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Another One Bites The Dust


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9 replies to this topic

#1 NotAnEngineer

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 12:52 PM

I've had an HP Pavilion for several years that only gets sporadic use.  Skype and watching movies.  From day one it has been an overheating sucker so that is why I only use it for things that don't put too much demand on it.  The hard drive died several months and instead of shipping it to them for repairs, I bought my own hard drive and they sent me the install disks.

 

My first question is this:

 

If I buy a new hard drive, will I be able to use the disks that HP sent me to install on a new hard drive years ago?  It's going into the same system, and the disks are called "System Recovery DVD Windows 7 Recovery Media for Windows 7 Products Service Pack 1,  Disk 1 of 2 and Disk 2 of 2"

 

My second question is this:

 

Is the overheating the cause of the multiple deaths of hard drives?

 

The laptop itself is an HP Pavilion dv4-4141 us Entertainment PC   

 

p.s. I think the hard drive is dying because it sounds just like it did when the first one died -- lots of clicky noises on boot up which will eventually lead to "no hard drive present" if my crystal ball is right.  But I could be wrong!

 

 



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#2 zcomputerwiz

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:06 PM

If I buy a new hard drive, will I be able to use the disks that HP sent me to install on a new hard drive years ago?  It's going into the same system, and the disks are called "System Recovery DVD Windows 7 Recovery Media for Windows 7 Products Service Pack 1,  Disk 1 of 2 and Disk 2 of 2"

 

Is the overheating the cause of the multiple deaths of hard drives?

 

To answer Q#1, yes - you can use your factory recovery media to restore the operating system and preloaded software to any replacement drive (assuming it is large enough) in that laptop.

To answer Q#2, yes - heat is a big problem for laptop hard drives and could be the cause of repeated failures. That said, it could just as easily be other problems such as free-fall and impact or manufacturing defects causing your problems.

 

Personally I only use solid state drives for laptops these days, my observed failure rate for brand new conventional hard drives in laptops at the office was getting rather absurd at about 1 in 3 within a year.


Have you tried turning it off and on again?


#3 NotAnEngineer

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:23 PM

thanks for your reply, wiz.  the original drive was around 350 gigs, which I couldn't find at any store at the time so i bought 500 gb.  could that make it run hotter?  it;s so hard to tell if it's "worse" than the original, since both of them have been running it's "cool sense" constantly, and sounds like an airplane lifting off at times.  I am interested in switching it to a solid state drive.  Which one should I get?



#4 TechnicianOnline

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:32 PM

NotAnEngineer,

 

Sounds like your laptop has poor ventilation. As stated above it's a solid yes to your questions.

You can do this. I would suggest just paying the extra $60/$80 for a solid state drive (SSD).

You will notice a huge increase in performance and down the line you can re-use it on another computer should you upgrade.

 

Also look into getting a good laptop cooler. You should look into cleaning out the fan as well, buy some compressed air then watch videos on youtube to disassemble your laptop, clean it out.

If you feel confident enough replace the thermal paste as well, expect to sit down on a table for about 2/4 hours. Be patient, you can do it just pay attention to detail and take your time.


Edited by TechnicianOnline, 11 May 2015 - 01:32 PM.

A Network isn't something you 'own' or 'have'; you may only wield it like the sword of Excalibur.


#5 zcomputerwiz

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:48 PM

A larger drive shouldn't run any hotter.

 

Assuming HP didn't set their software to prevent restoring to a smaller drive you should be OK with a 240GB SSD.

Make sure you have a Windows Vista disc handy just in case the recovery media won't run; I can't be sure if HP will complain if the SSD is smaller than the drive that originally shipped with the laptop and the price for 500GB SSDs is rather steep (~$200+).

 

I usually go with Sandisk, Crucial, Kingston, Samsung, or Intel for SSD vendors depending on who is running the best deal at the moment.

NewEgg is a good website to order from.


Have you tried turning it off and on again?


#6 NotAnEngineer

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:51 PM

Thanks technician.  Since the overheating from day one, I keep a circulating fan nearby.  I also invented stilts for the bottom of the laptop to allow cool air to circulate better.  I did buy compressed air and found a youtube video showing someone taking this exact unit apart and cleaning it, and replacing the (can't remember) and applying thermal paste.  But haven't yet gotten up the nerve to take it apart.  Someday I'll tell you my watch battery story, it involves a desk and a hammer and a poor outcome ;)



#7 NotAnEngineer

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 01:53 PM

A larger drive shouldn't run any hotter.

 

Assuming HP didn't set their software to prevent restoring to a smaller drive you should be OK with a 240GB SSD.

Make sure you have a Windows Vista disc handy just in case the recovery media won't run; I can't be sure if HP will complain if the SSD is smaller than the drive that originally shipped with the laptop and the price for 500GB SSDs is rather steep (~$200+).

 

I usually go with Sandisk, Crucial, Kingston, Samsung, or Intel for SSD vendors depending on who is running the best deal at the moment.

NewEgg is a good website to order from.

 

 

Thanks!  It's windows 7, but I do have a Vista package that I would love to install on this instead of win 7!  I will start exploring SSD's immediately. 



#8 zcomputerwiz

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 02:12 PM

Sorry, that was a typo - I did mean Windows 7  :thumbup2:


Have you tried turning it off and on again?


#9 NotAnEngineer

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 02:38 PM

Sorry, that was a typo - I did mean Windows 7  :thumbup2:

That's okay I had a feeling it was, and my lamentation of the passing of Vista is one that I just think sometimes, "wow, if only I could just install Vista on that brand new laptop."  Okay there is a 240g solid state drive at best buy, my only question does it  connect in the same fashion as the other?  Should i take the old one along to make sure it will fit?  (can't imagine why it wouldn't fit but if there's a will, there's a way)



#10 zcomputerwiz

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 02:45 PM

You want a 2.5" SATA SSD, it should install just like your SATA conventional HDD.

 

There are some other form factors like MSATA, M.2, etc. - these will not work in your laptop.


Have you tried turning it off and on again?





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