Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How to create a Windows XP recovery floppy?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Sylveon Fetish

Sylveon Fetish

  • Members
  • 426 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:04 AM

Posted 20 May 2015 - 02:40 PM

I seem to cannot find anything on the net besides this. But the information on the Microsoft website is incorrect. There isn't a "system tools" or anything related anywhere that I can find. Microsoft usually spells it out for me like I'm 5 but this one's missing something or getting something wrong. Please help

Thank you



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 CoreyMartin

CoreyMartin

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA! USA!
  • Local time:11:04 AM

Posted 21 May 2015 - 03:46 PM

Hello, my name is Corey and I am new to the forums.

I am more than sure that a recovery disk would not fit on a floppy drive, due to low space. If you have a DVD or CD, or even a floppy disk, you should use that instead.



#3 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 8,120 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:03:04 PM

Posted 22 May 2015 - 02:42 AM

I seem to cannot find anything on the net besides this. But the information on the Microsoft website is incorrect. There isn't a "system tools" or anything related anywhere that I can find. Microsoft usually spells it out for me like I'm 5 but this one's missing something or getting something wrong. Please help
Thank you

These instructions seem more comprehensive:

How to Set up and Use Automated System Recovery in Windows XP

#4 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 8,120 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:03:04 PM

Posted 22 May 2015 - 02:43 AM

Hello, my name is Corey and I am new to the forums.
I am more than sure that a recovery disk would not fit on a floppy drive, due to low space. If you have a DVD or CD, or even a floppy disk, you should use that instead.


Welcome to Bleeping Computer. :)

According to the instructions, this recovery disk is a single 1.44MB floppy.

I bet I'm as surprised as you are. :)

Edited by Al1000, 22 May 2015 - 02:45 AM.


#5 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,854 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:04 AM

Posted 22 May 2015 - 07:53 AM

I do not think the OP is looking for a ASR floppy disk but rather a recovery console disk which cannot be put on a floppy. The ASR floppy which is not bootable is created during a ASR backup. Doing a ASR recovery is a last resort at it reformats the system partition and put the computer in a minimal boot state. 

 

During the ASR backup process, you're asked to insert a blank, formatted floppy to create a system recovery disk (commonly called an ASR floppy). This floppy is critical to the ASR restore process, so it's worth digging a little deeper into how it's used. The ASR backup process saves two files onto your floppy: the ASR state file (asr.sif), which contains information about the disk signatures and configuration of disk volumes on your machine, and asrpnp.sif, which contains information about different Plug and Play devices on your system. These two files are critical for the recovery of your system, because they connect the underlying hardware configuration with the operating system above it. As we'll see in a moment, you need to insert this floppy at the beginning of the ASR restore, in order to rebuild the disk subsystem and hardware configuration of your system before restoring the contents of the system and boot volumes.

 

The ASR restore process in a nutshell is as follows: first, the disk configurations are restored; then, your system and boot volumes are formatted; and, finally, a bare-bones version of Windows is installed that starts Backup and rebuilds your system and boot volumes from your ASR backup set stored on tape media.

 

 

wsh_1009.gif






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users