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Upgrading advice...


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#1 ERDOC

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:23 AM

New to forum - thanks for your help in advance.  I'm an ER Doctor; can stop a heart attack, but may get shocked to death by my own computer... 

 

Opened the tower to find what was buzzing - thought it was the HD (so bought a 2TB one), only to find it's the video card fan buzzing loudly.  So, I need to replace it because it's buzzing and also because it's 5 yrs old and sucks for games.  My question is, what will my rig handle appropriately, and do I need to upgrade other parts so it will play games decently (don't care enough to go into overclocking, etc... just want to be able to play new games like Alien, COD:  AW, etc).

 

Thanks to the powerful computer brains out there!

 

Here's my rig info:

 

 

Computer Model
Studio XPS 9100
BIOS Vendor
Dell Computer Corporation
BIOS Version
DELL - 20101021
BIOS Date
10/21/2010
OS Version
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium

 

 
Manufacturer
Intel® Core™ i7 CPU 960 @ 3.20GHz
Clock Speed
3.2Ghz
L2 Cache Size
1024
 
Available Memory
79.43 %
Page File Size
24,556.0MB
Available Page File
93.46 %
Virtual Memory
24,556.0MB
Available Virtual Memory
86.71 %
DIMM0
2,048.0MB
DIMM1
2,048.0MB
DIMM2
2,048.0MB
DIMM3
2,048.0MB
DIMM4
2,048.0MB
DIMM5
2,048.0MB
 
Adaptor
Description
Adaptor
Description
 
Drive
C:
Type
3
Drive Size
1,849.7GB
Total Available Space
740.1GB
Used Space
1,109.6GB
Drive
D:
Type
5
Drive Size
 
Total Available Space
 
Used Space
 
 
Type
Description
DVD/CD-ROM Drives
HL-DT-ST DVDRWBD CH20N
Disk Drives
ST32000641AS
Display Adapters
AMD Radeon HD 6600 Series
IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers
Intel® ICH10R SATA AHCI Controller
Keyboards,Mice & Pointing Devices
HID-compliant mouse
HID-compliant mouse
USB Input Device
Monitors
Generic PnP Monitor
Sound Devices
AMD High Definition Audio Device
Realtek High Definition Audio
USB Controllers
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A38
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A39
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Enhanced Host Controller - 3A3A
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Enhanced Host Controller - 3A3C
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A34
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A35
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A36
Intel® ICH10 Family USB Universal Host Controller - 3A37

 



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#2 ERDOC

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 02:00 PM

Also, I have a 64gb SSD that I've never installed into anything; a new 2TB 7200 HD, and a 750w aftermarket power supply, as well as a few older misc parts that are probably outdated.



#3 YeahBleeping

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:19 PM

The 750TI is pretty much the decidedly best bang for the buck video card and should do you nicely.  You may need to install that power supply since you did not state how many watts your current one is I cannot advise on that.  But the video card should do well for you.  You should also download display driver uninstaller and run it prior to installing your new video card.  Coose uninstall and shut down.  Then install your new video card.  Download the newest drivers from Nvidia.  About the SSD although it would greatly increase load times for your OS it is rather small so I think you would run out of room for updates and frequently used programs so I would try to go for a 200+ GB SSD if you want that.


Edited by YeahBleeping, 20 March 2015 - 03:23 PM.


#4 Serpius

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:48 PM



Also, I have a 64gb SSD that I've never installed into anything; a new 2TB 7200 HD, and a 750w aftermarket power supply, as well as a few older misc parts that are probably outdated.

 

ER Doc,

 

Swapping out computer components of by itself is not complicated, however, you must take certain precautions to prevent ESD (electrical static discharge) from frying your computer components (new or old). 

 

First, go to the computer store and by yourself one of those ESD straps. Usually most are less than $10.

Second, never, ever, work on carpeted surfaces when you are dealing with the insides of the computer. Your kitchen table or hardwood floor will suffice.

 

Swap ONE component at a time. Do not attempt to remove all components at once and they try to replace those back. Unless you have built over 1,000 computers like I have, this is the best method for someone who is inexperienced in computer component replacements. 

 

This means... when you decide to replace that old power supply unit (PSU)... strap on that ESD strap, put the other end (the clip) to the computer case frame... usually on the bottom so that the strap cord doesn't get in the way.

 

Next, unplug the power cord that goes from the wall outlet to the power supply unit.

Yea, I know that should be fairly obvious, but trust me, I've seen clients that did not do that... they ended frying their computer because they left the power cord plugged in. Also, it's dangerous, too!!

 

Then... unplug all of the power plugs from each device that the power supply unit cabling is connected to... including the ones that are plugged into the motherboard, if necessary. Be mindful of each plug and where it goes. When you take out the old PSU and replace it with the new PSU, then reverse what you have just done with the old PSU. Make sure that ALL devices are plugged in, including any cabling that goes onto the motherboard, if necessary.

 

With all of the other components that you are planning to upgrade, the concept is the same... take your time and do not rush it. I have seen far too many screw-ups by clients who *thought* they knew what they were doing only to find out that was not the case.

 

Oh... just for the record... it would have not been necessary for you to put in all of the computer specs like you did in the 1st post.

 

All you had to do was give us the Service Tag number and we would have gotten all of the information from Dell's Support website.

 

Here's my suggested video card upgrade that should help you.

 

 
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Superclocked Video Card  ($139.99 @ Amazon) 
Total: $139.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-03-20 21:45 EDT-0400
 
If you have any questions, please reply back in this thread!


#5 ERDOC

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:53 PM

Perfect, thanks everyone!  Exactly what I needed...



#6 YeahBleeping

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 09:45 PM

+1 to Serpus's suggestions






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