Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How to Set up Virtual Box to run Linux and Win 7


  • Please log in to reply
111 replies to this topic

#1 Achaemenid

Achaemenid

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 31 May 2015 - 04:01 PM

I want to learn linux, but I have win 7 and I need to access the internet and my linux instruction files in order to learn the Linux commands. 

 

This means I must have both OS's installed and running at the same time, so I can read the instructions on the Win 7 OS then practice them on the Linux distro. 

 

I have heard this is possible with a "virtual box." 

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Linux

 

Is this the same as dual boot?   Is there tutorial available for how to do this?

 

Suggestions appreciated



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,933 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:56 PM

Posted 31 May 2015 - 04:26 PM

Yes you can run Linux in Virtual machine.

 

What are your PC specs?

What Distro are you looking at?

Have you tried a Live Disk?

 

 

Is this the same as dual boot?

No, Dual booting is when you install Linux along side Windows and then select what operating system you boot, You can only run 1 operating system at a time with dual boot.

 

With Virtual machine you can run both operating systems at the same time.

 


Arch Linux .
 
 Come join the fun, chat to Bleeping computer members and staff in real time on Discord.
 
The BleepingComputer Official Discord Chat Server!


#3 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 31 May 2015 - 05:35 PM

Yes you can run Linux in Virtual machine.
 
What are your PC specs?
What Distro are you looking at?
Have you tried a Live Disk?
 
[quote]

Here are the specs:
 
http://speccy.piriform.com/results/L8dxJCE1pqf8QlgE2mTvubM

Ideally I was looking at TAILS distro based on Debian.

Yes, I have tried a live disk.
but to my knowledge I cannot also run Windows when I have the live disk running.


Edited by Achaemenid, 31 May 2015 - 05:36 PM.


#4 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,933 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:56 PM

Posted 01 June 2015 - 12:42 AM

Nice PC, You will have no trouble running Linux in VM.

 

Please read this, It should tell you everything you need to know.

Beginner: How To Create a Virtual Machine in Windows 7 ...

 

How To Run Ubuntu in Windows 7 with VMware Player

 

Before doing anything I suggest you 1. Defragment your HDD ( Use the default Windows 7 defrag tool ) and 2. Create backups of your Windows system.

 

 

Yes, I have tried a live disk.
but to my knowledge I cannot also run Windows when I have the live disk running.

Once you install Virtual Machine you can run live disks in VM.

 

 

Feel free to ask if you need help.


Arch Linux .
 
 Come join the fun, chat to Bleeping computer members and staff in real time on Discord.
 
The BleepingComputer Official Discord Chat Server!


#5 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,666 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 01 June 2015 - 12:59 AM

I want to learn linux, but I have win 7 and I need to access the internet and my linux instruction files in order to learn the Linux commands. 

 

This means I must have both OS's installed and running at the same time, so I can read the instructions on the Win 7 OS then practice them on the Linux distro. 

 

Suggestions appreciated

So you can use a virtual machine as you can see, and Nick has looked at your specs so your pc is perfectly capable of doing so.  

 

You can also run the LiveDVD if you like.  Then you can access those files on your W7 install from the LiveDVD, or, you can load them to a USB and read them from there.  You can also go online with the LiveDVD so as to look stuff up to learn commands and such for linux and save them to usb, or your W7 install.  The only issue here will be that you can't save anything to the linux OS, but you could save to a usb, if that is sufficient.

 

You might clarify what form your linux instruction files are in, Word, internet links etc.  I have avoided Virtual Machines but need to learn, I used once but to much to learn right now.  That would be a good way to learn though.  Don't worry to much about learning commands though as most of the operating systems are quite easy to learn.  I try not to use commands as much as possible LOL.  For most things there is a graphical option and the terminal is not needed.

 

Hope that helps.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#6 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 01 June 2015 - 03:18 AM

Nice PC, You will have no trouble running Linux in VM.
 
Before doing anything I suggest you 1. Defragment your HDD ( Use the default Windows 7 defrag tool ) and 2. Create backups of your Windows system.
 

Once you install Virtual Machine you can run live disks in VM.
 
 
Feel free to ask if you need help.


I will be completely replacing my HDD before doing this operation.


#7 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 02 June 2015 - 02:09 PM

I want to learn linux, but I have win 7 and I need to access the internet and my linux instruction files in order to learn the Linux commands. 
 
This means I must have both OS's installed and running at the same time, so I can read the instructions on the Win 7 OS then practice them on the Linux distro. 
 
Suggestions appreciated

So you can use a virtual machine as you can see, and Nick has looked at your specs so your pc is perfectly capable of doing so.  
 
You can also run the LiveDVD if you like.  Then you can access those files on your W7 install from the LiveDVD, or, you can load them to a USB and read them from there.  You can also go online with the LiveDVD so as to look stuff up to learn commands and such for linux and save them to usb, or your W7 install.  The only issue here will be that you can't save anything to the linux OS, but you could save to a usb, if that is sufficient.
 
You might clarify what form your linux instruction files are in, Word, internet links etc.  I have avoided Virtual Machines but need to learn, I used once but to much to learn right now.  That would be a good way to learn though.  Don't worry to much about learning commands though as most of the operating systems are quite easy to learn.  I try not to use commands as much as possible LOL.  For most things there is a graphical option and the terminal is not needed.
 
Hope that helps.


I was unable to use the TAIL OS (based on Debian) through the graphical interface, I booted from CD last time I tried. So I cannot access the internet site with Linux instruction. That is why I need to keep Windows open while I am learning.

I have found mainly command line instructions for linux so far and very little about the graphical user interface.

Edited by Achaemenid, 02 June 2015 - 02:09 PM.


#8 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 02 June 2015 - 02:28 PM

 

 

I want to learn linux, but I have win 7 and I need to access the internet and my linux instruction files in order to learn the Linux commands. 
 
This means I must have both OS's installed and running at the same time, so I can read the instructions on the Win 7 OS then practice them on the Linux distro. 
 
Suggestions appreciated

So you can use a virtual machine as you can see, and Nick has looked at your specs so your pc is perfectly capable of doing so.  
 
You can also run the LiveDVD if you like.  Then you can access those files on your W7 install from the LiveDVD, or, you can load them to a USB and read them from there.  You can also go online with the LiveDVD so as to look stuff up to learn commands and such for linux and save them to usb, or your W7 install.  The only issue here will be that you can't save anything to the linux OS, but you could save to a usb, if that is sufficient.
 
You might clarify what form your linux instruction files are in, Word, internet links etc.  I have avoided Virtual Machines but need to learn, I used once but to much to learn right now.  That would be a good way to learn though.  Don't worry to much about learning commands though as most of the operating systems are quite easy to learn.  I try not to use commands as much as possible LOL.  For most things there is a graphical option and the terminal is not needed.
 
Hope that helps.

 


I was unable to use the TAIL OS (based on Debian) through the graphical interface, I booted from CD last time I tried. So I cannot access the internet site with Linux instruction. That is why I need to keep Windows open while I am learning.

I have found mainly command line instructions for linux so far and very little about the graphical user interface.

 

 

Anything worth doing is built around the command line in Linux. The GUI is for the basic setting manipulation/internet browsing/etc. The command line is something that you should get to know if you use Linux. Of course you can get away without really using it much, but it is more fun if you use it.

 

If you want to start out using Linux, don't use TAILS. It is a slightly more advanced Linux distro in that it is configured for anonymous web surfing. It does require a little more know how. I would suggest starting out with either Ubuntu or Mint. These are the top Two (with Mint being #1) Linux distros out there. They have lots of help guides and a huge user base.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#9 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,489 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:01:56 PM

Posted 02 June 2015 - 03:16 PM

Of course you can get away without really using it much, but it is more fun if you use it.


Isn't it just. I always did and still do consider Windows' command line to be something to stay clear of, whereas the exact opposite is true with Linux.
 

I would suggest starting out with either Ubuntu or Mint.


Me too. Or any of the official Ubuntu derivatives; Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu or Ubuntu-MATE.

#10 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 02 June 2015 - 03:23 PM

 

Of course you can get away without really using it much, but it is more fun if you use it.


Isn't it just. I always did and still do consider Windows' command line to be something to stay clear of, whereas the exact opposite is true with Linux.
 

I would suggest starting out with either Ubuntu or Mint.


Me too. Or any of the official Ubuntu derivatives; Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu or Ubuntu-MATE.

 

 

It is for sure! I use it on a daily basis for work, and my command line skills have improved quite a bit. I was comfortable using the command line in my personal use, and did like using it, but since having to use it at work I have become pretty good at using it. Along with scripting in various languages.

 

Anyway, definitely give any one of the distros suggested here and throw it in a VirtualBox VM. Super fun to play around with in there, and you get the added bonus of using your Windows machine as well without rebooting.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#11 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 07 June 2015 - 05:05 PM

Nice PC, You will have no trouble running Linux in VM.

 

Please read this, It should tell you everything you need to know.

Beginner: How To Create a Virtual Machine in Windows 7 ...

 

How To Run Ubuntu in Windows 7 with VMware Player

 

Before doing anything I suggest you 1. Defragment your HDD ( Use the default Windows 7 defrag tool ) and 2. Create backups of your Windows system.

 

 

Yes, I have tried a live disk.
but to my knowledge I cannot also run Windows when I have the live disk running.

Once you install Virtual Machine you can run live disks in VM.

 

 

Feel free to ask if you need help.

Nick Au:

 

Thanks for this link. 

 

In the instructions, it says I have to say how much space I want the virtual partition to be.  

 

How much should I give it, if it TAILS OS?



#12 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,933 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:56 PM

Posted 07 June 2015 - 06:03 PM

 

How much should I give it, if it TAILS OS?

I have never installed it in VM so I have no idea, I would think 10 GiB is more than enough.


Arch Linux .
 
 Come join the fun, chat to Bleeping computer members and staff in real time on Discord.
 
The BleepingComputer Official Discord Chat Server!


#13 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 09 June 2015 - 02:41 AM

 

 

How much should I give it, if it TAILS OS?

I have never installed it in VM so I have no idea, I would think 10 GiB is more than enough.

 

Yes, as I recall OS's take up relatively little space. 



#14 Achaemenid

Achaemenid
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 419 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:56 PM

Posted 11 June 2015 - 02:38 AM

What would be the best option for just using the VM to operate 2 OS's simultaneously?

 

Microsoft gives three options. 

 

Is there a reason I should use advanced options?  Or can I just use expanding virtual disk?

 

 

"You can select between a dynamically expanding virtual hard disk (it will grow according to your virtual machine space requirements), use an existing virtual hard disk or use advanced options."

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/56158/beginner-how-to-create-a-virtual-machine-in-windows-7-using-virtual-pc/



#15 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,933 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:56 PM

Posted 11 June 2015 - 02:54 AM

 

In the advanced options window, you can select to create a dynamically expanding hard disk (the hard drive will grow as your virtual machine needs), a fixed sized hard drive (you assign the amount of storage for it) and a differencing hard drive (the changes will be stored in a different hard drive so the original hard drive can be intact)

http://www.howtogeek.com/56158/beginner-how-to-create-a-virtual-machine-in-windows-7-using-virtual-pc/

 

I use the fixed size option.  For Linux Mint you need 15 GiB. I cant see the point of dynamically expanding VM drive unless you plan to install a lot of software and music.


Edited by NickAu, 11 June 2015 - 02:54 AM.

Arch Linux .
 
 Come join the fun, chat to Bleeping computer members and staff in real time on Discord.
 
The BleepingComputer Official Discord Chat Server!





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users