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new toshiba laptop, can't instal linux


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#1 camplate

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 05:55 PM

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/wHN6jKGb2aeK3ZfXsPH8ROq

 

Very new to Linux, though I have a desktop running mint supporting my weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/personal-weather-station/dashboard?ID=KPAICKES2#history but I have no idea what it's doing, next winter I'll start messing with it again.

 

I got this new Toshiba Satellite laptop to replace my five year old Toshiba Satellite. First thing I wanted to do was load Linux as a dual boot, to try and use it full time.

Created a live USB on a 2GB memory stick, restarted, changed my boot settings to USB. Linux would start and right away the screen would lock up. Decided I needed the video driver, which meant I needed a larger USB.

 

Got out a 4GB, loaded mint again, added the video driver folder, restated and it goes right to windows. Tried again, and again, and again and the computer won't boot from the 4GB USB. Plugged the 4GB into my old laptop and it started from the USB and even had mint running.

 

Now, I have not yet gone back to my 2GB. I'm going to try that right now. Stay tuned...

 

 



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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 06:44 PM

I'm not going to be much help here but certainly you have Secureboot on a new computer.  So do some searches on this and UEFI and you will be busy for a while lol.  Someone will come along to help soon.  Or use some of my searches that I've compiled from this forum.  The first is some good advice from our member Hollowface.

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/575106/how-do-install-ubuntu-using-a-memory-card/#entry3697272

 

http://www.rodsbooks.com/efi-bootloaders/secureboot.html

 

http://www.bytelinux.com/install-linux-mint-17-1-dual-boot-windows-10-uefi-systems/

 

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI


Edited by pcpunk, 07 June 2015 - 06:45 PM.

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#3 NickAu

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 04:36 AM

 

Got out a 4GB, loaded mint again, added the video driver folder, restated and it goes right to windows. Tried again, and again, and again and the computer won't boot from the 4GB USB. Plugged the 4GB into my old laptop and it started from the USB and even had mint running.

What version of Mint is it?

 

 

but certainly you have Secureboot on a new computer

 

Pc Punk is correct about the secure boot thing.


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#4 camplate

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 08:53 PM

The video problem was an auto detect. Once I turned that off it worked okay from 2GB USB.

 

I plugged the 2GB USB in and it booted from the USB. I installed MATE 17.1 (I thought I had cinammon). I aovery discs and ry again to make it dual m not dual booting, I just overwrote everything, but I may need to reinstall from the recovery discs.

I guess the lesson is that it reconized one USB and then wouldn't reconize a second one?

 

Still need to learn a lot. The keyboard needs hard typing to work, plus things get deleted for no reason. The mouse touchpad floats too much, but I hate touch select so glad that is turned off right now.



#5 pcpunk

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 01:21 AM

Did you read any of those articles, and did you turn off Secureboot?  Your writing is making my ADD kick in lol.  

 

Sounds like you erased your widows install?, opps!

 

If you still need help were here, try to be a little more clear and do a little planning before you attempt an install.  Slow down a little and we will get you in the right direction.


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#6 cat1092

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 04:54 AM

Hello camplate &  :welcome: to the Linux section of BC Forums!

 

We're happy to have you here & willing to do what we can to assist in getting you going with Linux.  :)

 

The good thing is that you purchased a notebook before the Windows 10 release, as word has it that some OEM's may not allow consumers to disable SecureBoot, period. The option may not be there & the consumer will be stuck with running Linux OS's in virtual machines. 

 

Am very glad that you created a Recovery Media set, as the large majority doesn't do this before installing Linux. :thumbup2:

 

The issue being, is that even if one successfully creates a dual boot Windows & Linux computer, the option for Recovery, including creating Recovery Media, is often damaged by the configuration change. The program expects all partitions to be the same way it shipped. Too, while these will recovery your OS, these often won't recover to a smaller SSD, which many installs after purchase. I used to recommend to those wanting a SSD to purchase one after the notebook, since more & more are shipping with 1TiB HDD's, these are still a bit expensive, and that's why I recommend at time of purchase, pre-installed. Unless it's 500GiB or less, these SSD's are now on promo for less than $200 now & I'm speaking of good brands, such as Samsung 850 EVO. The recovery media, if shipped with a 500GiB HDD, will recover to a 500GiB SSD. 

 

Now, as to your computer's current status. What OS, if any, are you able to boot into, and have you tried installing Linux Mint again? You can always download the Cinnamon edition if that's what you want, just be sure it's the 64 bit version. 

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=172

 

I recommend using a download manager for this, not only will it be much faster, if there's a break in the network, the download will resume. Since Firefox is the installed default browser, I highly recommend installing it on your Windows install, and once setup, go to the Add-ons tab & type 'Down Them All' in the search box, and when you see it, just click the tab to install it, in a few seconds a page with a tutorial will open. It's no cost & gets all of the speed it can while downloading your Linux ISO, normally I can have this inside of 10 minutes. Seeing you're in the same time zone as myself, I recommend choosing the James Madison University site for the download. Some of the others are very slow. The JMU hosting site is Fast. 

 

There's also a place to copy/paste the MD5 in the Down Them All box, once installed, when you download anything, both regular download & Down Them All is an option. Normally, the downloaded ISO will go to your Downloads folder, unless you specify otherwise. Be sure after copy/pasting the MD5 hash, to select MD5 from the drop down list afterwards. 

 

Being that I've never installed Linux on a computer with Secure Boot enabled, I don't know how it works, some distros has the signed keys for install, others doesn't. One of the first things that I do on a Secure Boot enabled computer is disable it anyway (I have two of these models), as I prefer Windows 7 over 8 & there's no keys for 7. Oddly, Microsoft will provide the keys for Linux users but not the most used OS on the planet. Though I know it's about sales & they want users off of Windows 7. However, Secure Boot does not make you safer in the least, rather it places a set of handcuffs on you, as to what you can & cannot do with your physical property. Windows 8 will normally boot fine by disabling Secure Boot, as long as no other changes are made. 

 

So maybe that's where you need to start, by disabling Secure Boot & then try to install your Linux Mint OS. There's a chance that you may have to do this by DVD, or that's the way it is on my Samsung. And be sure, if you haven't already, to defrag your 'C' drive, the one containing Windows 7, and then you can shrink that partition in Disk Management. You get to this by typing 'Create and format disk partitions' in the Search box (w/out any quotes). Some suggests to shrink with GParted, I don't recommend this on a UEFI partition, or any Windows version that has the native ability to shrink the partition, I know that Windows 7 & above has this feature, am unsure about Vista. 

 

How about trying that & see how the install goes. If all goes OK & you can boot to both OS's, I'll leave it up to you to re-enable Secure Boot, you're really better off w/out it. Your installed security on Windows is what protects you, not a setting in the BIOS that just ties your hands behind your back. 

 

Good Luck with your Linux Mint install! :thumbup2:

 

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#7 rp88

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 12:57 PM

" Windows 8 will normally boot fine by disabling Secure Boot, as long as no other changes are made. "

I think the general rule is that windows 8 and 8.1 will always boot fine with secure boot disabled, but in some cases they will not be able to boot if the computer is in BIOS "compatibility/legacy mode" rather than the normal UEFI mode.

Edited by rp88, 11 June 2015 - 12:57 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#8 camplate

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 05:40 PM

Did you read any of those articles, and did you turn off Secureboot?  Your writing is making my ADD kick in lol.  

 

Sounds like you erased your widows install?, opps!

.

If you still need help were here, try to be a little more clear and do a little planning before you attempt an install.  Slow down a little and we will get you in the right direction.

 

It's not my typing; its the computer. My thumbs float over the touchpad and the mouse jumps, making me type in a different spot. I had to fix a lot and thought I had cleared everything up.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 11:07 PM

Some of these notebooks are very sensitive even with the stock OS installed, adding a Linux OS in the mix may make it better or worse. Though often, these issues are fixable, or can be improved be using a wireless mouse. 

 

I seen in your other post (#4) that you were using MATE rather than Cinnamon, so evidently it's not an issue of MATE versus Cinnamon. There's a setting in Control Center under Mouse (Pointer Speed) where the sensitivity can be changed, though it's best to make any adjustments in small increments. There's another that allows one to Disable touchpad while typing, which may help with the issue you describe, if it's disabled, it shouldn't be interfering with your typing, this applies only then the touchpad is used & not a mouse. 

 

Another adjustment is often needed by many, to check the box 'Enable mouse clicks with touchpad', otherwise, one has to right click on items to open. This, I fould out on my older Toshiba, that my wife is now using. Originally I asked about that issue on their hardware forum, before joining here, and the Toshiba site offers no Linux assistance, ended up just digging through the settings to resolve the issue myself. 

 

The only other thing that I can think of at the moment, is that some of these OEM's makes it harder to install a Linux OS, while some finds it easy, even across the same brand, later models may be more dependent on Windows drivers. Though over time, these issues can be nailed down, as more reports these. In the meantime, you may have to play around with the settings a bit more to get things reasonably close. 

 

BTW, are any drivers showing in the Driver Manager (under Administration) to apply? If any are video drivers & you feel that your video is fine, you can ignore any changes there. Any relating to mouse/touchpad, are what you're looking for. 

 

There may also be options in the Package Manager in regards to the Touchpad (type 'touchpad' in the Search box), though you shouldn't try any if more packages are offered to be installed w/out letting us know first. The reason being is that if you should decide to uninstall that package, the other added ones may not uninstall with it, leaving garbage you don't need left on the OS that may later cause issues. The last thing you need are more issues. 

 

Hopefully we can get this issue nailed down & fixed.  :thumbup2:

 

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#10 cat1092

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 11:29 PM

" Windows 8 will normally boot fine by disabling Secure Boot, as long as no other changes are made. "

I think the general rule is that windows 8 and 8.1 will always boot fine with secure boot disabled, but in some cases they will not be able to boot if the computer is in BIOS "compatibility/legacy mode" rather than the normal UEFI mode.

 

I know it to be fact this is very true, if one wants to keep their OEM OS running good, yet wants to disable Secure Boot, just disable that option only. Any other changes will surely leave the OS in an unbootable state, or throw it into what's known as a 'boot loop', the only way to stop it is to press F2 (or whatever key that accesses the BIOS) at one of these reboots & place the settings back the way these were. 

 

Those other options are normally only needed if these's going to be an OS change (say going from Windows 8.1 to Windows 7), or if the GPT formatting is not desired, and one wants to install in Legacy mode. Though there's a small performance advantage lost, as well as the ability to create more than 4 Primary partitions & see a drive over 3TiB is size. While one can use the drive that's over 2TiB, it has to be split, so that the MBR will see it. 

 

If the computer in question has a UEFI MB & GPT partitioned drive, it's best to leave it as such & the settings, other than to disable/enable Secure Boot, alone. There are no positives in switching to Legacy Boot, other than for temporary purposes as needed, making note of any changes made, so that these can be switched right back afterwards. 

 

Cat


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