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Updates to avoid


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#1 Pestyone

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:56 PM

Using win 8.1 64 bit with i.e. 11.0 and wondering which updates I need to avoid in up dating so MS 

 

doesn t sneak win 10 etc onto my setup and what other stuff I don t need. 

 

Can somebody post an updated list  -  thanks



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#2 Aura

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 09:35 PM

Hi again Pestyone :)

You know that the update that "sneak is" Windows 10 on your system is harmless, right? It's only to prepare a future "upgrade advisor" like there was on Windows Vista and Windows 7. Are they harmful? Not at all. So what's the problem with installing them? Plus, Windows 10 is still a Technical Preview, Microsoft won't force you to update to that kind of OS, nor will it force you with a headlock to upgrade to Windows 10 in the future.

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#3 jcgriff2

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 11:11 PM

I would advise allowing ALL Windows Updates to download & install.

 

Regards. . .

 

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#4 dc3

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:37 AM

Because of the number of updates which Microsoft has recalled I've set my updates to let me choose what and when I will install these.  This provides me with enough time to learn whether the update is going to be problematic or not.  

 

As for being forced to upgrade a Windows operating system, Microsoft would not do this.  Oh Wait... They have! :hysterical:

 

Windows 8.1 falls under the same lifecycle policy as Windows 8, and will reach end of Mainstream Support on January 9, 2018, and end of Extended Support on January 10, 2023. With the General Availability of Windows 8.1, customers on Windows 8 have 2 years, until January 12, 2016, to move to Windows 8.1 in order to remain supported.

 

This is an excerpt from a article at WindowsITPro.  If nothing else, this article is thought provoking, but is also disconcerting.  What I find particularly disconcerting is the use of the term "Service Pack" used by Microsoft when referring to the Windows 8.1 "upgrade".  ToastyTech addresses the duplicity in language as well.  If this is recognized as a Service Pack there are implications that the same support or lack there of without the latest Service Pack will be applicable to Windows 8.

 

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#5 rp88

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:44 AM

I run a thread monitoring windows updates and reporting which are safe, which are buggy, which are important, which help with security, which don't and which appear to do nasty things. The updates you really need to keep up-to-date on are the security ones(they are named "Security Update for..."), these should be installed as quickly as possible after they are released. All other updates can wait a few days for a chance to see if others report them to be buggy (cause crashes) or nasty (do things a user might not want doing in the background), if one of these other updates is buggy or nasty a user is quite safe to not install that one. You should set updates to "check automatically but ask me before downloading or installing", that way you can:
a ) make sure update install at a time which is convenient for you

b ) reject updates which are buggy or nasty, if you come across any

Buy you must make sure to (every tuesday evening or wednesday morning) check what is being offered by going into control panel-->windows update on a regualr basis, so you cn make sure to install the security updates when they come out, and be aware of what other updates are being offered as well.
The thread is here
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/551980/the-windows-updates-monitoring-thread/

As a quick summary, If you are an 8.0 user you will want to reject KB2973544, KB3008273, KB2871389 (reject this and you won't see the others) and KB2865699. These four play a role in forcibly upgrading a user to 8.1, to keep your operating system supported you need to make that upgrade before january 2016, but best to do it in your own time, when you have a weekedn free or something, and not at a time when an update decicdes it wants you to upgrade.

If you are an 8.1 user you probably want to avoid, KB2976978 KB3013816 KB3035583 KB3044374. Some of these prepare the ground for windows 10, if you want to upgrade to 10 at some point (although it's not even released yet so this isn't something to think about for several months) probably bst to do it at a time of your choosing, it is not clear whether these updates simply produce nag prompts or do things which are more forcible. KB3013816 you probably want to avoid for a different reaon, if my interpretation of it's decription is correct it forces a use t use an ms account, forces bitlocker to be turned on and forces a user to use fully automatc updates.

Also as a general rule all users shuld be wary of updates to drivers, firmware bios or uefi, these types of updates can brick a computer is they are buggy. They give only minimal benefit so should only be performed by users who are in a situation where they know there current driver/bios/firmware/uefi is not working properly at present but would after the update is performed. This sort of update usually adds functionality for users of a particular type of computer or users with particular components, if you don't have the relevant computer type or components such updates will do nothing for you.

The thread is updates as an when updates come out, or when someone hears news of a buggy or nasty update, or when someone experiences a buggy or nasty update. For discussing a large amount of detail about a prticular updates, or solving problems on emight have caused a new thread should be started instead, though solving the prolems of a problem update can usually be fixed by uninstalling it from within control panel. If you can't boot properly for any reason having a system image is helpful.
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/ scroll down to part 3. On windows 8.1 the option for making images is found in a different place, control panel-->file history-->System image backup. On 8.0 it is at control panel-->windows 7 file recovery-->Create a system image. Note that a system image made after a particular update is installed will contain that update built in, if you make a system image after an update you don't like and load from that system image, you probbly can't uninstall that update, so on a new machine make a system image before updating, just incase of buggy or nasty ones.

Edited by rp88, 04 May 2015 - 10:57 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 jcgriff2

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 12:39 AM

Great idea - the monitoring thread.

 

For some unknown reason, I have never, ever experienced a Windows Update problem on any of my systems since late 2007, when I learned Windows (went behind the Desktop for the very 1st time) under Vista. 

 

Since then, all systems in the house update automatically and as I said - very fortunate to never have had a problem.

 

I should also mention that Windows does get reinstalled at the drop of a hat, especially with Windows 7 + 8.1 installation media being a USB stick + SSDs.  Very, very fast reinstalls.


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#7 Aura

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 10:08 AM

I'm in the same situation as you. I never had a single issue with Windows Updates. I always installed the "buggy" ones, the ones that get rolled back and the ones that cause software conflicts (like the one with Kaspersky products recently, and I run Kaspersky Internet Security 2015) and I never had a single issue, not even slowness caused by installing these Windows Updates. I'm telling myself that it's because I manage my system well and if there's an issue or something that could become one in the future, I take care of it right away. Personally, I would always install the Important Windows Updates, since these are security-related, and leave the Recommended Updates as manual picks, and leave out the drivers updates.

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#8 rp88

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 01:32 PM

Regarding post #6: "...Very, very fast reinstalls."
Just to mention, on windows 8 and 8.1 ( I can't speak for 7 as I haven't used it) restoring from an image is pretty quick to, as long as the image was made when the computer didn't have too mnay files and programs on it's harddrive. If you store the mage on a fairly fast externa HDD it can reimage in about 20 minutes, if you store the image on a USB drive it can do it in about 45 minutes. Remmber that UNLESS your disc is partitioned into C:\ for windows and programs alongside D:\ for personal files then all files on it will be written over during a reimage or reinstall. If the disc is partitioned then personal fiels on D:\ can survive a reimage (and perhaps a reinstall), but most computers come without this partitioning so best to back your files up to USB before reimaging, if you can get to them.


Regarding post #7:"...the "Important" Windows Updates, since these are security-related"
In the following paragraph the word "important" means classified as important in the list, the word important means as it normally would.
Not always. "Important" ones can be either security or a bug fix for common bugs or a functionality "improving" update which ms thinks will be particularly popular, the security ones are very important but the bug fixes can be done without for a while and for some users some of the functionality ones will not be wanted at all. Security updates are apparent by being named "Security Update for ...", they are always classified as "important" but so are some non-security things, For example KB2871389 is classed as "important" (but not security) and you probably wouldn't want it on an 8.0 machine. Also many of the buggy ones have been non-security but "important", so letting "important" updates be fully automated isn't much different to letting all updates be on full auto. Updates must be considered individually. There isn't a setting to let the security ones be fully automated and the others be manual, you either choose "all full auto", "all auto download, manual install", "all auto check, manual download and install", "all off(not a good idea)" or ""important" updates on one of those settings, all others on another". I could see the wisdom in having a setting so security ones could be treated differently to all others, but that setting doesn't exist, the only such setting is one to separate "important" from "recommended". In the end the choice of update settings is up to you, but just be aware that if you let "important" ones be fully automatic you'll get some non-security ones being automated as well as the security ones (which you do need). Some functionality changing ones you might not want could be classed as "important".

Also note that sometimes hidden updates (that is updates you have chosen to reject) will unhide themselves and you might need to hide them again if they appear again on the list of those being offered to you.

Edited by rp88, 05 May 2015 - 01:32 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#9 Pestyone

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 03:29 AM

So how do I make an " image " on my 3 T ext  hard drive and why then how do I use it if needed need simple instructions; I

am lost with all the stick chat : (



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 09:00 AM

I would advise allowing ALL Windows Updates to download & install.

 

Regards. . .

 

jcgriff2

If by all you also mean all optional updates including updated drivers I would advise against that. I have found that updating drivers through Windows update can be problematic and actually had to roll back a wireless driver on a compaq laptop because it kept bluescreening. I also look through all optional updates and see if they pertain to me. In one case the update involved the Russian Ruble so I passed.



#11 Aura

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 10:10 AM

You can use Macrium Reflect Free to create a system image of your computer.

http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

You can follow their instructions below to proceed:

http://kb.macrium.com/KnowledgebaseArticle50074.aspx

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#12 rp88

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 11:49 AM

Pestyone, post#9: you can also use the tools within windows to make a system image, it is probably best that you make BOTH a windows system image and a macrium one. Use the windows one if it will work and keep the macrium one for circumstances where window's image fails.


You can make windows system images by following the instructions at this link http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/#manual . 3 Terabytes should be more than enough, if you have your hard-drive partitioned into C:\ for programs and system files, D:\ for personal files and another small partition for various parts of windows you should probably not back up the personal files partition in a system image (rather just back it up by copying files from it onto USB in the normal way). System images are a very inefficient way to backup files, they are for saving the "state of a system", that is all your installed programs and chosen settings. If all your personal files are on the same disc partition as the system files and program files then you will have to put all of them into the system image. If you see any small partitions called things like "system reserved" then make sure these are ticked to be included in the image, if you have any manufacturer's recovery partitions you should probably not include these in the image.


JohnC_21 post#10: I more-or-less agree with your advice there, some updates are defintitely NOT needed by most users, so rejecting the non-security ones which bring little relevant benefit to you is a good idea. However small the risks from an update might be, they aren't worth taking if all that update does is change the lithuanian litas symbol into the euro symbol (there was an update which did this recently, because lithuania changed it's currency recently, I don't think this particular update caused crashes, but it is one I remember rejecting because I knew I had no need of it, I mention it as an example of an update which has little relevance to most people, although will matter to a few.).

Edited by rp88, 20 July 2015 - 11:49 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 08:19 PM

JohnC_21 post#10: I more-or-less agree with your advice there, some updates are defintitely NOT needed by most users, so rejecting the non-security ones which bring little relevant benefit to you is a good idea. However small the risks from an update might be, they aren't worth taking if all that update does is change the lithuanian litas symbol into the euro symbol (there was an update which did this recently, because lithuania changed it's currency recently, I don't think this particular update caused crashes, but it is one I remember rejecting because I knew I had no need of it, I mention it as an example of an update which has little relevance to most people, although will matter to a few.).

 

Yes, I remember the update for the lithuania currency change. Passed that one up too and immediately hid it.
 



#14 Pestyone

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Posted 13 August 2015 - 10:44 AM

Ok heres another story about forced updates for which others have mocked me here about MS seems to be using forced updates to get one to

use the bloody awful win 10 and heres another story and any updates on which updates to avoid  : (

 

 

 http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/08/13/windows-10-forced-updates-silent-changes/?utm_campaign=yahootix&partner=yahootix



#15 Aura

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Posted 13 August 2015 - 10:48 AM

Pestyone, this article is about the Windows Update on Windows 10, not Windows Vista, 7, 8 or 8.1. Also, Windows 10 Home users have no control over their Windows Updates, while Pro users have some. This has been known for months now, it's nothing new.

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