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Split ISP Into Switch


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#1 corexdev

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:27 AM

i have this scenario and was just going to give it a try i know most ISP hand out two Public IP's Most of the time, this configuration should be viable should it not ..     thanks all 

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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:48 AM

Nope won't work with that ip addressing.  Most ISP's don't hand out two wan ips.  But no matter, solution is simple.  You configure the netgear and buffalo as AP's by not using their wan ports.

 

http://www.techsupportforum.com/3001-connecting-additional-routers/



#3 corexdev

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 11:02 AM

well the Second ISP Public IP  would be something different. :I've had ISP hand me 3 Public IP's Before" so if i didn't setup that network as such 

then i would have to Statically route to the internet on both unit's , the Buffalo WAP will be static for sure because IP addresses of any Computer Switched over will be obtaining from the DHCP server , i guess my only solution "simplest" for me is to switch everything at once, using the Bufflao as DHCP until the AD / DHCP servers get setup.   then log them in onto the AD 



#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:11 PM

I sure wouldn't plan my internet access based on the good will/lack of ip control of the isp.

 

so why aren't you going isp<>netgear router<>switch<>old and new networks?  You can throw the buffalo in as an AP for both.



#5 corexdev

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:50 PM

well, o.k  sure, ill make the Buffalo and netgear  static  and run as an AP,  then ill switch everything over to my Domain Controller and have everyone reboot there PC and scream at me cause they have no email / Internet for 4 Hours    Plan is " i want to unplug OLD Ethernet cable and plug in the New CAT6 for the server at every station.  as i do them and get them Joined to the Domain.  "know-one can be down"   so how should i do that > ??    suggestions 



#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 04:05 PM

your diagram shows a old network but no server. I would read that as your email is hosted on the internet.  Changing lan ip addressing via dhcp doesn't effect that.  So I am not seeing what your issue may be. Perhaps more info concerning your migration plan is in order.  You document your plan?

 

Your old network and new network can exist in the same ip subnet and same wiring diagram. No unplug/plugging required.


Edited by Wand3r3r, 27 May 2015 - 04:53 PM.


#7 CaveDweller2

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 05:49 PM

*scratches head* What is it you want to do in the end?

 

 

Perhaps more info concerning your migration plan is in order.  You document your plan?

Yes please.


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#8 corexdev

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 08:11 PM

After reviewing and thinking about this , i've redrawn an outline of plan of attack the red broken line is were im patching in the New Network with the X , im certain this will work ,  once all clients are Logged into new network, i start tearing down Old hardware  and remove the Router.  :)

 

 

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#9 Wand3r3r

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:26 PM

Kind of a shame you didn't run this by us earlier.  Could have been so much simpler/easier. Looks like you got hung up on ip addressing and cabling.

 

1. you only need one subnet for the migration and you would have used the existing one.

2. you would have disabled the dhcp server on the router and would have made the server dhcp scope active.  No one would have noticed the change.

3. unclear why the cable swap since it appears you are using the same workstations.

4. the firewall should then replace the router or if wanting double nat it would be in front of the router not behind it. We do a sonicwall and then a cisco pix for our financial site.

5. your firewall would also be your vpn access point [again sonicwall but there are many others].  Clients use the vpn client software to connect/authenticate to then connect via RDP to a RDP server.

6. you would never have your storage and vpn server together. VPN access is your outer ring, storage is in the inner ring  You can skip the RDP server but its faster for client access [thin packets instead of fat ones] plus it gives you another layer of authentication to AD unless your vpn access is a radius server which uses AD

7. you have no fault tolerance in AD or DNS.  Microsoft recommends two servers running both for fault tolerance [can be virtuals but not on the same hardware or again you have no fault tolerance.

 

You list static for the old servers but not for the new ones.  All servers should have static ips.  You don't mention dns forwarders, which is how your AD clients will resolve internet addresses.

 

Lots of things to consider when migrating



#10 corexdev

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 05:50 AM

yes,  thank you for your  input-feedback,   Vpn server is RADIUS will Auth through AD. Mis-Labled the VPN as storage "isn't really the case" but at any rate, it's really the First larger migration i've done at this scale.  the cable swap was because of exsisting cable was not really the Correct cable Rated for Gigabit Ethernet. putting in all new Gigabit  Ethernet NICS in workstations,"replacing some workstations with new ones"  you have to understand as well the Current age of the servers and Most-Clients and network hardware and cabling is almost 20 yr's old. the owner of the Company "barely knows how to turn on a computer" seems to think.  eh it's working good  "don't upgrade"  there are 3 stations running Windows 95 & Windows 98.for gods sake.Including the Quickbooks Computers 2 of those "Windows 98"    ." yeah i know".. uggg   "walked into a Rats Nest. but it's been fun.. 


Edited by corexdev, 28 May 2015 - 06:03 AM.


#11 Wand3r3r

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 12:09 PM

Been there and its not fun. It is always amazing to hear "windows 95" and "no down time" in the same sentence: Oxymoron.  Best of luck!






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