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From the Navy to the world of IT


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#1 raszion23

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 09:15 AM

I am currently in the Navy, going on 8 yrs. I never planned on being in the Navy for this long. It was supposed to be a stepping stone and then I would move on to what I want a career in. Well, I finally came to a conclusion. I want to be an IT, more specifically, a network administrator. But sadly I do not have any IT knowledge of the sort. I am currently working on my BS of course. I have been looking at jobs online to see what they will require just to get an idea of the road ahead. Pretty sure all of then required work experience, atleast a BS in CS or IT, and plenty of certs that I only just discovered today. I was wondering, with the military background, will that help in place of the work experience or do I have to be in an IT related field of work? Also how difficult is it to achieve the certs such as CompTIA certifications, CCENT, CCNA R&S, and CCNP? Last but not least is there any advice that ya'll can provide for a noob coming into this field of choice? Thank you very much in advance.



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 03:45 PM

When I was in the military it was very easy to change your occupation code. Has that changed?


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#3 raszion23

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 08:45 AM

Well I been in for 8 yrs and it will be hard to transfer to another job. You can do it but it will be hard to

#4 Kilroy

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 09:33 AM

I'll give you the sad truth, the civilian world doesn't care about your military experience and discounts it entirely when it comes to job qualifications, at least that has been my experience.  I had four years in the Army as a 24T, PATRIOT Missile System Operator/Maintainer.  One year of Advance Individual Training (AIT) including basic electronics.

 

Your degree and certifications will get you where you want to go.  What aspect of network administration are you interested in?  I'd suggest starting off with CompTIA's Network+.  It will give you a foundation for whatever direction you decide to go.



#5 TheSteeZ

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 07:59 AM

I disagree with the post above. It really depends on the employer. It might be a good idea to try to get an internship as well. If you find an open-minded company (or manager who is prior military) you may have that direct bond.

 

You are dealing with people here, don't forget that. Nothing is black and white.

 

I like to use this example:

 

You call customer service about any  issue. The person who answers is completely useless. Does not care, does not want to listen, says the issue is not our problem. What do you do?

You call back again and get another person in the pool and have opposite results.

 

If you are motivated you will prevail, it will be tough with no experience but people do care. A lot of companies hire on personality and the eager and willingness to learn especially if you have 8 years of leadership experience. If you get past the initial filter of a resume and have a chance to state your case the odds are in your favor.

 

-Steve



#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:45 AM

The military really has changed a lot since I've been in. When I was in the Army, as long as you had served two years it was real easy to change your occupation specility. It was especially easy after you had served six years, so you would be a prime candidate to change to an IT occupation. Talk to your Officer In Charge, it might be easier than you think.


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#7 TheSteeZ

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:52 AM

@Rocky,

 

It seems that is his thinking about getting out of the military. If he goes through the process of changing his job, normally you would have to obligate X amount of service to the end of your contract (because they are sending you to school again) Also it probably wouldn't be a direct transfer of the same pay-grade. He probably would be starting back as an E-4 (not knowing his rank) That being said, he would be starting over with a pay cut and at 8 years of current service, mine as well stay for 20.

 

 

 

-Steve



#8 raszion23

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:10 AM

The military really has changed a lot since I've been in. When I was in the Army, as long as you had served two years it was real easy to change your occupation specility. It was especially easy after you had served six years, so you would be a prime candidate to change to an IT occupation. Talk to your Officer In Charge, it might be easier than you think.

 

Well in the Navy, it is not that easy to do so especially as an e-6. I had spent an equivalent of 1 year and 2-3 months in training (not boot camp) to become a meteorologist.  Plus I don't want to stay in anyways so it wouldnt make any difference me anyways on changing occupations.

 

 

@Rocky,

 

It seems that is his thinking about getting out of the military. If he goes through the process of changing his job, normally you would have to obligate X amount of service to the end of your contract (because they are sending you to school again) Also it probably wouldn't be a direct transfer of the same pay-grade. He probably would be starting back as an E-4 (not knowing his rank) That being said, he would be starting over with a pay cut and at 8 years of current service, mine as well stay for 20.

 

 

 

-Steve

 

Well you are obligated to serve x amount of years in the job field, but if someone do change jobs they would not lose rank. It would happen only if you change branches completely. It can go up a rank or go down, depending on the job and branch. But you are right though, I am planning on getting out all together.



#9 Kilroy

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 05:21 PM

TheSteeZ are you ex-military?  I got out in 1989.  I went straight into a government job because of connections I made while I was in.  I left Germany to come back to the states in 1991.  Since that time I have been employed in a number of jobs and while my military service being listed on my resume may have helped me get an interview it had absolutely no bearing on getting hired.  Unless your military experience is directly related to the work you are applying for it doesn't count for much for most hiring managers.

 

My long term position have been contract to hire positions, and I'm currently in another contract position due to relocating.  Contracting is a great way to get into IT, and to get experience.  However you're going to need the certifications for people to want to interview you for those positions.

 

Civilians do not understand what a person with military experience brings to the table.  Once you can get your foot in the door you can show them your value, but again, you're going to need the certifications to open the door.

 

I'm not a fan of certifications, though I have quite a few.  My opinion of certifications is that they show you can be trained to pass a test.  Being able to apply your knowledge is quite a different matter.  However, hiring managers want to see them, so it is a necessary evil to get in the door.



#10 TechnicianOnline

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:50 PM

CompTIA Security+, CompTIA Network+ and CompTIA Server+ is where you want to go. Each one is about as equal as the next, they will get your foot in the door. You will spend about $800 for the entire Bundle for each one. CompTIA will sell you the training and the two exam vouchers for about $700, then you buy some books to get extra training and maybe some online video/training subscriptions or hardware. So each one is around $800, once then you start to apply for entry level IT jobs paying around $10 - $14/hr. Moving forward from that, you can expect to make around $20/hr after your three years in IT.

 

Your military training is important if it has electrical or networking focused. All else will be ignored, why would anyone care about your previous experience if it doesn't benefit your new career path? Just have to keep that into consideration, you might get the occasional "emotional" factor that people seek, I do believe birds of a feather fly together so if you interview with ex-military then you should statistically have a higher chance to get the job.

 

So I guess it really depends on you, what are you making now? What can you be making in another field that isn't in IT? Are you willing to take a step down in salary to invest on your new career path?

 

That being said, it's really as simple as any other job. Provided you get certified, network on Linkedin and go hit up every IT business in your area. It's very rewarding and if you enjoy spending 12+ hours each day on the computer working on new technology or projects, even better!

 

I have a few certs, currently working towards my VMCE, VST, VTSP, Security+ and CCNA. In that order, I have lots to do this year because after three years in IT, I can finally afford it.


A Network isn't something you 'own' or 'have'; you may only wield it like the sword of Excalibur.





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