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Stupid Question Re. Dual Boot External Storage


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#1 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 02:31 PM

Hello All,

I am running a dual boot situation with Windows 10 and Linux Mint 13.1. Within my computer, each OS is separated by resideing on its own hard drive, but externally they share a Western Digital 3 terabyte My Book. The My Book drive is simply plugged into the computer via a USB 3 jack and it holds a ton of pictures and songs and PDF documents. The format of the My Book hard drive is the NTFS format.  I have been accessing the files from both the Linux hard drive and the Windows hard drive, but when I do any major downloading it is usually using Windows. My question is since Linux uses a different file system than Windows, am I doing any harm to my system by sharing a storage that is formatted in NTFS, and will this harm my files? I am real new to this stuff and I don't want to permanently mess up the files that I have stored on my external hard drive.

 

Thank you


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#2 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 03:05 PM

There is nothing wrong with this, in fact it's quite common for dual-booters to have an NTFS data parititon so they can access files from Windows or Linux.



#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 03:18 PM

Thank you. Then I guess it will do no harm to the files themselfs. I appreciate your input.


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#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 03:37 PM


Then I guess it will do no harm to the files themselfs

 

It won't harm your files.



#5 NickAu

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 04:01 PM

 

There is nothing wrong with this, in fact it's quite common for dual-booters to have an NTFS data parititon so they can access files from Windows or Linux.

I do the same and I do not even use Winedos



#6 Naught McNoone

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 12:50 PM

. . . nothing wrong . . . common for dual-booters . . . NTFS data parititon . . . access files from Windows or Linux.

 

Rocky,

 

20 years ago I would have said "STOP!"  Today I say, "Damn the technology, full speed ahead!"  :)

 

NTFS (New Technology File System) was Microsoft's journalling answer for WindowsNT.  Because MS and IBM had a falling out over the development and direction of OS2, MS created their own file system, leaving HPFS to Big Blue. (High Performance File System, IBM's answer to the journalling file system.)

 

Because of it's design, and because Linux could not use any proprietary code belonging to MS, it became a very dicey thing to access an NTFS partition from Linux.  Most Linux gurus warned against trying to mount an NTFS partition in anything other than read only mode.

 

Eventually the nut was cracked.  Linux kernel 2.2.0 and later have the ability to safely read NTFS partitions, 2.6.0 and later supports file read, write and resize.

 

NT lives on in it's descendants, WinXP, Vista, Win7, etc.  And so does the file system.  Although it has undergone several changes over the years.  (Windows versions are backwards compatible for reading NTFS, but don't try to access a new NTFS partition with WindowsNT 3.5!)

 

Nowadays you have the option to install a 3rd party driver that allows your Windows system to see the ext file systems used by Linux as a default.  But you may run into the reverse of the earlier attempts to access NTFS by Linux!

 

The best option seems to be to let Windows manage it's own file system, blindly believing it is the only OS in the universe, and just mount your NTFS storage drive in Linux.

 

Cheers!

 

Naught.

 

(Sorry if it sounds like a lecture, but . . . I did go back to one of my old lesson plans to refresh my memory!)  :tophat:



#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 02:57 PM

Thank you very much for the lesson and the background info Naught.


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#8 DeimosChaos

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 10:31 AM

Or forget the external hard drive! Throw up a Ubuntu server running a RAID and a samba server. Then you can access your info from all devices on your network! Then to make it more fun put up a Plex server to enjoy your videos, music, and pictures from anywhere in the world!

 

That is the great thing about Linux, it can pretty much access any type of storage device regardless of the formatting config it has. That's why its used to recover data off bad hard drives.


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