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#1 nickautomatic

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 06:16 PM

Can anyone explain or give an information about if someone ask you for example "no update yet"? Which answer is correct?
"Yes, no update yet" or "No, update yet". Please enlighten our mind (who are in doubt too) what is the correct sentence such question.



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 07:01 PM

I would have to say that my immediate response to being asked the question 'No update yet?' would be on the lines of 'How do you mean?', but grammaticaly both 'Yes, no update yet' and No, no update yet'  would be correct and essentially supply exactly the same information.

 

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#3 Animal

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 07:16 PM

Can anyone explain or give an information about if someone ask you for example "no update yet"? <snip>


Grammar not withstanding. My reply to the question would be. "That is correct. There is no update available at this time."

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#4 Platypus

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 07:26 PM

I agree with Chris that English is sufficiently flexible and imprecise that either answer could convey the meaning. It seems silly I know.

 

The way I would understand it is that an abbreviated query like "No update yet?" has an implied context which we need to fill in, something like:

 

"(Am I correct in thinking there has been) no update yet?"

 

Like Animal says, I'd normally try to recognize the uncertainty, and aim to accommodate the context in my reply, rather than just saying yes or no.

 

Our response is influenced by our understanding of the implied context, and I'd answer much the same as Animal suggests.

 

However in an informal context like a colleague I speak to about computer matters frequently, I might well simply answer "No", and it would be understood as "Correct, there is no update."


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#5 nickautomatic

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 01:32 PM

Thanks for the information guys.



#6 Naught McNoone

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 12:53 PM

Can anyone explain or give an information about if someone ask you for example "no update yet"?

 

Is that the same as telling a user to "Go ahead and backup?"   :crazy:

 

Cheers!

 

Naught.






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