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[Application Recommendation] Terminal emulators that have paste protection?


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#1 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 02:50 PM

I was playing around on Elementary OS 0.3 (X86-64), when I discovered that the pre-installed terminal-emulator, titled Terminal, includes a cool feature to protect users when pasting commands that start with sudo. A prompt appears to make sure you want to run the command. I've never seen a feature like this before, and am wondering if there are other terminal emulators, for Linux in general, with this feature, though preferably accompanied by an option to turn the prompt on/off? Just asking this out of curiosity.



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#2 shadow-warrior

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 07:00 PM

https://launchpad.net/pantheon-terminal   if you want to download it for another machine 



#3 cat1092

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 01:49 AM

On the surface, this may sound to be a good idea, yet still one has to give their password to execute the command, so it seems more like extra work than anything. 

 

Most aren't, yet a few sudo commands are very long & copy/paste is the best way to ensure that the command is accurate. One wrong entry or not a space where it's supposed to be, and the command is no good. Though I suppose one could physically type sudo & copy/paste the rest. 

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 02:03 AM


On the surface, this may sound to be a good idea, yet still one has to give their password to execute the command, so it seems more like extra work than anything.

 

It is redundant, and kind of pointless, but I find it interesting.



#5 cat1092

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 03:02 AM

Yes, it is interesting, lets just hope that it doesn't become an industry trend for Linux. :)

 

I have to say, as over a 6 year Linux user overall (6 years of Linux Mint after being bounced from one distro to another for 3-4 months), Linux has greatly improved to the point that if push came to shove, over 90% of Windows home/student users could adapt with little issues. Other than the little used IE (market share is shrinking), if one can boot their computer, that same person can use a Linux OS for typical home use, including browsing, sending & receiving emails, watching YouTube & other videos (there's a substitute for Silverlight if needed), and a fully functional Office suite in LibreOffice. 

 

I'd much rather deal with the issue that the OP brings up over running an insecure OS for the rest of my life. Really, all that I need Windows for is assisting others, it's not my daily ride. Have never tried Elementary, yet have noticed it's high up the ladder in the DistroWatch rankings, at spot #7. While not everyone goes by this ranking site, no one else has taken on the job that I'm aware of. 

 

http://distrowatch.com/index.php?dataspan=26

 

So Elementary must be a really good OS to be in that spot. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 07 June 2015 - 02:49 PM


Elementary, yet have noticed it's high up the ladder in the DistroWatch rankings, at spot #7. While not everyone goes by this ranking site, no one else has taken on the job that I'm aware of. 

 

http://distrowatch.com/index.php?dataspan=26

 

So Elementary must be a really good OS to be in that spot.

 

Lubuntu is 15 :(



#7 mremski

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 07:20 AM

about sudo and passwords:  there is often a "time period" that a password will be good for.  It may be a configuration option, but typically you'd enter a sudo command, enter your password.  Any subsequent sudo commands entered within the time window (15-30 minutes) won't need the password.

 

Distribution ranking is often like "what's the hot shoe of the week",  not always based on usefulness.  Once someone realizes "Hey, I can compile anything I want" original distribution means very little.  It's a kernel, whatever version suits your fancy, GNU libraries and utilities then toss in your applications on top.  You want a different window manager than provided?  Go grab the source and build it.  That's the way it used to be.  How many remember having to bootstrap GCC on a machine?


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#8 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 02:13 PM


Distribution ranking is often like "what's the hot shoe of the week"

 

I'd still like to see Lubuntu at the top of that list. :(

 


Any subsequent sudo commands entered within the time window (15-30 minutes) won't need the password

 

True, and I'm assuming the paste protection prompt is tied to that 15 minute time-frame, because it doesn't ask everytime. I should set the time to 0 and see if the paste protection prompts everytime too.



#9 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 06:03 PM

ucDxbGv.png

 

I'm assuming the paste protection prompt is tied to that 15 minute time-frame, because it doesn't ask everytime. I should set the time to 0 and see if the paste protection prompts everytime

 

Well I tried it, I set Sudo to prompt for a password everytime it's used (as described here), and nope, paste protection isn't tied to that timeout. It appears the paste protection only happens the first time you use Sudo. You won't be prompted by paste protection again unless you close the terminal, and re-open it. That's too bad.


Edited by hollowface, 08 June 2015 - 06:05 PM.


#10 cat1092

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 10:29 PM

 

 

I'd still like to see Lubuntu at the top of that list.  :(

 

You may see it climb higher, as those with XP computers has fewer choices. Lubuntu is seen a a decent replacement for that OS & hardware requirements are modest (Pentium 4 & M CPU's, as well as AMD K8 or higher). I need to test this on my nearly 12 year old IBM T42 with Pentium 740 M & ATI Radeon 7500 GPU & see if/how it runs. 

 

EDIT: Downloading now! :thumbup2:

 

Compared to Ubuntu, much lighter. As far as getting to the top of that list, it's going to be hard getting in the top two spots, unless both Mint & Ubuntu falls flat on their faces, I don't expect either distro to do this, yet who knows what could happen? 

 

The sudo copy/paste security is a start, and you may see it tighten up over the course of a few releases, if that's what you're looking for. 

 

 

 

Distribution ranking is often like "what's the hot shoe of the week",  not always based on usefulness.

 

mremski, you have a valid point & we've seen distros rise & fall back in a short period of time. While I've not paid attention to a given distro, have seen this brought up in Topics, a new release (the 'hot shoe'), followed by a fast rise on DistroWatch, then gradually dropping back close to the same spot. It's also true that the ranking isn't based on the usefulness of a distro, rather downloads of one. If based on usefulness of distros, there's no telling how the rankings would look, though it certainly would be different. 

 

While their ratings are not perfect, no other group has stood up & competed with DistroWatch, or at least on a long term basis, while at the same time, there are two or more ranking all OS's (in a bundle). Unfortunately that's not perfect either, as Microsoft knows the approximate time this takes place & will have all retailers (possibly via 3rd party) have all computers on the sales floors connected to the Internet with screen saver locked (keeping Windows above the 90% mark). Most of the rest of the time, the retailers are looking to conserve energy & will have these shut down or sleeping so that the sales force can show the computers upon request. 

 

I'll say though, that I've never chose a distro based on rankings of any site or article, rather recommendations from other Linux users. 

 

I believe that this security feature of Elementary may prove to be useful, and it may be some day that other distros will pick up on the idea, especially should Linux rise higher in the rankings. Anything designed for improved security on Linux OS's should be seen as progress, whether or not we agree with it today, there may come a time when more security is needed & this is as good of an idea as any. We have to start somewhere. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 June 2015 - 10:46 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 13 June 2015 - 12:03 AM

You may see it climb higher, as those with XP computers has fewer choices. Lubuntu is seen a a decent replacement for that OS & hardware requirements are modest


Yes, it is a popular choice for XP to Linux converts. If I were to replace Windows XP (not planning to) on my old Dell laptop, Lubuntu would definitely be one of the distros I'd consider.

Compared to Ubuntu, much lighter.


The smaller ISO size is nice too.

As far as getting to the top of that list, it's going to be hard getting in the top two spots, unless both Mint & Ubuntu falls flat on their faces


I don't see Lubuntu ever surpassing those 2 in popularity, LXDE just isn't popular enough.




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