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How to change the distro? [Ubuntu ---> Fedora]


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#1 Cybbermouse

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 01:54 PM

I guess it's a silly question because there aren't any guides about it. I installed Ubuntu 14.10 a few weeks ago as my first Linux and it really sucks. There're a lot of people who think like me. So I want to install the latest version of Fedora from pendrive. But how to boot it? Unetbootin (it's a software) doesn't work. Everywhere is how to install [Windows --> Ubuntu]. But I need a guide that will tell me how to install [Ubuntu ---> Fedora]. Of course it isn't important if it'll be [Ubuntu --->Debian] or [Mandriva -->Mint]. I need the basic information : how to? Because I can't boot the pendrive.



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#2 buddy215

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 03:28 PM

If you have access to an installed Windows OS then you can use Universal USB Installer – Easy as 1 2 3 | USB Pen Drive Linux.

The few times I used the installer it worked just fine for creating Live as well as Persistent bootable distros on flash drives.

 

Never tried Fedora so can't help you with any problem that keeps Fedora from booting once the Live is installed on a flash drive.


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#3 1002 Richard S

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 03:36 PM

Hi,

What problems are you having with Unetbootin? What error messages is it giving you?



#4 shadow-warrior

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 05:04 PM

Unetbooting isn't always the best option....i know it used to work from windows but I have heard a lot of problems  inter Linux distros......

 

I believe Ubuntiu has a reasonably good 1 in a standard install  called something like "Disc Creator" and another is mkusb in the PPAs... Mint has "Usb imgwriter"

 

Research Fedora well before Installing it..it is a little different from Ubuntu....they do generally use newer software..though that can be more risky...it also doesnt offer much help if you need Propriety software..like graphics cards.etc..  Fedora is usually very stable...



#5 Cybbermouse

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 05:16 PM

I don't have acess to an installed Windows.

Problem with Unetbootin : http://scr.hu/6315/hgze3 - Linux can't read (open) this file.


Edited by Cybbermouse, 27 March 2015 - 05:38 PM.


#6 NickAu

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 06:16 PM

Problem with Unetbootin : http://scr.hu/6315/hgze3 - Linux can't read (open) this file.

 

 

Where did you get that?

 

Try installing unetbootin this way, Open terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install unetbootin 


#7 paul88ks

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 08:54 PM

Some computers won't let you boot from a pendrive (USB).Mine won't! Can you download an .ISO and burn it to a DVD?



#8 shadow-warrior

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 10:00 PM

You may also have issues with UEFI

https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/02/04/more-on-booting-a-practical-fedora-uefi-guide-and-dont-use-universal-usb-stick-writers/

 

 Here is some details on installing

taken from this page

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface

 

 

 

UEFI and BIOS bootability of Fedora media

Here are some general considerations related to which modes a given Fedora medium (CD, DVD, USB stick) will be bootable in.

  • Pretty much any Fedora medium of any kind should always be BIOS-bootable.
  • Any Fedora image correctly written to a disc (not a USB stick) should be UEFI-bootable.
  • A Fedora USB stick written with one of the direct write methods described at How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB#quickstarts should be UEFI-bootable.
  • A Fedora USB stick written with livecd-iso-to-disk --format --reset-mbr --efi should be UEFI-bootable: for more details, seeHow_to_create_and_use_Live_USB#litd.
  • A Fedora USB stick written with How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB#luc ought to be UEFI-bootable in many cases, but this method is not as reliable as direct write or livecd-iso-to-disk, and can depend on the format of the stick prior to running the tool.
  • A Fedora USB stick written with any other method, including third-party utilities such as UNetbootin, is quite likely to not be UEFI-bootable. If you wish to do a UEFI-native installation, are using a USB stick as your medium, and cannot persuade it to boot in UEFI-native mode, you may need to check How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB for instructions on writing a reliably UEFI-bootable USB stick.

 

I was looking for Details on using the "dd" method 

 

 

Unetbootin

If you're using UEFI, do not currently use Unetbootin with Debian iso files due to a bug.

Install Unetbootin from the repositories

sudo apt-get install unetbootin

Start it, select an ISO file or a distribution to download, select a target drive (USB drive or Hard Disk), select persistence if you wish, then reboot once done. If your USB drive doesn't show up, reformat it as FAT32.

See this detailed description.

 

mkusb - dd image of iso file to USB device safely

 

Simple, safe, high success rate

The mkusb tool was developed to make it simpler and safer to create boot drives with the method to flash or clone an iso image or a compressed image file. It is using dd under the hood.The target is a mass storage device, often but not always a USB drive, sometimes an internal drive or an eSATA drive.

Cloning an iso file to a mass storage device makes a boot drive, provided it is a hybrid iso file, post-processed with isohybrid. See

 

man isohybrid

This method with dd has a high success rate.

[This is the situation now with the new Ubuntu 14.10 version] mkusb is particularly good for pre-release testing and new releases, when the standard tools like Startup Disk Creator might not be ready (if the configuration of the booting has been changed since the previous release).

 

Quick start manual and mkusb PPA

The fastest way to start making USB boot drives is to install the mkusb PPA, install and update the mkusb package like all the other program packages. See this link

https://launchpad.net/~mkusb/+archive/ubuntu/ppa

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/ppa # and press Enter
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mkusb

You can download the quick start manual and check the md5sums at this link http://phillw.net/isos/linux-tools/mkusb/

 

mkusb - wiki page

mkusb is described with more details at the following wiki page

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/mkusb

 

 

 

some may be of use..



#9 Al1000

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 07:05 AM

Some computers won't let you boot from a pendrive (USB).Mine won't!

I didn't think that mine would either, until I found out how.

Plug in the bootable USB, and go into the BIOS. If there is no option to boot from USB in the boot menu, have a look in the hard drive menu and see if the USB shows up there. If it's there, select it then save and exit BIOS.

Now the computer should boot from the USB. This works on one of my computers, but not on the other, but it's worth a shot if you haven't tried it before.

(To subsequently boot from the hard drive, just remove the USB before the next time you boot up and the BIOS should automatically return the hard drive menu to what it was before, as it will no longer detect the USB - at least that's what happens on my computer)

#10 heyyou325

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 09:07 AM

I have an older desktop that has no listing in the bios to boot from usb.  That said if I looked hard enough I probably could find a way.   There is nothing wrong with using a dvd, and fedora will boot  either uefi, or regular bios, as I have installed it on 2 different machines.  It does take up a lot of space on the hard drive.  It squeezed into 12 gb barely on a newer uefi machine, but took up almost 20 gb, if I remember right 16.? on my old 32 bit machine.  It is different, I'm told it's more for businesses, red hat fedora.  It was also slower than mot of the buntus.  I would say check out your bios when your machine starts and see how it is set up.  How did you install ubuntu?  You should definitely run it off a live disk, or usb before installing it.  Also make sure the iso file you downloaded is correct by checking sha or md5.  The web site you downloaded it from should show what it should be, and you can either install programs from ubuntu repository (giso file I've used), or check it from your terminal.  Possibly you can redownload it using firefox and an app download them all.  (See Cat, I can learn.)  Shadow warrior's post above has some very good info in it.  Personally, I've liked the distros based on ubuntu 14.04, or open suse, but we are each different in what we want, and it's good to try a few to know which works best for you.  Good luck and have fun with whatever you decide.


Edited by heyyou325, 28 March 2015 - 09:09 AM.


#11 shadow-warrior

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 10:04 AM

I Used Fedora for a while many years back ..more down to the fact I was using RedHat and had some keeping it all under the same roof idea......I did have issues with WiFi drivers and AMD graphics..as i needed propriety ones and the free ones really didn't work..and got little help from the support forums..  

 

I Did however really enjoy the much missed Fuduntu.  (Fedora Based).which was a real pleasure to use.. and as of yet had no real issues with Korora...though i haven't done much more than install it....

 

If I wanted to change to another top 10 distro for ease of use..  I would probably go for OpenSuse.....I think I still have a pc with it on in another country..and it is a bit boring as it has always done everything right with no issues ...



#12 heyyou325

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 10:44 AM

They may have fixed their wifi issues.  It was about a year ago I had it, and didn't have any on my laptop.  my desktop doesn't have it, it's hardwired.  I'm not sure why it installed as much as it did, over 16gb on install, I think that is why it was so slow to do anything.  The 64 bit I had on my laptop wasn't that bad.  Once I got open suse installed, the first 2 downloads worked fine live, installed fine, but wouldn't restart to finish the install.  It's still on my laptop, and might stay there.  And like you, no issues in about 6 months.  But cybbermouse needs to try and decide for herself as we did.  I am thinking she probably has a uefi computer and not able to use unetbootin.  

 

 

  • A Fedora USB stick written with any other method, including third-party utilities such as UNetbootin, is quite likely to not be UEFI-bootable. If you wish to do a UEFI-native installation, are using a USB stick as your medium, and cannot persuade it to boot in UEFI-native mode, you may need to check How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB for instructions on writing a reliably UEFI-bootable USB stick.

With uefi, I couldn't even boot any distro live unless it had a key. 



#13 marcoose777

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 05:21 PM

Good luck with fedora, if you're new to linux you might find yourself a bit out of your depth. The SE policies can get in the way quite a bit. However it's state of the art otherwise. Hope your PC's upto it. =D Regards - an Archlinux user

 

PS - You could try dd, mkfs.msdos, and gparted from the command line. Not forgetting to enable the boot(able) flag and changing the BIOS boot order to look at USB first. UEFI secure boot mode will probably be out of the question tho'


Edited by marcoose777, 28 March 2015 - 05:33 PM.


#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 01:14 AM

Cybbermouse, hi.

 

Is it Fedora 21 you are talking about, or other?

 

32-bit or 64-bit?

 

If you take a look at my signature below, and at my Profile though my Avatar - you could "flesh out" your details a little (without compromising privacy), this then travels with you everywhere around the site, and we can more easily assess the environment you are working under - keep the details current.

 

Once you are INTO a Linux Distro, as opposed to installing, if you have problems, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you are not sure about how to post a Screenshot at this site, read Moderator Stolen's excellent Post here, or else read NickAu's Pinned Topic at the front page to Linux and Unix.

 

Hope we can help

 

:wizardball: Wizard

Edited typo


Edited by wizardfromoz, 04 April 2015 - 01:15 AM.


#15 wizardfromoz

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 01:23 AM

I beg your pardon

 

 

or else read NickAu's Pinned Topic at the front page to Linux and Unix.

 

... that Topic appears to have been removed, or gone elsewhere, so go with the Post in the Topic I hyperlinked.

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wiz






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