up behind itself, so there's no need for a disk cleanup replacement. There is inbuilt security, so no need to install extra security, unless you're running a mail server and/or sharing lots of files with Windows computers. In this case, you do need to scan, but still the software is inbuilt. That's important to keep in mind, to scan shared files, including email ones. 

 

These are things that we can guide you with. :)

 

The more open you are with us as to your computer & use age of it, the more options we can provide you with.  :thumbup2:

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


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#11 shadow-warrior

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 12:53 PM

Just out of Interest re PCBSD Distro watch did a review recently http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20141208



#12 cat1092

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 02:02 AM

shadow-warrior, looks to be an interesting distro, Thanks for providing the review link. :thumbup2:

 

BSD based distros takes their security serious, as a result of this, many newer features aren't shipped with the distro. These would be great for a Linux user wanting to really learn the workings of a Linux OS that's based with security being the top priority of the OS. everything else is secondary. Chances are, anyone who graduated from the university (Berkeley) that distributes the BSD OS with a computer science degree are all but guaranteed employment. 

 

Though obviously, the learning curve is significantly more than a distro based on Ubuntu & for good reason. It's the OS Berkeley uses to teach the next wave of Linux IT professionals on. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 mremski

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 06:16 AM

BSD Unix, the grandaddy of them all, finally getting a bit more recognition.  :) 

OpenBSD:  security oriented, OpenSSH, OpenSSL, PF lots of other goodies.  Reminds one of using a Sun machine in the pre-Solaris days.  Good secure right out of the base install, works fine for a desktop, but the user has to put the effort in to get it there.

NetBSD: charter is basically run on as many platforms as possible.

FreeBSD:  charter was to be the best/fastest on commodity x86 hardware.  Makes a great desktop (I've been using since 3.3 days, up to 10.x now, without a Windows box for me).  Basis for PC-BSD (think of this as the Ubuntu of the BSD world, out of the box easy transition from Windows) and pfSense.  Lots of big iron run FreeBSD, I believe that the underpinnings of MacOS are now a modified version of FreeBSD.

DragonflyBSD:  branched off FreeBSD just before the 5.x timeframe, different thoughts on how SMP should be done.  Interesting ideas.

 

One of the best things about all the BSDs is that their origins are the same codebase, and changes are often easily ported between them.  They also share the BSD license which is better (my opinion) than the GNU license;  OpenBSD maintains strict adherence to the license.  In fact, pf (packet filter, firewalling code) came about over a licensing dispute.

 

 

Learning curves:  I'm going to disagree with cat on this a bit.  From a programming perspective, you write your source code to a set of standards/interfaces.  Nowdays this is the Posix interface.  The worst you have to do is account for compiler differences (Linux is natively gcc, FreeBSD has moved to clang) if you are using any compiler specific extensions (embedded asm).   What the user typically sees is "what shell am I in and what commands do I use";  there may be different arguments to accomplish the same thing or the output is slightly different.  An example of what I mean:

The ps command.  You want a list of the running processes from every user, on Linux, what do you do?  type in ps -ef.  On a BSD system type in ps aux.  Once you wrap your head around the little bits like that, it's not a big deal  (hint, most commands accept both arguments almost everything accepts -h or --help and theres always a man to stand by).

 

Typical "home user transitioning from Windows" is geared towards applications and look/feel.  All the *nix systems allow you to compile source code to get you exactly what you want.  Are current Linux-based distributions easier?  Yes.  Can you get the same end result on a BSD based system?  Absolutely, just a little more effort.

 

Chose your poison, they both get you off Windows.


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#14 NickAu

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 07:23 AM

 

Typical "home user transitioning from Windows" is geared towards applications and look/feel.

Its why most novices prefer Linux Mint, I hate the Whinedoz look and feel, It's why I prefer Ubuntu.

 

 

An example of what I mean:

The ps command.  You want a list of the running processes from every user, on Linux, what do you do?  type in ps -ef.  On a BSD system type in ps aux.  Once you wrap your head around the little bits like that, it's not a big deal  (hint, most commands accept both arguments almost everything accepts -h or --help and theres always a man to stand by).

I have always said get to know and love terminal, and you will disciover a whole new way of interacting with and doing things on your pc, Regardless of operating system, Even Whinedos users should look at cmd.


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#15 cat1092

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Posted 13 June 2015 - 11:47 PM

 

 

Regardless of operating system, Even Whinedos users should look at cmd.

 

Usually the only time that non-IT pros uses cmd is when there is a problem to fix. By then, it's often too late. For example, sfc /scannow doesn't 'fix' anything, it only verifies that the base Windows files are in place. Unless that's the problem to address, it's useless as a diagnostic tool for general issues. DISM that shipped with Windows 8 is an improved tool to use. 

 

sfc /scannow has only shown errors on a couple out of many computers in my experience, though it's normally the first recommended one to run. 

 

Though I agree cmd should be used more by Windows users, keeping in mind that there are many tools that can be ran other than the one mentioned above. The reason why I bring that one up, is because it's the one that's more frequently ran to diagnose issues, unfortunately it addresses the needs of a small number whom runs it. 

 

On the other hand, there's a ton of choices of backup software, that if used while the system is healthy, can return the computer back to that state (preferred method). Or at a minimum, create a recovery disk set when the computer is new & healthy. As long as the hardware is healthy, this is a sure fire way to have a 'like new' computer again. Unfortunately, though there are more no cost choices than ever & backup drives are at all time lows (promo pricing), backup rates in general are no higher than the turn of the century 15 years ago. 

 

Hence the #1 reason why these forums are getting larger & demand for answers are higher than ever. 

 

However, be it cmd or the Terminal, this is the way to get things done, this has been proven time & time again by a small percentage overall of the entire computing population of combined Linux/UNIX users.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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