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New computer scam


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#1 ironjack

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 09:22 PM

Not sure where to post so here...

It's new to me anyway.A group with India accents call an say the are from "Windows Tech Dept".Tell you that a secret security code alerted them that I am infected and that I need to get in front of my computer and follow their instructions.They will "help me".

After the caller would not answer any of my questions about who they were and how/why me. I told them to p#@ off and hung up.

Today they hit my 83 yr. old mother.They almost got her too. I came in as she had banking info in hand and had downloaded team viewer.I stopped the process.They called back four times.Four different techs trying to 
get me.A lady that I spoke too ended up telling me to "p$#s off". Very Microsoft like.The #1-952-991-8750 is where call originated.Bad #
Beware

 

any one else?


Edited by Queen-Evie, 16 April 2015 - 11:09 PM.
moved from Speak Easy


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#2 PhotoAce

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 11:24 PM

We've been getting something similar here in New Zealand for the last couple of years. Some people try to "scam the scammers", by seeing how long they can hold them on the phone.

 

My brother had a call from one, and when he accused her of being a scammer, she said no, she was a scam artist!



#3 Queen-Evie

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 12:01 AM

I have only gotten one of those calls, many years ago.

 

I was told that "Microsoft" had detected a virus on my computer.

 

Me: Really? That sounds bad. But please answer this question. How did Microsoft determine that the Mac has a virus?

 

The next sound I heard was nothing because the scammer hung up.

 

Yes, there was a Mac laptop that belonged to my daughter. It was turned off, closed and sitting on the table where my daughter had left it before she went to school that morning. 

 

Another time, my  elderly neighbor (early 90's) got a phone call for the same thing.  She had no idea what the man was talking about because she did not have a computer. To her, windows were simply house windows that had drapes over them and needed to be cleaned every once in a while.

 

I kind of wish I would get another one so I could play with them a bit.



#4 Angoid

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 02:48 AM

Yeah, I've been waiting for one of these calls .... I'd tell them I'm running Windows 9.6 (or some other non-existent version of Windows) and that there is an error in my Application Event Log saying, "Unable to connect scammer to computer - error code 80004005" (80004005 is a real error code and simply means 'Unspecified error') and do other wind-ups as I go along.

 

And yes, I'm just longing to write "click" on the desktop..... :)


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#5 quietman7

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 04:49 AM

Unsolicited phone calls (aka Tech Support Scamming) from "so-called Support Techs" advising your computer is infected with malware has become an increasing common and prolific scam tactic over the past several years. In the majority of these cases the caller lies by claiming to be an employee affiliated with Microsoft or Windows Support. However, there have been reports of callers claiming to be affiliated with major computer manufacturers such as Hewlett Packard, Lenovo and Dell or familiar security vendors like Symantec and McAfee. Typically, the scammers attempt to trick their victims into believing that their computer is infected, often by having them look at a Windows log that shows dozens of harmless or low-level error entries. The scammer instructs their victim to type "eventvwr" in the RUN box to open Windows Event Viewer and then scares them by pointing out all the warnings and error messages listed under the various Event Viewer categories. In other cases the caller pretends to provide free security checks or direct the download and use of a bogus registry cleaner which purports to find thousands of problems.

img_52e1a9d429e36.jpg
.The scammer then attempts to talk (scare) their victims into giving them remote access to the computer in order to fix it and/or remove malware. If the victim agrees, the support usually costs hundreds of dollars and often leaves the victim's computer unchanged or intentionally infected with malware/ransomware. More nefarious scammers will install a backdoor Trojan or Remote Access Trojan in order to steal passwords and other sensitive personal information which could then be used to access bank accounts or steal a person's identity. Not answering any questions and hanging up the telephone is the best way to deal with phone scammers.

About Tech Support Phone Scamming::Phone Scamming from Bogus Microsoft Techs:
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#6 Sintharius

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:02 AM

Some people recommend messing with scammers by playing stupid or using VMs, but that's only for people that know what they're doing.

By the way quietman7, you mixed up the links that lead to Malwarebytes and Emsisoft's tech support scam articles.

#7 Angoid

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:10 AM

My previous post was intended in jest - seriously, 'write "click" on the desktop'.  Say that out aloud and you'll know what I mean.

 

On a slightly more serious note, why would Microsoft (as in the legitimate company) call you to say that your computer is infected?  Imagine if they did this for all their customers .... there wouldn't be enough personnel or time to do it effectively.

 

These guys seem to know what they're talking about when it comes to scamming users, but their technical knowledge is usually seriously lacking.

 

As for the event viewer (application event viewer log), we refer to that all the time at work to diagnose errors, and lots of errors are written there that have no operational impact whatsoever.  By telling you that these are serious, a scammer could convince you that you really do need their "help".


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#8 quietman7

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:12 AM

Some people recommend messing with scammers by playing stupid or using VMs...

I don't know anyone recommending to do that and if so, they should not be, especially those who are tech savvy. What they do is one thing but it is poor advice to be giving to others.
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#9 cmptrgy

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:29 AM

ironjack I am glad you were able to help your 83 year old mother.

I have had 4 friends affected by scammers over the last few years. One time when I stopped in to visit a relative he was talking to a scammer and asked me to talk with that person." So I said thank you for letting him know his computer has problems, infections or whatever so we'll take the computer to our local computer shop immediately especially since the owner is a friend of mine. Then I hung up.



#10 Sintharius

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:25 AM

I don't know anyone recommending to do that and if so, they should not be, especially those who are tech savvy. What they do is one thing but it is poor advice to be giving to others.

I see those a lot in comments talking about tech support scams, quietman7. I agree that it's not good advice.

#11 codyrt

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:45 AM

My grandmother frequently gets these calls. I have instructed her that absolutely no legitimate company will contact you for technical support without you calling them first. The reason why they're able to reach out to older folks is because several phonebook listings online display names and age ranges of residents just by looking up phone numbers. This allows scam companies to easily narrow down their call list to numbers that were known to have someone over a certain age living there.

 

When she gets a call from them, she answers by whispering "It's done, there's blood everywhere but it's done." and then hangs up. Or if she has some time to kill, she'll keep them on the phone as long as possible and then tell them to F@@@ off.



#12 Bradley8

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 09:42 AM

One should not underestimate how persuasive these crooks can be when they contact the elderly and vulnerable people that they clearly target. A relative of mine only came to their senses and ended the call with credit card in hand, despite having been specifically warned about this type is scam 'phone call. Ended up re-installing Windows to rid the machine of rubbish put there under remote access.

What sort of person makes a living from tricking eldely people out of their money? The lowest of the low in my opinion. Therefore whenever I get a call from theses crims I will do everything possible to waste their time - had some bloke hold on for nearly fifteen minutes while I "fetched the laptop from the other room", another spent ages telling me what to type and couldn't understand why I had a blank screen until I finally asked him if I should switch the computer on...  These fraudsters apparently make huge amounts of money from their activities, hiding behind anonymous overseas 'phone numbers, causing them as much delay and frustration as possible is at least some form of retaliation, however small.



#13 White Hat Mike

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 11:03 AM

I wrote a full report on a social engineering incident involving this scam.  Pretty sad to see someone fall for such a blatant scam but it happens; they generally use LogMeIn/LogMeIn Rescue or Team Viewer to gain remote access to your device, then they open up Event Viewer and filter to show errors/alerts.  Then they claim that these "errors" require software to be purchased, downloaded and installed to remediate the issues.


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#14 quietman7

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 11:24 AM

It has been proven time and again that the user is a more substantial factor (weakest link) in security. Social engineering takes advantage of that.
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#15 cmptrgy

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 11:24 AM

@White Hat Mike: so true. One time last year I cleaned up a seriously infected and poorly maintained laptop computer and had the computer running like new and the owner was happy. However about a week later she got a call from a scammer who did just what you mentioned and of course she had no concept of why errors needed to be taken care of. She waited about a week before she called me to inform of that. She signed up with their plan to maintain her computer. Well that was easy for me to address: I opened event viewer and showed her how there were still plenty of errors. Then about 6 months later she called back  and told me her computer was running like crap and asked me to get her computer back to working like new again. Fortunately she agreed she'll never even listen to anyone who calls to fix her computer.






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