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Computer driving me nuts


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#1 shadowk8

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 02:13 PM

I know its a wall of text, but im all out of ideas...

Past week and a half my computers been acting funky. It started with WoW and my monitor loosing connection, then coming back on with just the mouse pointer. Which I had to do a hard reset to cus explorer.exe crashed, but before i did i could still hear the game and friends in the background. Next most of the time when i did a cold boot it would login to windows 8.1 and then flash black on screen when loading the desktop. I would hear the noise windows makes when something new is detected and then it would pop back up with the desktop. So I figured it was my gfx card drivers. Nope revert to the 347.88 drivers for my gtx g1 970 and it happened again. While also forgetting my settings in the nvidia control panel. 

Then after installing back up to the 350.12 drivers chrome would launch and crash instantly after trying to type or click on it with a BEX64 error. After re-installing the nvidia drivers ddu a few times and leaving it on the 350.12 with my comp off for the night chrome was fine again . I also upped the pagefile on my comp from 800mbs to 2gbs. After all this things seemed to be running ok. 

Fast forward to this week, Monday comes and i boot it up and my screen takes a second to display the bios which is weird. Suddenly I hear 3 beeps in rapid succession, and the bios appears with crazy numbers and letters everywhere. This happened all the way to the windows 8.1 logo and bam its fine after that and is at the login screen. Login to the desktop, does the black screen flash as i mention before and everything seems ok. After that i check all the connections and removed the cmos battery for a bit.

Tuesday I had enough and just stress tested the whole 9 yards. memtest, aida64 system stress test for 40mins, upped the voltage on my gfx card from stock, furmark, virus scans, checked gold plating on ram/gfx card, checked plug connections, etc....Nothing.... everything's stable, no errors. Along with giving allowing the page file to be controlled by the system.

Wednesday I boot, and login. , I right click on desktop to goto nvidia control panel click opens then closes instantly. Black flash on screen 5 secs later its is back look in the reliability history see its basically redetected an installed my gtx g1 970 back into the device manager im guessing.

 

Thursday I was told that some people had to install the gigabyte drivers then the new ones and it help them with a simlar problem, it seem all right for 2 days then flash this morning on boot. Right click on desktop no nvidia control panel, after quick flash right click again its there, and make the detection noise that it has found my 970. Look in the Reliability history and it has reinstall it. 

At this point im on my last leg, I have no idea whats causing this to happen, my best guess is that the pci-e slot is dying or the mb, possibly my psu both are 4-6yrs old now. I really doubt its the gfx card its been working great since i got it in January, and had no problems with furmark.

Any help would be wonderful.

Colin

PC specs:
2500k@ 4.3
h100i push/pull
p67a-ud4-b3 bios up to date
16gbs ripjawx 9-9-9-24 1.5v
corsair tx850w 
gtx g1 970 4gb
500gb seagate
250gb 850 evo
64gb crucial m4



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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 10:35 PM

have you inspected your motherboard for damage? bad capacitors, burn marks etc? it sounds like failing hardware to me-and my guess would be either motherboard or PSU.


picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 shadowk8

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 12:13 AM

have you inspected your motherboard for damage? bad capacitors, burn marks etc? it sounds like failing hardware to me-and my guess would be either motherboard or PSU.

I looked around the mb and nothing stood out to me. Tho they are both are my oldest parts.The corsair PSU is 6 yrs old, and the mb 4, still its just weird since at this point it only seems to happen on cold boots, logs in, sits there for a couple seconds with no detection to my second monitor, and black flash, windows re-detects the gfx card and we are good as far as i can tell.

 

People have told me to just format and hope for the best saying its probably a driver issue. I dont know what to think honestly at this point after the stress test to my whole computer pretty much telling me its stable with aida64.

 

Any suggestions ?



#4 WhoX

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:01 AM

Try removing the nVidia video card (graphics card) and connecting your monitor to the on board video card (HD 3000 built into your CPU). If the problems go away, then your video card may be the culprit (defect).


Edited by WhoX, 03 May 2015 - 07:05 AM.


#5 shadowk8

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 02:38 PM

Try removing the nVidia video card (graphics card) and connecting your monitor to the on board video card (HD 3000 built into your CPU). If the problems go away, then your video card may be the culprit (defect).

ya sadly i dont have onboard on this mb. Last night i used ddu and removed the old drivers and went back to the 347.88 ones again. I also cleared the cmo completely and noticed the cmos pins have had the jumper on them forever. I dont really short with the pins so nvr looked at them, usually i just power off the system and remove the battery. So i shorted with the pins and removed them completely, since the mb book says they should be off after shorting. Once i rebooted  i did get stuck in a boot loop on the bios splash screen. And had to cut the power and reboot it posted past the splash screen and had a cmo chksum error. In which i chose the default settings and reentered all my settings yada yada.

 

So now ive reinstalled drivers, looked over the mb and gfx card for burn marks or bad capacitors again, and cleared the cmo along with replacing its battery, etc....

 

Now all i can do is wait since it didnt flash today and the longest it hasnt flashed since this started was 2 days. Could a cmos jumper really all of a sudden cause this problem?


Edited by shadowk8, 03 May 2015 - 02:38 PM.


#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 09:56 PM

it could, actually, could have fried something on the board or inside the BIOS chip. You could try flashing the BIOS, or if you have a board with a backup BIOS switching to that.


picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#7 shadowk8

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 12:14 PM

Hmmm well today, I booted to have my mb just beep at me in succession about 5-6 times. And then reboot itself to tell me basically boot failure due to voltage fluctuations etc, the typical stuff when you overclock. That has happen to me every once in awhile, last week i know it did it, yesterday, and now today. Last time replacing the cmos battery seemed to fix it, which i did just in case yesterday. But neither the old(only a yr old) or new battery should be dying. Ill try the other new one since it was a two pack later, but idk maybe my psu is dying and cold boots are too much. On a positive note after this happened and got into windows i didnt have a black flash today, tomorrow would be a record 3 days lol.


Edited by shadowk8, 04 May 2015 - 12:15 PM.


#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 09:54 PM

could be power, could be the motherboard. I think, if you have an extra video card laying around, Id try swapping that out, as well as switching your memory sticks around and changing the CMOS battery like you said, and if you have another PSU laying around or that you could borrow swap that around to see if that solves the problem. Or if your comfortable working around live currents you can try the following method: 

 

[b]Reading PSU Rail Voltages[/b]

[color=red][b]Caution[/b][/color]: [b]Please read this before continuing[/b].


    Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock.

    There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.

    If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.


There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter.

The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test. They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.

There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.

For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multimeter]Wikipedia[/url].


Analog Multimeter

[URL=http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i35/carn3s/?action=view&current=analogedited.jpg]th_analogedited.jpg[/URL]


An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale.

The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one.

Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, [b]Black[/b] (negative), and [color=red][b]Red[/b][/color] (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative).

With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.

Digital Multimeter

[URL=http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i35/carn3s/?action=view&current=digitalmeteredited.jpg]th_digitalmeteredited.jpg[/URL]


The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials.

There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.

[b]Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC[/b]

There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.

The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.

Four pin Molex power connector

[URL=http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i35/carn3s/?action=view&current=250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg]th_250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg[/URL]


The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.

Five pin SATA power connector.

[URL=http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i35/carn3s/?action=view&current=sata-power-cable.jpg]th_sata-power-cable.jpg[/URL]

To read these voltages you will need to insert the [b]Black[/b] (-) probe into any of the black sockets, and insert the [color=red][b]Red[/b][/color] (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets. To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the back of the connector where the wires enter. Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side. Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading. To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.

[color=red][b]Caution[/b][/color]: It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings. This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.

To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking. Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures. For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary. I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling. Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU. If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.


Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V


picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 09:55 PM

only do the above though if your comfortable working around live currents. But always start with the cheaper items, and work your way up to the motherboard/PSU. With issues like that, my money is on one of them, but theres no sense in not being thorough and dotting your i's and crossing your Ts.


picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#10 shadowk8

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 10:23 PM

only do the above though if your comfortable working around live currents. But always start with the cheaper items, and work your way up to the motherboard/PSU. With issues like that, my money is on one of them, but theres no sense in not being thorough and dotting your i's and crossing your Ts.

Sadly i don't have a multimeter or i would, i do have a spare gfx card around somewhere ill try if it does the black flashing tomorrow. But honestly in my gut at this point i really dont think its the gfx card itself if anything the drivers. We all know there are a lot of signs of a failing gfx card and honestly I haven't gotten any of the big ones to make me think its dying. But ya i completely agree with what u are saying starting with the cheaper items, and double checking everything. If it keeps up im probably going to go grab a new psu first. I mean is that a legitimate possibility that cold boots might just be too much for it, but is stable after it warms up? 

 

Luckly tho my friends old comp has the exact same mb which hes not using anymore so im also going to snag that if this continues. But at this point im pretty sure its the psu slowly dying,pci-e slot dying, or some combination with drivers/windows. Or i messed up the bio chips by having that jumper on the cmos pins for 4 yrs  /faceplam


Edited by shadowk8, 04 May 2015 - 10:23 PM.





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