Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How to back up my computer correctly?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 JimmyKarter

JimmyKarter

  • Members
  • 127 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:35 PM

Posted 12 April 2015 - 02:03 PM

So I've had a few computer problems recently and I'm wondering how I can best back up my computer. As in, suppose tomorrow my hdd melts, how do I best back up my computer?

I've tried using the windows 8-given backup programs, but I don't think they do the entire job.

Or, perhaps, if I wanted to reinstall windows and all my files so that it would be like new, but with all my files and settings, or whatever.

There are a lot of ways I know I can back things up but I'm not sure how to do which.


Edited by Budapest, 12 April 2015 - 03:28 PM.
Moved from Win8 ~Budapest


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Scoop8

Scoop8

  • Members
  • 326 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Local time:02:35 PM

Posted 13 April 2015 - 06:33 PM

Here's a couple of thread links at this forum that may help with explaining backups and the various plans and options for which software tools to choose for your particular requirements.  Note post #3 in this thread from member quietman7 which provides additional information and various links to backup software tool sites.

 

Suggestions about Backup

 

 

This thread title references Dell PC's but it contains some information that may help define HDD backups.

 

clarification about dell backup/recovery software and an alternative

 

 

I use a two-fold backup approach with my 2 Win 7x64 PC's.

 

- Scheduled or periodic Full HDD Backups.  This provides a fast way to restore the PC from a number of situations: malware, user errors, bad Windows Updates,  failed HDD.

 

- Scheduled Specific-item backups.  I use this to backup my "can't lose" items, like my Outlook e-mail data file, certain files or folders, etc.

 

My 2¢ on general backup plans:

 

- Redundancy

 

  - Multiple full-HDD backup paths.  They're a great "peace of mind" resource to have if unforeseen issues arise where restoring a complete HDD is required.

 

  - Multiple personal data backups, those items which are irreplaceable.

 

- Air-gapped backups

 

Have copies on storage devices that are connected to the parent PC only when a backup process is running.  This provides a recovery path in the event that encryption/ransomware incidences are encountered. 



#3 JimmyKarter

JimmyKarter
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 127 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:35 PM

Posted 14 April 2015 - 09:46 PM

Thanks a lot!



#4 Scoop8

Scoop8

  • Members
  • 326 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Local time:02:35 PM

Posted 15 April 2015 - 07:27 AM

oh5x53.jpg



#5 Rocky Bennett

Rocky Bennett

  • Members
  • 2,822 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico, USA
  • Local time:01:35 PM

Posted 16 April 2015 - 11:01 AM

I need to back up my computer. There is still a lot that I need to learn.

594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#6 Scoop8

Scoop8

  • Members
  • 326 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Local time:02:35 PM

Posted 16 April 2015 - 04:12 PM

↑ There's a lot of help available at the forum on this topic from members that know a lot more than I do about this stuff :).  Let someone know if you have questions.

 

Once you get familiar with the terminology and a few "do's and don't's", you'll find that HDD backups are usually fast and the process is reliable.

 

I've had 2 Cloning failures out of about 100 with 3 PC's.  Those 2 failures were interesting :), since I've identified the reason for the 2 failures but not the cause.

 

I've not yet encountered a failed Image-restoration process although I Clone more frequently than Image on my PC's.

 

 

JimmyKarter,

 

I forgot to mention something earlier about full-HDD backups:

 

I'd recommend verifying your HDD backup activity once you've decided on your methods.

 

For example, here's what I did when I decided on my HDD backup tools/software.

 

I did a complete HDD backup/restore, simulating a "worse-case" scenario where I didn't have a working OS or perhaps my OS HDD failed unexpectedly. 

 

Imaging: After I created my bootable/rescue media, I used a spare unallocated HDD and booted up on the media and did a "restore" using one of my stored full-HDD Images from my external USB storage HDD.

 

Cloning: I did the same thing, started with a blank HDD, booted up on the media and Cloned to it from my good OS HDD. 

 

That tests the bootup and loading the software tool into RAM.  Then I restarted the PC, booting into the newly-Cloned HDD or the Image-restored HDD to verify normal Windows operation.

 

Once you verify the complete bare-metal HDD recovery methodology, you'll be confident that you've tested your HDD-recovery path.



#7 brainout

brainout

  • Members
  • 1,190 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston
  • Local time:01:35 PM

Posted 27 June 2015 - 12:56 PM

CLONE CLONE CLONE.  That's first.  Problem is, if your machine has a glitch which happens just afterwards, sometimes the clone will have the same glitch.  So backup is important, too.  Same problem, though.  So for any important file, I just copy it severally as soon as done with it.

 

You can always clone a backup.  You can always clone a clone.  Yeah they should be staggered.  But the clone is a live copy, doesn't have to be restored, but if your drive tanks you can just clone back using Knoppix or Clonezilla or Macrium or Easeus.  Backups are proprietary to the program that created them, and one of my longtime complaints about Macrium is that if its own program on the hard drive is corrupted, I'm 'sol'.  So now I'm abandoning the PE environment, still using them for backup as I too have now, in addition to my Pro licenses, the Free version -- but is it patched like the Pro versions?  I don't know.  This last time Macrium kept on failing to clone yet imaged okay, and I had to use EaseUS to get the clone Macrium wrecked when it failed, working again. I don't know why, the problem started when they were revising their code for Windows 8.1.  So I don't do backups or cloning anymore on the other machines, while online.  I don't want their updates.

 

In short, you not only need multiple backups and clones, but you need multiple backup and clone tools, as the tools themselves may fail.

 

Never can be too thin, too rich, or have too many backups/clones. :)


(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users