Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Photonics and Quantum Computing


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 paul88ks

paul88ks

  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:08:49 AM

Posted 06 May 2015 - 02:59 AM

http://www.hpl.hp.com/news/2008/oct-dec/photonics2.html --- I realize this is an old article,but I wondered if anyone has heard any recent news about HP's efforts in this area. Some of the videos and lectures I watched a few years ago were fascinating and down right mind-blowing. Of course,at the beginning,no one would be able to afford a machine with this architechure,but say in 15 years or so??? Comments? Anything new?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:08:49 AM

Posted 06 May 2015 - 04:25 AM

http://www.hpl.hp.com/research/systems-research/   something I just watched!!! http://www.newsweek.com/quantum-computers-will-make-your-laptop-look-abacus-327676- last post for tonight - I promise !


Edited by paul88ks, 06 May 2015 - 04:33 AM.


#3 shival

shival

  • Members
  • 38 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:49 PM

Posted 18 May 2015 - 05:05 PM

Quantum computing sounds nice, but I guess us, normal citizens, wont be getting our hands on it anywhere soon.

Computers like that would allow to break literally any currently used crypting and security measures, so... yeah.



#4 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:08:49 AM

Posted 18 May 2015 - 08:42 PM

Quantum computing sounds nice, but I guess us, normal citizens, wont be getting our hands on it anywhere soon.

Computers like that would allow to break literally any currently used crypting and security measures, so... yeah.

Shival- you are absolutely right,since data would be moving at the speed of light,it would be too fast for any conventional software to catch it.

 

This is already a concern of most of the modern countries in the world ,including the U.S. because of National Security issues.

This will be the Cyber-arms race of our generation.As our computers become more and more powerful,the software that runs on them will have to be just as sophisticated.



#5 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,895 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:49 PM

Posted 19 May 2015 - 11:15 AM

Shival is right, but not because of "data moving at the sped of light". Currently when computers communicate across the internet some of the data already moves at the speed of light (along fibre optic cables, or through the air as radio and micro waves)(tehcnicall the sped of light divided by the refractive index of the mdeium, but this is pretty close to the speed of light in free space).


The reason that quantum computers have such potential for breaking and making encryptions is because of something totally different, entanglement.

A quantum computer works on the principle of perfomring computations with qubits (quantum bits) instead of normal bits. A normal bit can be a 1 or a 0 at any time a quantum bit can be both at once. Also when you have a collection of normal bits they are ech a 1 or a 0, when you have a collection of qubits they are all in a shared superpositon of many states, taking all the possible values of your collection at once. This means quantum computers can run some very unusual algoritms which let normally slow "trial and error" based "brute force" tasks (like factorising a number into two prime factors) be done much more rapidly, this ability to skip the trial and error bit and just get straight to an answer is what means quantum computers could break any encryption, because the current best encryption systems use assymetric ciphers where there is a public key (related to a single huge number) and a private key (related to the two prime factors of that number) and quantum computers are very good at factorising.

The reason quantum computers can also MAKE (as well as break) ciphers is because they can use entangled channels to communiate between a sender and receiver, any eavesdropper attempting to snoop on the channel would break the entanglement and therefore be unable to extract any useful information, the breaking of entanglement would also signal to the receiving party that their communications were being spied upon. In theory it would be against the laws of physics for any method of successfully intercepting the quantm channel to work, although the message could still be snooped on by anyone watching the wires between alice's computer and her end of the quantum link, or anyone watching the wires between bob's end of the quantum link and his computer.

In the past the american government was so scared of encryption that they tried to treat it's export like the export of armaments, so how scared many governments (and also citizens with private data to hide, that is anyone who has ever logged into an https website) would be of a working quantum computer is easy to imagine.

Edited by rp88, 19 May 2015 - 11:16 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users