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Laptop Heating/Gaming


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#1 ghost whistler

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 01:47 PM

Hello, I recently brought a refurbished Sony Vaio laptop. I wasn't expecting it to be able to do much gaming and that's not really why i brought it, but I do enjoy the odd game, however it gets hot while doing so - naturally. I'm sure this quesiton has been asked a thousand times throughout the ages, but from what i've seen you can ask a thousand times and get a million different answers!

Now I'm not an expert on operating temperatures or laptop hardware. I brought a Belkin cooling pad (it was reasonably cheap) but I don't think it does much beside elevate it off the desktop. I'm getting temperatures, according to HWMonitor averaging in the mid 50's (degrees C) for normal use (browsing, music, video etc), which can increase as high as 71-72 depending on the game (Shogun 2 TW pushes it the most so far and is probably as advanced a game as i can reasonably run).

Is this safe? According to the info i've found on the SOny product forums the max operating temp is 105 degrees C, but I can't imagine running it at that speed regularly or for any length of time is healthy.

If those temperatures are not healthy then are there any reasonable solutions I can try. I'm not a tech wiz and I've no interest in tinkering with the insides (and voiding the warranty I have). It seems to me laptop cooling pads are more of a placebo than anything else as I've not come across anything with a rock solid reputation.

Thanks for reading. Apologies if this is in the wrong forum.



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#2 janethill

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 04:56 AM

Laptop heating while playing game is a common issue. You should use some external cooling system for your laptop.



#3 ghost whistler

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 05:00 AM

 

Laptop heating while playing game is a common issue. You should use some external cooling system for your laptop.

 

But are the temperatures i've mentioned problematic?

I don't know what solutions are available other than cooling pads, but they don't really do anything.

#4 reaper0117

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 11:01 AM

Being as it's a laptop their aren't many options for extra cooling. The cooling pad IMO is the best option out their. You should also get a can of compressed air and clear out the vents in the laptop for the fan. It's possible it may be obstructed a bit causing heat to build up more as circulation isn't at peak capacity.



#5 ghost whistler

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 02:37 PM

Cooling pads don't seem to have any effect other than to riase the machine off the table. What I'm trying to find out is whether or not the temperatures i mentioned are in the danger zone.

#6 reaper0117

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 11:58 AM

The cooling pads can reduce temperatures and raising the laptop also gives better cooling. The temps you are having seem normal for laptop use. As long as the computer isn't getting unbearably hot or random shutoffs you should be alright. Sadly as I said in the previous post their aren't many options for extra cooling for laptops and the pad is the best to my knowledge.



#7 IBelieveInGravity

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 03:46 AM

Care about the surface the pc is in standing on. Don't have anything around the pc that can reflect heat coming out. Care about room temperature which is a big factor and if you need it you can add external cooling.



#8 ghost whistler

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Posted 18 May 2015 - 06:06 AM

Of course. What is the best cooler available? Seems that such a device would need to put out a lot of very cold air to get through to the insides and cool them, otherwise you're just cooling the bottom of the machine.

#9 malynensi

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 05:57 PM

i wouldnt advise on cooling pads, its only a corrective measure



#10 ghost whistler

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 09:40 AM

How accurate are programmes like HWMonitor?

I've become obsessed with running this every time I game, which is pretty stupid really since it won't do anything if there is a problem. I suspect if I didn't know what the temperatures are when I run games (whether or not they areproblematic) then I wouldn't care since i've had no isses with shutting down etc.

 

But when I tab out of a game and see the temp has peaked at 70 odd degrees, it's already cooled by about ten degrees in a couple of seconds!



#11 LFos42

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 12:51 AM

70 degrees is not too hot for a CPU when gaming. the 105 degrees is the max junction temp (if that's what was listed) for that processor.  But remember, these degrees are in Celsius so it equates to a much bigger jump in Fahrenheight (since those of us in the US still think in those terms).  you should be fine with your processor running up to 90C (you can go higher but you want to be careful of a quick spike that puts it over the max when you start to get above that).

 

Thoughts on cooling:

 

A laptop cooling pad CAN help, especially if it has fans that blow air near where your fans are in your laptop.  the little stands that raise it off the desk/lap DO help, because most tests show that just taking the laptop off the desk and increasing the air gap even a few inches actually DOES help cooling, just a little bit of space really does increase airflow.  But, yes, gaming will heat up a laptop more that most other uses.

 

So when is your warranty voided? Refurbs usually only have about a month anyway.  I ask this because repasting (replacing the thermal paste) on the CPU and GPU will work far better than anything else, really. and you can hire a tech to do that if you don't want to. most companies don't use the best paste anyway, and a refurb probably hasn't been repasted since it was new, so it's all broken down and less effectice anyway.  blowing out the fans does help, but that is really best done with the case open, so all the dust (you'd be surprised how much is in there when you open it) won't just get blown further into the case.

 

You can also use fan control software, which wil let you set the fans to max when you start gaming, instead of the system waiting until the processor is flaming hot to try to cool it back down (most laptop companies want to show customers how quiet their system is, so the onboard software favors that over preemptive cooling).  this will help some.

 

And, some laptops just have better cooling than others. some companies just don't put in good cooling. also.. the thermal paste DOES break down over time, so if your laptop is a few years old from when it was made (refurb or no), you are probably due to have that done, and will see some pretty amazing results.

 

short of that, unfortunately, sitting near an air conditioner or a fan is probably your best bet. but if the laptop isn't getting the hot air out of the case, even that isn't enough.

 

this may not be the answer you wanted to hear, but hope it helps.  good luck.






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