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Questions about backing up


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#1 ZefsideZol

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 03:10 PM

Hello,

 

I am having some generally, non obtrusive issues with my computer, and knowing what I know from working in Tech support for another OS, I think it might be best to perform a full reimage/reinstall of the OS.

 

Reading the materials I have from my PC manufacturer, my D drive was creating to hold the backup of my computer and also, to my understanding, the OS.  I am very familiar with gathering log files for operating systems, yet I do not at this time want to provide any. I don't know if the log files gather any personally identifiable information inside so I will reply with log files that are requested by an esteemed member of these forums. If there is anyone interested in helping me out, here's my problem.

 

 

I used my D drive for extra space.  I've used it for music and things like that but generally, everything is in just one file and the other files inside appear to be configurative files for the backup/restore process.

 

I've had this laptop for 3 years and I don't know if, when I got it, I basically said "No thanks" to having to backup/restore and so I may have manipulated files for the backup/restore process.

 

The reason I feel this way is because my backup using the 'Backup and Restore' feature in the control panel always fails.  IT says this:

"windows backup failed while trying to read from the shadow copy on one of the volumes being backed up. Please check in the event logs for any relevant errors."

 

 

 

 

 

Because it fails, I definitely don't want to reinstall my OS or even perform a wipe on the computer.

 

 

 

Here are the basics about my system from MSinfo32:

 

 

System Information report written at: 04/13/15 14:22:18
System Name: xxx (omitted)
[System Summary]

Item    Value    
OS Name    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium    
Version    6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601    
Other OS Description     Not Available    
OS Manufacturer    Microsoft Corporation    
System Name    xxx
System Manufacturer    ASUSTeK Computer Inc.    
System Model    K54C    
System Type    x64-based PC    
Processor    Intel® Pentium® CPU B960 @ 2.20GHz, 2200 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 2 Logical Processor(s)    
BIOS Version/Date    American Megatrends Inc. K54C.207, 4/18/2012    
SMBIOS Version    2.6    
Windows Directory    C:\Windows    
System Directory    C:\Windows\system32    
Boot Device    \Device\HarddiskVolume2    
Locale    United States    
Hardware Abstraction Layer    Version = "6.1.7601.17514"    
User Name    xxx
Time Zone    Eastern Daylight Time    
Installed Physical Memory (RAM)    6.00 GB    
Total Physical Memory    5.91 GB    
Available Physical Memory    3.70 GB    
Total Virtual Memory    11.8 GB    
Available Virtual Memory    8.92 GB    
Page File Space    5.91 GB    
Page File    C:\pagefile.sys  

 

 

I really don't know where to begin here.

 

To simplify, all I'm trying to do is wipe my computer.  If possible I'd like to reinstall the OS.  My computer did not come with any OS discs.  I do not want to just go about this on my own, that is how things get broken.  I've already saved a copy of my most important files.

 

 

 

 



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#2 dudeage

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 03:44 PM

Sounds like your OEM may have partitioned your drive a certain way, but it's tough to know for sure unless you provide us with a screenshot of your Computer menu window. 

 

Log files don't identify any of your personal information - for example they won't show your login name or password or even your IP Address.  No one will be able to do anything to your system because of your log files, so don't worry about that. 

 

Log files are only able to provide information about your computer, not the user itself - it's the latter that would cause problems for you, not the former.  Make sense? 

 

However, all of this is moot if you don't have any OS disks.  Is your system still under warranty with ASUS?  If so, you might be able to get some OS disks for free. 

 

Otherwise, you'll either have to shop around for the best deal on a copy of Windows or switch to Linux because it's free. 



#3 ZefsideZol

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 03:55 PM

Okay, what if I'm not looking to completely reinstall the OS?  I'm fairly sure the laptop did not come with any OS discs, but I can look around.

 

I'm reading about holding F9 during startup to factory reset an Asus laptop.  Does that sound like an option that would factory reset this laptop?



#4 ZefsideZol

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 04:07 PM

Here are some pictures with reasons why I'd like to perform a factory reset.  Please tell me if this will achieve my goals.

 

 

Image 1:  My Drives.  You'll see the C drive, D drive, and F Drive.  At one time, I used the windows Disk Management to create an F drive but I don't remember why.  I'd like the space to be reallocated to the C drive but I can't seem to do that.

 

Attached File  img1.jpg   25.93KB   0 downloads

 

 

Image 2: The files inside of my D drive which seemed to be for backups.

 

Attached File  image2.jpg   106.66KB   0 downloads

 

 

Image 3:  The drives in Disk Management.

 

Attached File  image3.jpg   111.32KB   0 downloads

 

 



#5 dudeage

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 01:28 PM

Okay, what if I'm not looking to completely reinstall the OS?  I'm fairly sure the laptop did not come with any OS discs, but I can look around.

 

I'm reading about holding F9 during startup to factory reset an Asus laptop.  Does that sound like an option that would factory reset this laptop?

 

It sounds to me like you might be confused a little.  A factory reset puts your computer to the way it was when it was shipped to you brand new. 

 

This process will essentially put the state of your computer back in time to the point when it first came out of the factory. 

 

A computer that was newly built by an OEM will have a fresh install of Windows started the minute it's built - just like if you were building your own computer at home. 

 

Essentially, a factory reset is almost the same thing as reinstalling the OS - except it saves you a few steps.  Drivers won't have to be installed, although this can be a problem as drivers will go back to the date they were whenever your PC was made - so if you have drivers with tons of updates then it's going to cause problems with your system at least to start. 

 

Then there's the question of you'll have to uninstall all the garbage software you don't need anymore.  I've owned Dells before and Dell at one time was notorious for garbage SW on factory PCs that a lot of customers ended up just uninstalling.  Asus may or may not do that, I don't know as I've never owned an Asus. 

 

It also saves you from some of the small config steps if you had to do it manually. 

 

However, and I can't stress this enough - you would still have to backup your data as it will still erase all your data on your hard drive. 

 

So, in short chances are it will save time so if you have that option it's good, but bear in mind it could also blow up in your face if you've had driver issues in the past or had to uninstall lots of SW when the PC came to you.  In the end it's up to you. 



#6 dudeage

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 01:34 PM

Here are some pictures with reasons why I'd like to perform a factory reset.  Please tell me if this will achieve my goals.

 

 

Image 1:  My Drives.  You'll see the C drive, D drive, and F Drive.  At one time, I used the windows Disk Management to create an F drive but I don't remember why.  I'd like the space to be reallocated to the C drive but I can't seem to do that.

 

attachicon.gifimg1.jpg

 

 

Image 2: The files inside of my D drive which seemed to be for backups.

 

attachicon.gifimage2.jpg

 

 

Image 3:  The drives in Disk Management.

 

attachicon.gifimage3.jpg

 

 

 

Have you actually checked to see what's on that F partition?  I'd do that before deleting the partition. 

 

Ultimately, it's not that hard to do and can be done straight from within Disk Management within Windows, and moving the stuff over to C if that's what you choose to do shouldn't be too hard either unless you've encrypted or password protected everything there. 

 

As for what's on the D drive?  Asus hasn't labeled it very well so it's impossible to tell whether it's the image of the factory reset or what that is.  Most OEMs call it a "Recovery Partition."  Talk to Asus, they'd know better than anyone what that is. 

 

In future I'd suggest you forgo creating new partitions on your hard drive because it sounds like that's an organizational system that doesn't work for you and just confuses you.  Might be better off putting any special data on a 2nd SATA drive or external USB drive or flash drive. 



#7 dudeage

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 01:40 PM

But in short, yes if it's possible a factory reset would resolve your issue from what you've said about them - you haven't got into great specifics but at the very least it won't harm your system. 



#8 cmptrgy

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 02:41 PM

ASUSTeK K54C

Determine your 25-character product ID

Back up your data

Gather up you applications disc(s) such as your office program

Create a System Repair Disc

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2083-system-repair-disc-create.html?ltr=S

If this is your PC, Go to page A13 if you want to use the Recovery Partition

http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/nb/K54C/E6591_eManual_K54L_K54LY_Z106.pdf

 

If you decide to do a factory reset, uninstall bloat ware as soon as possible

Install an AV as soon as possible

Set Windows Updates not to be done all at once automatically

--- I install them myself without doing them all at once

--- I’ve seen too many failed installs in my experience

Before installing any applications, create a pristine system image backup

After completing the Windows Updates and installing applications create another system image backup






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