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Windows 8.1 Recovery USB Drive


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#1 leonicholson

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 10:10 AM

First, GREAT SITE.  Thanks for this excellent resource!

 

Installed Windows 8 Pro from a DVD and upgraded to 8.1.  ( And...... Classic Shell is outstanding! )

 

Created a custom refresh image.

 

Created Recovery USB drive.  The "Copy the recovery partition from the PC" is grayed out, as I have no OEM partition.

 

Should I copy the custom refresh image to another USB in case of system problems, or can I create a recovery partition for inclusion onto the Recovery USB drive?

 

I'm a long time Windows 7 user and previously have had an OEM recovery partition. 



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#2 dicke

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 12:48 PM

[personal opinion]

I'd have a CD/DVD imaged disk as my go to when it becomes necessary to do a reformat and reinstall of everything. USB drives are great for short term storage but I'm still old school enough to want a 'permanent' copy for when "it" happens.

 

Dick


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#3 dc3

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:12 PM

 USB drives are great for short term storage but I'm still old school enough to want a 'permanent' copy for when "it" happens.

 

Dick

Dick,

 

Solid State Drives use the same technology as a flash drive. :whistle:


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 dicke

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:25 PM

dc3,

Currently I think of SSDs in much the same way as any other 'temporary' storage media. For the longer term, where there should be fewer possibilities of loss, corruption or destruction, I still like CDs and DVDs. Hard copies used to be the way to go but the volume of data is just too great now and code in hard copy isn't too useful.

 

Dick


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#5 dc3

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:31 PM

You may as well add SSDs to your list of internal storage devices, they're here to stay.

 

I just install Windows 8.1 on my new SSD, I trust it enough to save six years of tutorials I've written.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 leonicholson

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 03:18 PM

But.....

 

Should I copy the custom refresh image to another USB in case of system problems, or can I somehow create a recovery partition for inclusion onto the Recovery USB drive?

 

I hated Windows 8 when it first came out.  Bought Pro at the time for a few dollars, but put it away until this week.  Decided to have another go using the 8.1 upgrade.  Also loaded Classic Shell, and it is as easy as 7 to use now.  It does boot fast.


Edited by leonicholson, 04 April 2015 - 03:24 PM.


#7 dc3

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 05:16 PM

If you recently upgraded to Windows 8.1 you will have a lot of updates.  I would do those before considering creating a recovery disc.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 leonicholson

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 06:48 PM

If you recently upgraded to Windows 8.1 you will have a lot of updates.  I would do those before considering creating a recovery disc.

 

I know.  Have done many, many updates, but seem to be caught up.  Just getting ready for Windows 10.  It is 32bit, as I have some software that doesn't like compatibility in 64bit.  No compatibility problems so far and no learning curve with the Classic Shell.


Edited by leonicholson, 04 April 2015 - 06:50 PM.


#9 dc3

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 09:44 AM

Last week I had to reinstall Windows 8, there were 127 updates after that.  I then upgraded to Windows 8.1 and have had at least a couple of updates each day since.  Once you reach the point where the updates are current I would suggest transferring recovery image to a flash drive or a DVD.  You could do both if you wish to be truly redundant.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 rp88

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 10:46 AM

Whilst you're at this, amke a system image also. Windows 8.1 cotains the facility to do it hidden under control panel-->file history. There is a good guide on making them here (go down to step 3). A system image of your machine in a good state, with the programs you like, a working antivirus, no problem updates, no infections... is a very valuable thing to have around, your first choice if you ever need recover the system to an older state. It will let you be back to a working state in hours rather than the days needed if you were to fully reinstall windows.

Edited by rp88, 07 April 2015 - 10:46 AM.

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My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#11 dicke

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 01:25 PM

pr88

 

Amen !


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#12 leonicholson

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Posted 10 April 2015 - 01:27 PM

Given the size of a system image, is it possible to create an iso file for storage on a backup drive and "burn" it onto a dvd or flash drive if needed later?



#13 rp88

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 09:00 AM

I don't think so with windows' intrnal image making tool. System images won't fit on one dvd, they are too large but you can burn them to multiple discs. My advice is to get a small external HDD you can or a high capacity USB drive (in either case the device must label itself as a "local disk" when you plug it in, NOT a "removable disk" ) and write the image to that. Window's image making tool takes you through all the steps. The smallest system image you are likely to ever have is about 40Gb for a system with very few programs installed, very few files, very few temp files lying around and no bloatware. A working system with programs installed and files on it will have a larger image, perhaps over 100Gb for a system with a lot on it. I don't think there is any way to take an ISO of the image, easiest just to make it on a USB or HDD ("local" not "removable" disk) and have it ready for use as soon as needed.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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