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BSOD - Crash on Restart/Safe Mode - Re-install Windows


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#1 C. Fraser

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:20 PM

Hello,

 

Several days ago, my computer experienced a BSOD with a code irql_not_less_or_equal. 

 

When I tried to restart the computer, as Windows was starting up it BSOD'd again, and now when I try to start the computer, even in safe mode, or trying to restore to a previous point it crashes/BSOD.

 

Reading some stuff about it online, it seems that reinstalling Windows was my best option (I have an OEM 64-bit edition, and if I understand correctly OEM versions of Windows don't have an option to fix it). I'm OK with reinstalling Windows, I'd prefer not to have to of course, but not terrible as I have my important stuff backed up. 

 

So, I put my Windows disk in the DVD tray, and made sure the computer was set to boot with the DVD first, but all that happens is it tries to load Windows and crashes. I've played around with it a bit, tried different setting, but I can't figure out how to get a different result, and I'm not sure if there is something else I should be doing to get it to reinstall Windows, or if it's some bigger issue.

 

 

Few Additional Details

 

I had a couple BSOD over the previous weeks, but had always been able to reboot the computer. The only piece of hardware I had installed recently was a new mouse, and I installed the newest drivers from the company's website. 

 

Any help is appreciated.


Edited by hamluis, 04 May 2015 - 03:55 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:47 PM

System manufacturer and model?

 

If self-built...motherboard manufacturer and model?

 

Have you tried running a hard drive diagnostic?

 

Louis



#3 sflatechguy

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:49 PM

Was the DVD player working before the system crashed? Can you try swapping out the DVD drive for another one?



#4 C. Fraser

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:53 PM

Thanks for the response, Louis.

 

It is self-built.The motherboard is MSI, but I will have to check on the model and reply tomorrow (my computer is a desktop, and I"m using a relatives desktop and probably won't have access again until tomorrow.)

 

I have not tried a hard drive diagnostic, and I'm not sure how to do that under the existing circumstances.



#5 C. Fraser

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 01:55 PM

Was the DVD player working before the system crashed? Can you try swapping out the DVD drive for another one?

 

I don't use the DVD player often. The last time was probably a few weeks ago, and it worked fine then. I don't have access to another DVD drive, unfortunately.



#6 dc3

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 02:39 PM

If you built this computer you should have the installation disc.  If you do, use the instructions below to run the Startup Repair.  You may have to go into the BIOS and change the boot order so that your DVD drive is the first device in the boot order, you HDD the second device.

 

Instructions for a Windows 7 Repair installation.
 
A Windows 7 Repair Installation will require a installation disc.
 
1)  Place the installation disc in the tray of the CD/DVD drive, close the tray and restart the computer.
 
2)  You will be prompted to press any key to start the installation, I find the space bar handy.
 
At this point the setup process will load files, this will take several minutes.
 
3)  You will now need to choose the  Language, Time, currency format, and Keyboard or input method that you'd like to use.
 
After this is done click on Next.
 
w71_zps6dbda47e.png
 
4)  Click on the Repair your computer link at the bottom-left of the Install Windows window.
 
This link will begin the Windows 7 System Recovery Options.
 
w72_zps2a656a0c.png
 
5)  System Recovery Options will now search your hard drive(s) for any Windows 7 installations.  This will take several minutes.
 
No participation is required on your part at this time, wait till it has finished and the next window opens.
 
w73_zpsd5483f05.png
 
6)  Choose the Windows 7 installation that you'd like to perform the Startup Repair on, then click on Next
 
w74_zps490f9a17.png
 
7)  Click on the Startup Repair link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
For a future reference, there are several other diagnostic and recovery tools available in the Windows 7 System Recovery Options including System Restore, System Image Recovery, Windows Memory Diagnostic, and Command Prompt.
 
8)  The Startup Repair tool will now search for problems in the system files.
 
If Startup Repair finds a problem with any system files the tool may suggest a solution which you will need to confirm, or may solve the problem automatically.
 
w76_zps3dd75d83.png
 
9)  Startup Repair will now attempt to repair whatever problems it found with system files.  
 
Note:  If Startup Repair did not find any problems with system files you won't see this step.
 
w77_zpsd8be95eb.png
 
Important: Your computer may or may not restart several times during this repair process.  This is normal, you should allow it to continue until you see the Restart your computer to complete the repairs window. 
 
10)  Click on Finish, this will restart your computer.
 
w78_zpsd49257fb.png
 
It is possible that the Startup Repair will not be able to fix the problem.  If the Startup Repair tool determines this, it may automatically run the the repair after your computer restarts.  If it does not automatically run the repair but you are still having problems with Windows 7 repeat these steps to run Startup Repair again manually.

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#7 hamluis

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 04:27 PM

Re hard drive diagnostic...see the instructions below for running the long generic test using SeaTools for DOS.  You can use this tool whether the system boots into Windows or not, but you will have to change the primary/first boot device from hard drive to optical disk...in the BIOS/Startup.

 

Guide, SeaTools For DOS - http://www.seagate.com/support/seatools/SeaToolsDOSguide.pdf

 

SeaTools for DOS Download - http://www.seagate.com/support/internal-hard-drives/consumer-electronics/ld25-series/seatools-dos-master/

 

Louis



#8 C. Fraser

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 01:31 PM

Thanks Louis!

 

I hate to write this after your helpful posts, but the problem appears to be due to a bad stick of RAM, or maybe a bad slot on the motherboard?. I read some posts about it possibly being a RAM problem, and to play around with the sticks to see what happens, so I thought I'd try it.  I took the second stick of RAM out and I was able to get to the Windows repair option, and now it has loaded properly. 

 

Although, strangely, when the computer was running again, I didn't have an internet connection. I switched out the ethernet cable and it's working fine now. Not sure what happened to the cable, why a BSOD would affect it, or if it was a coincidence, 

 

What is the best way to check if it's the stick of RAM or the motherboard slot?  Can I put the stick in a different slot (there are 4 in total)? When I built the computer I think the instructions said to put the ram in something like a 1-3 positioning, but is there any problem with trying slots 1 and 4 to see if the stick will work in a different slot?



#9 dc3

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 01:37 PM

What is the best way to check if it's the stick of RAM or the motherboard slot?  Can I put the stick in a different slot (there are 4 in total)? When I built the computer I think the instructions said to put the ram in something like a 1-3 positioning, but is there any problem with trying slots 1 and 4 to see if the stick will work in a different slot?

Take a known working module and try it in all of the different slots.  If there is a bad slot the computer will not be able to pass the POST, this means that the computer will not be able to boot into Windows.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 C. Fraser

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 03:40 PM

I tried the one module in all the slots and it worked each time. I switched out the modules and tried the other one in one slot, and it worked....

 

So I put both modules in the same slots as they had originally been seated, and the computer BSODs on start up again.

 

It seems that individually the modules work fine, but using both at the same time there is a problem.  I purchased the two modules together in the same package so they are the same brand/model.  Any idea what might be the problem?



#11 dc3

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 03:44 PM

If there are four slots two of them should be one color and the other two a different color.  Are you installing the two modules in the slots of the same color?


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#12 C. Fraser

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 04:01 PM

Yes, both are in slots of the same color, while the other two slots are a different color.



#13 C. Fraser

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 04:11 PM

There have been several more things that have cropped up, or at least that I've noticed, in the past day, This has been since using just one module.

 

1. A couple of memory_management BSODs

 

2. Window's Update experiences an error. There have been several different codes, the most recent one 8024000E. I followed the advice through Microsoft site to try to fix it (i.e. window's diagnostic tools), but it didn't help.

 

3. I tried to update the AMD drivers, but while downloading the installation software it experienced an error as well, and couldn't finish the installation.

 

4. Could not update Malewarebytes.

 

I tried a system restore to about 2 weeks ago, and after the restore I was able to run a scan with Malewarebytes, but I wasn't able to run a scan with Microsoft Security Essentials, which I had been able to use previous to the restore.

 

So, I don't know what's going on. The interruptions in updating things feels like maybe a virus, but that's just a rookie guess. If reinstalling Windows is a viable option, I'm willing, and tempted to do that just to see what happens. I'm hoping to get some opinions on what might be going on before I resort to that, though.

 

Thanks.






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