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How to Manage Systemd Services on a Linux System


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 04:29 PM

Thanks to  Chris Hoffman at howtogeek.com for this article.

 

 

Systemd is now used by default in most Linux distributions, from Fedora and Red Hat to Ubuntu, Debian, openSUSE, and Arch. The systemctl command allows you to get information about systemd’s status and control running services.

Despite the controversy, this at least introduces some standardization across Linux distributions. The same commands will allow you to manage services in the same way on any Linux distribution using systemd.

Note: To modify your system configuration on Linux distribution like Ubuntu that uses sudo, you’ll need to prefix the commands here with sudo. On other Linux distributions, you’ll need to become the root user with the su command first.

How to Manage Systemd Services on a Linux System

 

 

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#2 cat1092

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 12:13 AM

Nick, I've tried to get this thing going, have added all of the software that the Package Manager suggests, and come back with this. 

 

 

cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ sudo systemd --version

[sudo] password for cat: 
sudo: systemd: command not found
cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ 
 

 

Now, I know those services are installed because I just took the time to do so, all that were shown. 

 

Earlier, I upgraded my NVIDIA drivers from 346 to 349 w/out issue (all from the Package Manager), so don't know what's going on here. Note that I'm soon planning a clean install, not only to gain over 100GiB in /home space, more importantly to purge all of the leftovers of 'fresh upgrades' from my system. Dating back to Mint 12. Being I know that the root partition is being formatted, there has to be 'hidden' folders in the /home partition, other than those in the home folder that's shown on the desktop, that are holding all of these largely unused settings from previous Mint builds. 

 

Now that I know how to install NVIDIA graphics & also how to hide the unwanted drivers, and want to expand /home, now is as good as time as any for a clean install. 

 

Maybe then this option will work. It is quite useful. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 May 2015 - 12:21 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 12:30 AM

Will come in handy on my Debian 8 vm.

 

@Cat1092

 

You installed Systemd on Linux Mint?



#4 NickAu

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 12:33 AM

http://wiki.debian.org/systemd


Edited by NickAu, 12 May 2015 - 12:39 AM.


#5 cat1092

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 12:44 AM

 

You installed Systemd on Linux Mint?

 

 

hollowface yes, but will now be removing it. Didn't realize it's primarily targeted for Debian users. 

 

Some of these advanced tools, I seldom use anyway, just wanted to take it for a spin. With a 40GB root partition, need to keep the OS as small as possible. If it were something that I were going to use a lot, it's worth the install, if not, a waste of time. The only reason that I tried this was because am about to fresh install the entire system anyway. Will backup my virtual machines to a HDD formatted to ext4 (not using Timeshift nor Aptik) just drag & drop to the HDD & back after install. 

 

There are many times when less is more. 

 

EDIT: How about this crap, these services were just added, now half are saying that many other essential packages will be removed. When I re-install, will only be adding what I'm using & that's it. No point in adding extra choices that will be forgotten in less than a week. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 May 2015 - 12:53 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 01:13 AM

I would imagine the next release of Linux Mint will probably have systemd since Ubuntu has it now.



#7 cat1092

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 01:48 AM

Hopefully so with 17.2 when it ships, however all of Linux Mint 17 builds will be based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, that may come into the overall picture. 

 

Though I understand why the Mint team did this, being held hostage to waiting for every Ubuntu build, then having to fast track release an OS that may not be 'road ready' yet. This allows the Mint team to focus on improving their product, and not playing the sit & wait game with Ubuntu. 

 

The only thing about this approach, is that for some users, the software won't be in the Package or Software Manager. Though PPA's can easily be added, this was how I initially installed the 346.59 version of the NVIDIA graphics drivers. Now am at 349.16 & things seems to be stable. 

 

 

cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ inxi -Fx

System:    Host: cat-XPS-8700 Kernel: 3.13.0-37-generic x86_64 (64 bit, gcc: 4.8.2) 
           Desktop: N/A Distro: Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca
Machine:   System: Dell product: XPS 8700
           Mobo: Dell model: 0KWVT8 version: A00 Bios: Dell version: A10 date: 12/08/2014
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i7-4770 CPU (-HT-MCP-) cache: 8192 KB flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 27137 
           Clock Speeds: 1: 3401.00 MHz 2: 3401.00 MHz 3: 3401.00 MHz 4: 3401.00 MHz 5: 3401.00 MHz 6: 3401.00 MHz 7: 3401.00 MHz 8: 3401.00 MHz
Graphics:  Card: NVIDIA Device 1401 bus-ID: 01:00.0 X.Org: 1.15.1 driver: nvidia Resolution: 1920x1080@60.0hz 
           GLX Renderer: GeForce GTX 960/PCIe/SSE2 GLX Version: 4.5.0 NVIDIA 349.16 Direct Rendering: Yes
Audio:     Card-1: NVIDIA Device 0fba driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1 Sound: ALSA ver: k3.13.0-37-generic
           Card-2: Intel 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset High Definition Audio Controller driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
           Card-3: Logitech driver: USB Audio usb-ID: 046d:0829
Network:   Card-1: Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6235 driver: iwlwifi ver: in-tree: bus-ID: 04:00.0
           IF: wlan0 state: down mac: c4:85:08:40:98:27
           Card-2: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller 
           driver: r8169 ver: 2.3LK-NAPI port: d000 bus-ID: 03:00.0
           IF: eth0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: b8:ca:3a:97:33:8f
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 1140.3GB (8.1% used) 1: id: /dev/sda model: WDC_WD5003ABYX size: 500.1GB 
           2: id: /dev/sdb model: Samsung_SSD_840 size: 128.0GB 3: id: /dev/sdc model: Crucial_CT256M55 size: 256.1GB 
           4: id: /dev/sdd model: Crucial_CT256M55 size: 256.1GB 
Partition: ID: / size: 40G used: 8.5G (23%) fs: ext4 ID: /home size: 173G used: 78G (48%) fs: ext4 
           ID: swap-1 size: 4.32GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap 
RAID:      No RAID devices detected - /proc/mdstat and md_mod kernel raid module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 29.8C mobo: 27.8C gpu: 0.0:33C 
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A 
Info:      Processes: 269 Uptime: 3:37 Memory: 2950.7/32126.8MB Runlevel: 2 Gcc sys: 4.8.2 Client: Shell inxi: 1.8.4 
cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ 
 

 

Glad to see something working right, everyone who has a NVIDIA card knows there's going to be frequent updates, and there will be a way for Linux users to get these. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 May 2015 - 01:49 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 03:26 PM


Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 is based on the current Debian 8 Jessie release, and the latest stable release of Debian does use systemd as its default. But LMDE 2 still uses the old SysV init system by default.

- REF: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2921385/its-optional-for-now-but-linux-mint-expects-to-switch-to-systemd-next-year.html

 


Linux Mint’s developers don’t seem particularly upset by systemd. Sure, they’re being conservative and waiting before flipping the switch, allowing others to work out as many kinks as possible.

- REF: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2921385/its-optional-for-now-but-linux-mint-expects-to-switch-to-systemd-next-year.html

 


The move to systemd could happen with Linux Mint 18 and LMDE 3, giving this new technology and the Linux ecosystem 2 years (or more) to mature and to iron out integration and compatibility issues. Cinnamon in particular is built without systemd support by default and the development team is planning to change this in version 2.6

- REF: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2764

 

Sounds like Linux Mint will eventually switch to systemd, but the Linux Mint devs aren't in any rush to do so.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 01:40 AM

 

 

Sounds like Linux Mint will eventually switch to systemd, but the Linux Mint devs aren't in any rush to do so.

 

hollowface, that's a smart move on their end, not to be rushed. 

 

Because when version 16, a short term release came out, there were reports of the OS not being secure enough for transactions, and they had some patching to do. Fortunately Linux Mint has a large following, and there were likely some of their most dedicated users helping with this. 

 

From what I've read, this played a huge part with Clem sticking with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for all of Mint 17 releases. And why not? Ubuntu will offer another LTS in at most a couple of more years, if that long, they have a roadmap just as Microsoft does for Windows releases. I just haven't checked it out lately. Just looked for it, kind of hard to find, though I have seen it a few times. 

 

By then, Linux Mint users will gain some of the things that current Ubuntu users are running now, and those users will have a steady, rather than a 'bleeding edge' type of OS. Though it's likely that many who jumps to the next release, even while in the last stages of Preview, will always want the latest Ubuntu possible. That's the way I was with Mint, after a couple of short releases, I didn't use 14 or 15 at all, but did 16. Mint 17 isn't a whole lot different from 16 in some respects, though there were 'under the hood' enhancements added, such as native SSD support. 

 

I just wouldn't know what to do w/out my Linux Mint, a strong breeze of fresh air after running Windows for a day or two. It's getting time for me to dump some of these installs, half of which are test beds. 

 

Hopefully Systemd will happen with Linux Mint 18, though it'll largely depend on what Ubuntu does. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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