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ATX Power Supply


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#1 biferibiferi

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 06:13 PM

I know how to Buy an ATX Power Supply and what to look for.

 

But am I right you sould not go below 400 Watts?



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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 06:26 PM

Post your system specs so the guys can help with your decision.


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#3 biferibiferi

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 07:46 PM

My pc is ok I am going to get a new Power Supply so when I do switch out my MotherBoard some Day soon my Power Supply I can keep.

 

The one I have now is only good for 2 SATA hard drives a Card Reader CD ROM drive.?



#4 OldPhil

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 10:06 AM

A mother board "only" change will not require additional power, Bu is is always good to have a little extra  for possible upgrades, many video card for instance require 450.  Many times this is the bare minimum, IMO it is good to have about 25% in reserve so as not to tax the unit. 


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#5 hamluis

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 10:24 AM

FWIW:  The motherboard is NOT the determining factor, at any time, in determining which PSU one should purchase...rather, all the other components would be more important, IMO.

 

As for PSU calculatorss...I find them arbitrary and dedicated to ensuring that the user has more PSU-power than he/she needs.

 

One thing to bear in mind is that...virtually every OEM (HP, Dell, Lenovo, et alia) desktop...comes with a 250-watt or 300-watt PSU.  For those of us who build/assemble our own systems...we would never think of buy such a PSU...but it seems to do the job in those OEM desktops.

 

So...there is no pat answer to your question.

 

My approach is simple...I see no reason to consider/buy any PSU under 500-watts...just based on price and availability.  OTOH...I see no reason to buy a 700-watt PSU when every system that I have assembled over the last 5-10 years...has worked fine with PSUs ranging from 450-600 watts.  I don't install a physical video card, I normally have anywhere from 2-5 hard drives connected, 1 optical drive.  If I ever buy a PSU capable of more than 600 watts...it won't be because I feel that I need one, it will simply be a matter of economics driving the price lower and I feel like there is no reason not to purchase said PSU.

 

Like so many things...everyone will have a different opinion and rationales for having such...but if one looks at the reality of what OEMs do and what self-builders do...there is a wide divergence of opinion over what is considered "adequate" or "good".

 

Louis



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 11:24 AM

 

One thing to bear in mind is that...virtually every OEM (HP, Dell, Lenovo, et alia) desktop...comes with a 250-watt or 300-watt PSU.  For those of us who build/assemble our own systems...we would never think of buy such a PSU...but it seems to do the job in those OEM desktops.

 

 

A lot of those OEM systems that do use 250/300w PSU's are relatively low spec systems.  The more powerful ones come with more powerful PSU's to suit, e.g. Dell XPS 8700 SE, uses a 460w PSU, which is adequate for the parts it's supplied with.  I'm not saying there isn't a tendency for self builders to over-specify on power supplies, because there is, but that is not really a bad thing.


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