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Cinnamon desktop


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#1 Al1000

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 08:33 PM

The last time I used Cinnamon desktop was around a year ago when Mint 16 was the latest version. That was only the second Linux distro I had ever installed, with Ubuntu 12.04 being the first, and I don't recall exploring Cinnamon too deeply back then, I just basically installed it and used it in its default configuration. So I decided to explore it further, and installed Mint 17.1 Cinnamon the other day.

After installation I updated it, enabled the firewall, installed the recommended Nvidia driver and conky-all, and everything went just fine.

mint_desktop_zpsolbdaq9z.png

Then I set about seeing what I could do to configure it. The first thing I tried was creating an extra panel at the top of the screen to put icons in for the applications I use the most often, like I have on KDE and LXDE desktops on Kubuntu and LXLE respectively, but the options are very limited in Cinnamon. It seems that unlike with KDE and LXDE, you can't just create an empty panel wherever you want. The only options I found were to either 1) have the default panel at the foot of the screen, 2) move the default panel to the top of the screen, or 3) select "panel at top and bottom" which creates an empty panel at the foot of the screen, with the default panel at the top.

Whereas what I wanted was the empty panel at the top of the screen, and the default panel at the foot. I thought about moving everything from the panel at the top to the panel at the bottom, but that seems like a lot of hassle for the amount of time I'm likely to be using this operating system. Is there any way to easily create an empty panel at the top of the screen on Cinnamon?

I enabled a hot corner, and switching between workspaces and selecting them from the background etc, all works fast and smoothly, but KDE does all that as well. Cinnamon only uses around two thirds as much RAM as KDE, which is impressive, but it seems nowhere near as configurable and doesn't have nearly as much in the way of desktop effects or applications. Overall, it's very bland in comparison to KDE. It seems very similar to MATE, just slightly more polished. That's not to take anything away from MATE, as it's supposed to be basic; but as Cinnamon is Mint's "flagship" desktop, I was expecting more.

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#2 paul88ks

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 11:33 PM

Hey AI1000= can you clear something up for me? Are KDE and LXDE desktop environments? And if so are they available on Mint? I have Mate installed,but like the "look" of some things better on Cinnamon! I am a little confused- do they come on specific distros of Linux? 



#3 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 01:35 AM

@paul88ks

 

A Window manager is what makes the program windows, and desktop background appear on your screen. Some also include the ability to have panels, and right-click menus. A desktop-environment is just a window-manager paired with additional software; panels/docks being common, usually a file-manager, a system-settings area, a desktop-manager (login screen) and other such things.

Are KDE and LXDE desktop environments?


do they come on specific distros of Linux?


KDE, LXDE, XFCE, Mate Desktop, Cinnamon, Unity, Gnome, and EDE are all different desktop environments available for Linux. While some desktop-environments are built for a specific distro (Ex: Unity is a fork of Gnome 3 for Ubuntu), others are just built in for Linux in general. You will install desktop-environments the same way you install other software on the distro you use.

Some distros don't include a desktop environment. They may just use the terminal interface (Ex: Ubuntu Server), or they may provide a window-manager (Ex: Puppy Linux); some window-managers being: OpenBox, iceWM, Enlightenment, Mutter, JWM, Fluxbox, and Awesome.

For distros that do provide a desktop environment there are a few different approaches:
1. Comes with a desktop-environment pre-installed, but also offers derivative operating systems with other desktop environments (Ex: Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Gnome, Ubuntu Mate).
2. Comes with a desktop-environment, but several different discs are offered so that you can get one with the desktop environment you want (Ex: Porteus).
3. Comes with packages for several different desktop environments, and while one may be the distro's default you can choose which to install (Ex: Mageia).

are they available on Mint? I have Mate installed,but like the "look" of some things better on Cinnamon!


In general you can install multiple desktop-environments on the same OS, but there are some execeptions where issues can arise. I do not have Linux Mint - Mate, but I presume you can install Cinnamon on it.

 

@AI1000

 


the options are very limited in Cinnamon

 

Yup.



#4 NickAu

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 02:26 AM

 

Are KDE and LXDE desktop environments? And if so are they available on Mint?

To install KDE in Ubuntu/Linux Mint open Terminal and copy the following commands.


1. KDE standard

it contains KDE plasma desktop and standard set of applications such as Kate (default editor, like gedit), Konqueror (default web browser), Kget (Download Manager), KMail (email client), Dolphin (File Manager), Konsole (terminal) etc. To install standard package of kde, open a terminal and execute the command –

Install KDE-Standard
$ sudo apt-get install kde-standard
2. KDE Desktop Minimal

If you just want to give it a try or may be you don’t want the applications to be installed by default (you can always install later), then prefer this minimal package – that installs KDE plasma desktop with minimal set of apps.

Install KDE-plasma
$ sudo apt-get install kde-plasma-desktop
3. KDE Netbook Minimal

As the name suggest, it’s more suitable for netbook users.

Install KDE-netbook
$ sudo apt-get install kde-plasma-netbook
4. KDE Full

If you want the complete package of apps, along with the core desktop environment (KDE Plasma), then it’s the best option for you (but it may take more time to install depending on your internet speed).

Install KDE-full
$ sudo apt-get install kde-full

Edited by NickAu, 12 April 2015 - 02:29 AM.

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#5 Al1000

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 10:17 AM

Hey AI1000= can you clear something up for me? Are KDE and LXDE desktop environments? And if so are they available on Mint? I have Mate installed,but like the "look" of some things better on Cinnamon! I am a little confused- do they come on specific distros of Linux?

As hollowface and Nick were saying, you can install a range of desktops to a range of operating systems; and even install multiple desktops to the same operating system, which means you get a menu to choose which desktop you want to log into at the log-in screen.

Desktops aren't small downloads though, particularly if you install the full package with all the software. Installing full packages also means you end up with multiple applications that do the same thing. For example if you installed the full KDE package to Mint MATE, you would end up with Dolphin file manager as well as whatever file manager Mint MATE comes with. You would be able to use both file managers from either desktop, but if you logged into the MATE desktop for example, you would have to either start Dolphin from the terminal or create a menu entry or icon for it if you wanted to use it, and vice versa if you logged into KDE and wanted to use whatever file manager MATE comes with.

As for which desktops come already installed in which distributions, there is a version of Mint that comes with KDE, Mint 17.1 KDE being the latest, but no version of Mint that comes with LXDE.

AFAIK, Lubuntu is the most popular distro that comes with the LXDE desktop, and Kubuntu is the most popular distro that comes with KDE. They're both based on Ubuntu and have been around for some time, whereas KDE on Mint is relatively new.

Edited by Al1000, 12 April 2015 - 10:21 AM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 03:38 PM

Linux Mint ships with MATE (the main edition I've ran for years), Cinnamon, XFCE, KDE & Debian. 

 

The Cinnamon desktop is OK, though overrated. If one wants the best graphical experience (the most appealing) then KDE has them all beat. 

 

While Mint 17.1 XFCE & MATE will run on most any capable computer (native PAE), Cinnamon will vary on different hardware, this can be seen by one who has 2-3 computers to work with. The experience won't be the same on each. One needs a little extra CPU, RAM & the newer & more powerful the graphics, the better. On an old computer with Intel GMA graphics, it's not that appealing, though one may be able to see everything OK. 

 

It's best at a minimum, to have a graphics card that supports the Aero graphics that ships with Windows 7/Vista. This may be why the Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop is often referred to as the best 'drop in' replacement for Windows 7. 

 

Cinnamon can also be added to Ubuntu, if desired. Possibly some other Ubuntu based distros as well, though the only articles I've read applies to Ubuntu. 

 

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/11/install-cinnamon-2-4-ubuntu-14-04-lts

 

 

 

Desktops aren't small downloads though, particularly if you install the full package with all the software.

 

I agree, it's more like an upgrade, if one is running Linux Mint MATE & wants Cinnamon, it's best to download the ISO & clean install the root partition. One can keep their /home & Swap as is, just assign /home, and be sure to uncheck the box to format it. This preserves all of ones documents, virtual machines, whatever. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 April 2015 - 03:38 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Al1000

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 03:57 PM

It's best at a minimum, to have a graphics card that supports the Aero graphics that ships with Windows 7/Vista


I've never heard of Aero graphics before now, but I've had a look on the internet and as far as I can tell my 8 year old Gainward Nvidia 8600GT 256MB graphic card does support them.

#8 cat1092

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 04:14 PM

It's really not called an Aero graphics card, rather one that supports the Aero glass like theme of the premium editions of Vista & Windows 7. This isn't exactly the same card, but based on the NVIDIA 8600GT, you'll see in the overview what I'm speaking of. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150229

 

Judging by the ratings, a popular card for it's day & should support Cinnamon. I'm going to give Mint 17.1 Cinnamon another shot when my new card comes in, should be here later in the week. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127842&cm_re=msi_gtx_960-_-14-127-842-_-Product

 

If that won't run Cinnamon, I'm waving the white flag. :P

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 Al1000

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 05:09 PM

This isn't exactly the same card, but based on the NVIDIA 8600GT, you'll see in the overview what I'm speaking of.

That sounds much like mine, except mine has a large heat sink instead of a fan. (I have two case fans blowing onto the heat sink)

Judging by the ratings, a popular card for it's day & should support Cinnamon.

My philosophy is to buy hardware that's relatively high spec at the time, so that it will still be useful in years to come. The most graphically intensive application I run on my computer is an online multi-player game called War Thunder that's installed on XP, although I haven't actually played it at all this year. A mate of mine who also sometimes plays it gets well over 100 frames per second on his much more modern computer, while I only get around 30 on mine, but that's still plenty fast enough for the human eye.

I'm going to give Mint 17.1 Cinnamon another shot when my new card comes in, should be here later in the week.

That looks nice. I reckon I'll wait until either the CPU, MB or graphics card on my computer breaks, then replace the lot and buy some more modern RAM too.

#10 shadow-warrior

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 05:18 PM

It's always worth bearing in mind on whether you will be installing a GTK based DE  (Gnome) onto a OS which is QT based (KDE)..thogh not as predominate as it was it can cause conflicts and also increase Ram / CPU usage

 

If you install KDE apps on Gnome you get a huge list of dependencies which all need to get fired up when you start the app...

 

you may find some themes  or fonts don't look right ...



#11 cat1092

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 11:32 PM

 

 

My philosophy is to buy hardware that's relatively high spec at the time, so that it will still be useful in years to come.

 

That's mine also, which is why I stuffed the PC to the gills with RAM & getting this latest video card. The description or Overview states that the card is for today & the future. 

 

 

 

The MSI GeForce GTX 960 also supports two-way SLI configuration. It is a video card for today and tomorrow.

 

Which is what I was looking for, even with the first one. That last card was a compromise one, very much so, because between Dell & NVIDIA, they were pointing fingers at one another, rather than solving issues. So while I purchased the card that I now have on the cheap, knew if wasn't going to be long term, yet also realized that I could recycle it on another computer later. 

 

It took a few months & many customers returning nice Dell XPS 8700 PC's, some costing in the $1,600-1,800 range, for Dell to get off of their butts. NVIDIA had already improved drivers, Dell needed a new BIOS release & it finally came late last year in A10. It was the only out of three BIOS upgrades I accepted. My main question will always be why didn't they fix this with the 2nd BIOS update, rather than the last? Because the issue was there at the time. It took tens of thousands of returned computers to get this right.....why one can get a discounted 'open box' model on some sites, yet to save $50, why bother? Most of those costs more than mine did brand new. 

 

I'm just happy that the GTX 960 was finally added to the 'official' list of supported cards, some has reported that even the OC-based cards runs fine, yet they're bulky & my case is a mid-sized one. Used to be, Dell XPS PC's came with a huge case, not today. Was kind of surprised that it wasn't too much larger than the one it displaced, a Dell Dimension 2400. 

 

Yet by far it's more powerful & energy efficient. 

 

The Cinnamon desktop should run with ease with that card, providing the best experience possible. Whether or not I keep the version is a whole other issue altogether. I've became accustomed to the mainstream Linux Mint environment for years, it wasn't called MATE at first, just the main edition. The MATE renaming came after the Unity controversy in 2010, many wanted Gnome 2 back, rather than Unity (or Gnome 3) & from that, the lead Mint devs used Gnome 2 to come up with the MATE desktop. For me, it works just was the former main version did, so I seen no change. 

 

As I recall, it was another year or so before Cinnamon was released, and MInt 13 offered the first LTS version of the DE. Cinnamon is a Mint exclusive & has been evolving over the years, so while there may be no major release of MInt until the next LTS, a major (or minor) Cinnamon update could be pushed at any time through the updating system. Though in Mint tradition, major releases are generally handled by offering a new ISO & I suspect any major changes to the DE will result in a new one, though in the end, it's up to the user to upgrade or clean install. Clean install of root while keeping the /home partition intact will work for many, no loss of data. 

 

I really want to see if the hype behind Cinnamon is a huge step forward from MATE, or smoke & mirrors, and by that, I mean other than a reworked Start Menu & Panel, which looks nice, yet in itself means nothing. Being that it's touted as a 'drop in' Windows 7 replacement, am expecting to see some of the same features added. Like an Aero or glass type display. Something that clearly separates it from MATE, as KDE does. Compiz is offered in MATE, so that's no step forward. It really has to be a compelling additional feature for me to make a switch, and it will have the chance to show me the 'why' I should move to Cinnamon or stick with MATE. 

 

Will run it for a month or so & see.  :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 April 2015 - 11:33 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 paul88ks

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 11:27 PM

OK- I know you guys know all of this stuff backwards and forwards but I am going to have to write down ALL of these acronyms and look them up to know what you guys are talking about! Every time i ask about one Linux OS and Desktop environment it seems another distro of linux pops up! Not to worry- I will do my due diligence and educate myself- also - I have watched a couple of videos about  Linux Mate,and I want to know how that is pronounced- i have heard it spoken as Maa-tay - which sounds a little hoity-toity, or Mate- with a long A sound. Which is correct? or is it a question of tomato vs. tomatoe ? Saying that either one is acceptable.

 

Anyway- I bought a stack of DVD's and am currently downloading  Mint KDE. I will also download the others and run them all in LIVE mode until I find the right one for me.

 

I have already decided on Linux Studio for my professional needs and am currently still searching for the best "fit" for me! Thanks Guys!



#13 NickAu

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 11:39 PM

I have no idea Paul I am still struggling with,  Quantal Quetzal and Breezy Badger.

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#14 cat1092

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 12:53 AM

 

 

I have already decided on Linux Studio for my professional needs and am currently still searching for the best "fit" for me! Thanks Guys!

 

Paul, if your computer shipped with Windows 7, maybe you should try Linux Mint Cinnamon, it's considered a 'drop in' replacement for the OS. :thumbup2:

 

Hint: The OP's discussion is about Cinnamon. :)

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 paul88ks

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 01:12 AM

yes - i should stay on topic- sorry- I do have "Cinnamon" on a DVD, and have booted it "LIVE". I do find it a little more attractive in appearance than MATE.I guess I am just wondering if it is the same OS underneath,and, as i have been reading on the Mint home page,that this is true,with XFCE and KDE just being different GUI's. Is that correct?






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