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Full System Recovery Then Rebooting And Rebooting And Rebooting.....


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#1 MollyBaloney

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 10:26 PM

Hi,
I have my daughter's computer here, trying to fix it. She's a single mom with not much money so she has no way of taking it in and having it fixed. It started shutting down with a blue screen with a bunch of writing on it that shut down too fast to read. I caught page fault and memory dump. I tried to restore to an earlier date, but it wouldn't do it. I tried a system recovery, and it still did it. I did a full system restore and now after it installs...when it goes to reboot...it goes to the boot options i.e. safe mode, last known good configuration, etc. It does it over and over. Sometimes that blue screen with all the writing will pop up before it reboots. Any suggestions, short of shooting it and burying it, would be much appreciated. She was so excited that her sister gave her the computer and now this!

Thanks,
Molly :thumbsup:

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#2 Herk

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 11:32 PM

Without being able to see the error message, it's hard to tell. But I'd guess it's one of two things: either the hard drive is too full or a piece of hardware, such as a drive or sound card or something, has failed. If the hard drive is too full and there isn't enough RAM to load Windows into, it tries to swap some data over to the hard drive, but being no room, it simply shuts down and dumps the memory. There are things that can possibly be done for this, but more info is needed. If you have upgraded Windows from an earlier version, and the system is a FAT 32 system, you can get in and delete files with a Windows boot disk, such as from Windows 98. Sometimes, you can start the system with something like Ultimate Boot Disk, which uses a scaled-down Linux operating system, and then use included tools to delete or move files.

If a device has failed, the only way to troubleshoot it is to remove devices. If you get lucky, you can find the bad one.

When you restored Windows, I'm guessing you did an over-the-top reinstall, and didn't lose any data, is that right? Or did you do a complete wipe and restore?

#3 MollyBaloney

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:01 AM

I totally wiped it clean and then reinstalled from the partition...

It started doing it quite a while ago...it went from doing it once in a while to increasingly more..until it started doing it as soon as the computer booted in. After i did the reinstall, it won't even go to the screen that says it is preparing to start...

Molly

#4 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 11:16 AM

Blue screens are often called 'Blue Screens of Death' (or BSOD) by users, and 'Stop Messages' by Microsoft. We need to know the exact message you see when you get the blue screen. We especially are looking for a set of letters and numbers about half way down the page that take this format:

0x0000008e

This is usually followed by a set of 4 simliar numbers in parenthasis. For now we just need the first set of letter and numbers (before the numbers in the parenthasis).

This will help you diagnose why you are getting the stop messages. Of course, anything else the message says will help diagnose it's cause also.

If your computer only flashes the blue screen for a split second and then reboots go to:

Start > right click on My Computer > Properties > Advanced tab > Startup and Recovery Settings

Uncheck Automatically Restart

Click Apply and then OK

Now when you receive a blue screen the computer will pause on it and you will have time to write down the message. You will have to reboot manually.
ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
I'M SO SMART IT'S SCARY!


Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!


#5 MollyBaloney

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 08:40 AM

I wiped the computer clean, and restored from the partition...I can't get windows to start at all now. it will restore, and then instead of going to the last blue screen that says "please wait while windows continues to start", it goes to the screen that gives you the options of how to start as in "safe mode", safe mode with networking, start with last known configuration, start normally. No matter which I choose it will restart and go back to that screen over and over.....

I tried restoring it three times.

I don't know what hardware to disconnect to see if something is wrong with it.

Thanks,
Molly

#6 Herk

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 11:21 AM

The recommended procedure for this is to disconnect everything that isn't necessary - CD drives, external USB devices, sound card, and so on, and just try booting minimally. But I usually go the opposite route: disconnect a CD and try it, Disconnect a sound card and try it, remove one stick of memory and try it, and so on, replugging the device if it didn't make any difference.

If you do get inside your computer, remember to follow basic electronic safety procedure: touch metal to ground yourself to remove static electricity and/or wear a wrist strap to prevent damage to sensitive parts; and unplug the machine. (It can be a good idea to leave the machine plugged in before you touch metal because a properly-grounded outlet has a grounding line that the case is grounded to. But then unplug the machine before proceeding.) It only takes 30 volts to damage electronic parts and the human body can typically transfer 30,000 volts. Don't shuffle across the carpet. :-)




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