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Transferred Raid0 Array.. or so I think?


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#1 lobstarr

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 05:12 PM

My motherboard/cpu fried and replaced it with new ones.

 

Change the SATA config to RAID and was able to recreate the array on the new motherboard. I didn't actually have to actually create it, it just recognized it once I changed the SATA config to RAID and my volume label/name was there (was using/used the Intel Chipset).

 

Only thing now is that obviously the OS won't boot up (BSOD on Boot). I'm able to get on Startup Repair but all the options on there none of them are helping me get into Windows (Restore Point and Automatic Repair). I'm pretty sure this is something beyond that obviously but was wondering if anyone can explain to me what I'm missing or what's going on? And what can I do to fix it if possible?

 

If that fails, I'm okay with reinstalling windows but I'll need help in transferring over my files.

 

TIA!


Edited by lobstarr, 03 May 2015 - 05:14 PM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 12:55 PM

Logically...it seems (to me) unlikely that you would be able to simply move RAID drives to a new motherboard/CPU...I would expect to have to reinstall Windows (with the proper drivers) and reestablish the RAID.

 

The only possible exception that I can think of would be if I had acquired the exact same motherboard...and even then, I would expect to have to reconfigure the RAID.

 

I've always used separate RAID controllers as another component, so I have no idea how a RAID would be set up, using the motherboard controllers/functions provided in the BIOS.

 

Moving topic to Internal Hardware, where the more knowledgeable can probably give you a definitive answer.

 

Louis



#3 zingo156

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 01:59 PM

If both of the sata/raid chipsets were intel, sometimes the raid will work with a new board even if the new motherboard is a newer intel chipset. If you boot to a cd/dvd or USB bootable version of linux, can you see data from the raid array? If so, it must have recognized the raid correctly.

 

Next, if you are having issues booting (BSOD), this is likely due to sata drivers loaded in windows. The catch is this: generally changing the sata setting in bios to IDE, or ATA will allow you to boot to windows and then install the correct sata driver, reboot, change the bios back to SATA and it works, however since this is a RAID setup, you likely can not change these settings without breaking the array which will also break windows.

 

There may be an option using Hirens bootable to replace the sata driver or change the registry setting. (Though it seems the rules have relaxed a bit with this tool, I will not advise the use of these types tools).

 

The other option and IMO the best one, is to boot into linux, copy your data from the raid array to a different drive (outside of the array) and then reload windows on the array.

 

Also just as a note: Raid 0 is one of the more dangerous things in computing if you do not keep up to date backups. If one drive fails, your data is likely all toast, unless you feel like sending the drives to a data recovery specialist which is never cheap nor is it a guarantee.

 

Keep frequent backups, this is a good recommendation even if you do not use raid 0...


Edited by zingo156, 05 May 2015 - 02:12 PM.

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#4 zingo156

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 02:00 PM

Here are some examples of raid chipsets that can be transferred:

 

http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020674.htm


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#5 lobstarr

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 02:43 PM

Hey Zingo!

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

I went from an EVGA X58 to a EVGA Z97 specifically because of the type of raid controller that was used.

 

Do you have a guide or can point me to the right direction on how to use Linux/Ubuntu and the tools I need to download/install to see the data on the drive as well as transfer them? I'm assuming I'll be able to see it right away anyways and if that's the case maybe another guide (commands) on how to transfer the drive to a NAS/another HD?

 

I knew the warnings on the Raid config! I'll probably won't be doing it again. I do have regular backups though and was just using the volume as a boot/scratch disk for media tools like Photoshop, AE, etc.. My NAS is my backup but I don't do whole system backups - since I was too lazy to properly config all of that and did it manually.

 

Cheers



#6 zingo156

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 03:05 PM

The transfer in linux can be the same as in windows, basically copy and paste, I generally use linux Mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

That or I use parted magic which is no longer free :( That was my favorite copy tool, using Grsync. Not a big deal, mint should get the job done.

 

Basically either burn Mint to a disc or create a bootable USB drive with Mint, boot to that disc or USB (there should be a boot to live option), and then you should be able to see your raid array as a standard drive in linux. Then attach another usb drive or connect to your NAS and copy data from the raid array directly to the USB drive or NAS.


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#7 lobstarr

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 11:04 AM

Hey Zingo,

 

I haven't done the above yet but was wondering if I could create an image the (raid) drive onto a single drive? Or would I still get complications?



#8 zingo156

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 11:09 AM

You could create an image or clone of the raid to a single drive and then in theory use one of the above methods (in sata options in bios, disable raid and switch to ide or ata mode), and then boot to windows on the single drive and install the ACHI driver, reboot, go back into bios and switch it to AHCI (instead of raid) and then have working windows.

 

I forgot to mention that switching a motherboard for a newer board may be against the Microsoft Windows licensing (depending on what version you have, Retail, OEM, etc). You may or may not be able to "reactivate" windows.


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