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Message from Microsoft


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#1 lostsoul65

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 09:02 AM

error 895
BSOD error 333
Blue screen
Toll free phone number to call
Don't re-boot or shut off your computer
This is a laptop

I called Microsoft and they said you might have to take it to a shop and will cost about $300 or we will have one of our tech work about 4 hours with you to solve the problem for $200.

Has anyone ever herd of this before.
Of course I re-booted and it was just fine and am doing another scan.


Edited by hamluis, 22 May 2015 - 09:47 AM.
Moved from MRL to Gen Security - Hamluis.


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#2 shayan8891

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 10:25 AM

I have heard of scams like this that they run from customer service centres based in india
Did you actually see a BSOD?

#3 McSheHe

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 11:28 AM

This is definitely a scam. A legit BSOD will not have a telephone number for you to call



#4 quietman7

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 01:28 PM

The scam involves cyber-criminals creating a message on a web page which looks like a BSOD, and not an actual system BSOD or the result of an ad-supported browser extension (PUP) typically bundled with other free software you download and install.

Examples....

1-855-399-8171.png

bsod-error-333-registry-failure-popup.jp

You may want to start a new topic in the Am I infected? What do I do? forum for assistance with investigating and disinfection if confirmed.
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#5 lostsoul65

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 02:55 PM

That was the message alright and I just used ADWcleaner and that did the job.

#6 quietman7

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:07 PM

:thumbup2:
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#7 Foldingchair

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:12 PM

I honestly can't believe malicious content creaters are so (pardon me for saying this) retarded that they can't even spell correctly. The first step to making your scams look legitimate is proper spelling! Not to mention the poor job done on the fake BSOD. As a tryhard wannabe artist, I see so much wrong with it... It's just not convincing!

 

I don't blame people who don't know much of computers though. It's easy to get lost, and a deep blue screen like that is always scary. :smash:


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#8 quietman7

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:20 PM

Grammar and spelling errors are one of the first obvious signs of a scam but many users still fall victim.
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#9 Foldingchair

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:31 PM

Grammar and spelling errors are one of the first obvious signs of a scam but many users still fall victim.

 

That's true. But at least it's a good way to identify scams. Here's hoping that the writers stay dumb.


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#10 quietman7

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:41 PM

It has been proven time and again that the user is a more substantial factor (weakest link) in security than the architecture of the operating system or installed protection software.
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#11 lostsoul65

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:50 PM

http://www.top10antivirussoftware.com/?kw=best%20computer%20security%20software&c=67173980905&t=search&p=&m=e&adpos=1t1&dev=c&devmod=&mobval=0&ts=c&a=666&gclid=CMXNgcyb1sUCFUOUaQodATwAbQ

This website said McAfee is the best? Windows Defender on windows 8 is the same as microsoft security essentials. So I had at go to ADWcleaner to get rid of the scam virus because Windows Defender couldn't do it so I'm wondering what would be the best to get rid of spyware and viruses and programs that do damage?

#12 quietman7

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 03:54 PM

Windows 8 integrates Windows 8 Defender, a more robust version of Windows Defender (and uses that name) for its anti-virus and anti-malware protection. Although it uses the same name, it is not the same as Defender in previous operating systems. Windows Defender 8 provides the same level of protection against malware as Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) provides on older operation systems and uses the same daily virus definition updates. Therefore, you cannot use Microsoft Security Essentials with Windows 8...in fact MSE is blocked from installation.

If you have not done so already, you may want to read these topics:
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#13 rp88

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 04:11 PM

In the context of scams like this on a web page (as opposed to scams like this being performed by malicious browser extensions or malicious software) as shown in the second image on post#4, these sort of pop-ups and messages can be prevented by running NoScript. I haven't seen a single "your computer is infected" scam pop-up or "the web page at example.com says:" dialog box since I installed Noscript, before then they were appearing all over the place, sometimes on large and extremely legitimate sites (like news sites)because the pop-up or dialog box was generated by an advert on the page. I recognised them especially because they said things like "your java plugin is out of date", when I knew I didn't have java installed at all.



Post #9: "Here's hoping that the writers stay dumb"
They do it deliberately. Just like email scammers they deliberately make spelling mistakes and associate themselves with well known scamming locations, organsiations and techniques because this lets them filter out the half-suspicous people before they have to put in more effort in the next stage of a scam. Notice how many scam emails actually start with the sentence "I am from [location often associated with scams] and contacting you for [reason which most would find very hard to believe]..." . Basically by making "spelin miztaks" they can ensure anyone who might believe a legitimate looking prompt/email/pop-up but then realise it's true nature when it came to the phonecall or reply email is filtered out, they ensure only the most vulnerable will respond by making mistakes to scare off everyone else. This is because it takes almost no effort for the scammers to spread the original pop-up/dialog/email/prompt but some effort for scammers to convince people on the phone, or in a reply email, that they are genuine. So the scammers don't mind only a tiny proportion of the people seeing the original pop-up/email/prompt beleiving it but would like to make sure all those who do are already at the stage of being fully tricked into believing all the subsequent stages of the scam. "Speeling and gramur" mistakes are a tactic used by scammers to narrow their targeting of vulnerable prey.

Edited by rp88, 23 May 2015 - 04:12 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#14 Foldingchair

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 04:24 PM

In the context of scams like this on a web page (as opposed to scams like this being performed by malicious browser extensions or malicious software) as shown in the second image on post#4, these sort of pop-ups and messages can be prevented by running NoScript. I haven't seen a single "your computer is infected" scam pop-up or "the web page at example.com says:" dialog box since I installed Noscript, before then they were appearing all over the place, sometimes on large and extremely legitimate sites (like news sites)because the pop-up or dialog box was generated by an advert on the page. I recognised them especially because they said things like "your java plugin is out of date", when I knew I didn't have java installed at all.



Post #9: "Here's hoping that the writers stay dumb"
They do it deliberately. Just like email scammers they deliberately make spelling mistakes and associate themselves with well known scamming locations, organsiations and techniques because this lets them filter out the half-suspicous people before they have to put in more effort in the next stage of a scam. Notice how many scam emails actually start with the sentence "I am from [location often associated with scams] and contacting you for [reason which most would find very hard to believe]..." . Basically by making "spelin miztaks" they can ensure anyone who might believe a legitimate looking prompt/email/pop-up but then realise it's true nature when it came to the phonecall or reply email is filtered out, they ensure only the most vulnerable will respond by making mistakes to scare off everyone else. This is because it takes almost no effort for the scammers to spread the original pop-up/dialog/email/prompt but some effort for scammers to convince people on the phone, or in a reply email, that they are genuine. So the scammers don't mind only a tiny proportion of the people seeing the original pop-up/email/prompt beleiving it but would like to make sure all those who do are already at the stage of being fully tricked into believing all the subsequent stages of the scam. "Speeling and gramur" mistakes are a tactic used by scammers to narrow their targeting of vulnerable prey.

 

Hm... Reverse psychology? Interesting!


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#15 quietman7

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 04:55 PM

Post #9: "Here's hoping that the writers stay dumb"

Actually most are quite skilled and knowledgable with various motives for doing what they do.
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