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Advice on Upgrading Please


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#1 joebeaven

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 06:22 AM

Hi,

 

My computer is still very slow despite following the various steps suggested to me on this forum, so I've decided I need to upgrade my hardware. I'm currently using Windows 7 Ultimate and the following hardware:

 

PSU - Seasonic SS-500HT Active PFC F3
Processor - Intel Q8300 Core 2 Quad (2.50GHz/4M/1333/05A/Socket: 775)
Motherboard - ASRock G31M-GS R2.0
Graphics Card - VTX3D Radeon HD5450 1GB PCIe DVI HDMI 2GB
Audio Card - Asus Xonar DS
Wireless LAN Card - Edimax EW-7128G 802.11 g
Optical Drive - Sony AD-7240S-0B 24x Internal DVDRWRAM SATA Black Bare 
Hard Drive 1 - 1TB Western Digital Caviar Black 
Hard Drive 2 - 3TB Western Digital Caviar Green
Hard Drive 3 - 2TB Seagate Barracuda
RAM - Kingston 2 x 2GB PC2-5300 DDR 667 240Pin
USB 3.0 PCI-E Card - Orico PVU3-5O2U
Monitor - Cibox LW1922C
Router - Technicolor TG58n Pro
 
I work from home and mostly use Internet browsers and Microsoft Office. I would like to do more video editing which my current system struggles with. I don't play games.
 
I I'd like to just upgrade my motherboard, processor and RAM if possible, but I understand I may have to change other parts if they're not compatible.
 
I live in the UK and my budget is about £400 ($590 US).
 
Advice would be much appreciated.
 
Thanks,
Joe


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#2 Serpius

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:13 AM



 

Hi,

 

My computer is still very slow despite following the various steps suggested to me on this forum, so I've decided I need to upgrade my hardware. I'm currently using Windows 7 Ultimate and the following hardware:

 

** Rest of post deleted for brevity **
 
I live in the UK and my budget is about £400 ($590 US).
 
Advice would be much appreciated.
 
Thanks,
Joe

 

Joe,

 

Here is my recommended upgrades. 

 

I am assuming that all of your hard drives are SATA, if so, then you are in good shape there!

 

You can re-use the Orico PVU3-5O2U adapter.

I do not think you can re-use the Asus audio card, but you won't need to because it does come with a great built-in sound controller.

You can't re-use the Wi-Fi adapter, but the motherboard does come with a wired LAN port.

If you still need a Wi-Fi adapter, you probably can get a good cheap one locally.

I have upgraded the computer case, plus added a nice highly rated power supply unit. 

This motherboard will enable you to upgrade to a more powerful processor such as the i5 4690k or the i7 4790k in the future if needed. You can also upgrade the RAM up to 32 GB maximum.

The processor that I chose has hyperthreading, that will enable you to get the most out of the processor without having to spend a ton of money now.

 

 
Motherboard: MSI Z97 PC MATE ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  (£63.56 @ Scan.co.uk) 
Memory: Team Vulcan 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  (£48.90 @ Overclockers.co.uk) 
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB WINDFORCE Video Card  (£108.96 @ Amazon UK) 
Power Supply: XFX TS 550W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply  (£54.49 @ Amazon UK) 
Total: £409.04
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-03-20 16:05 GMT+0000


#3 joebeaven

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 02:48 PM

Thank you very much for the advice, Serpius. I've gone ahead and ordered what you suggested. I thought about it and decided I could stretch to the i7 4790k which should make it quite a bit faster.



#4 YeahBleeping

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:14 PM

Also if you can splurge for a reasonably sized SSD for the OS drive you will increase the speed and loading of windows.



#5 Serpius

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:39 PM

Thank you very much for the advice, Serpius. I've gone ahead and ordered what you suggested. I thought about it and decided I could stretch to the i7 4790k which should make it quite a bit faster.

 

Joe,

 

You're quite welcome!

 

Yea, that i7 4790k processor is a beast! You'll love the speed along with the new upgraded components.

 

You'll probably have someone suggest to you that you should get a solid state drive (SSD) for the operating system loadup.

 

There are pros and cons to getting a SSD. For myself, I am not totally sold on SSDs at this point largely due to SSDs vulnerability to electrical power fluctuations. One can lose a lot of data if it's stored on that SSD that failed due to some issue with your electrical power.

 

Here's an article by PC Mag that may help you to decide.

 

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404258,00.asp 

 

I do not feel that if you got a SSD device, saving that 10 to 15 seconds of bootup time can be justifiable in terms of cost and SSD's lack of reliability to save data.

 

Just m 3 cents...



#6 YeahBleeping

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 06:54 PM

Thanks Serpius for bringing up a good point about SSD's But I do not feel they are any more or less ' prone ' to problems than a regular mechanical drive.  Moving parts/friction mechanical issues are just as possible for failure as an SSD.  I have been running on a 256GB Samsung drive for almost 3 years now.  And I have had zero problems.  I think Hard drives companies should be a little worried and come up with their own SSD solutions as many of them already have.  I still think there is a place for Regular hard drives in the industry as the price per gig so to speak is won by mechanical drives.  But I don't believe any of the ' scare tactics' of catastrophic failure (and yes I've had power outtages) that really messed up an update that was happening at the time.  But a hard drive will have just as many issues with that as will an SSD.  The sheer speed of an SSD in EVERYTHING not just windows.  ALL my programs on my SSD load much faster than my older build that my son uses.  It may seem like nothing to an average user.  But in my case I enjoy having the speed my system provides that a hard drive is simply incapable of at this time.



#7 Serpius

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 07:37 PM

Thanks Serpius for bringing up a good point about SSD's But I do not feel they are any more or less ' prone ' to problems than a regular mechanical drive.  Moving parts/friction mechanical issues are just as possible for failure as an SSD.  I have been running on a 256GB Samsung drive for almost 3 years now.  And I have had zero problems.  I think Hard drives companies should be a little worried and come up with their own SSD solutions as many of them already have.  I still think there is a place for Regular hard drives in the industry as the price per gig so to speak is won by mechanical drives.  But I don't believe any of the ' scare tactics' of catastrophic failure (and yes I've had power outtages) that really messed up an update that was happening at the time.  But a hard drive will have just as many issues with that as will an SSD.  The sheer speed of an SSD in EVERYTHING not just windows.  ALL my programs on my SSD load much faster than my older build that my son uses.  It may seem like nothing to an average user.  But in my case I enjoy having the speed my system provides that a hard drive is simply incapable of at this time.

 

YeahBleeping,

 

When I look at a client's situation and evaluate their needs, wants, and budget constraints, those are the 3 top driving factors in making a computer build for them.

 

Actually, I should reverse that order... meeting budget constraints first... then needs and wants. 

 

So, I looked at Joe's situation... his budget was limited to 400 UK pounds, that alone will almost throw out the possibility of a SSD drive into the build due to the cost. 

 

As you saw what Joe decided to do after he saw my build suggestion, he had enough money to get an i7 processor.

Had I thrown in a SSD in the build in the 1st place, it would have added to the cost of my suggested build, which in turn, may have prevented Joe from thinking about getting that i7 processor.

 

In the end, it is the user, (in this case Joe) that made the decision to adjust the build to get that i7 processor. Not me.

I gave him options to consider about the build for future upgrades. Joe decided to make the jump now. 

 

Now, if Joe had a budget of around 1,000 UK pounds, then yes, I would have added a 256 GB SSD drive because there's enough room in the budget. I rarely go above 256 GB SSD because that's all the room you need for an operating system software and a few other basic software installs, then after that, the other HDDs basically take over the everyday computing needs for that user. Even the upcoming Win 10, it does not require more space on the storage drive than the Win 8.1 install does.

 

Besides that, Joe already had 3 HDDs and he doesn't need anymore storage space at the moment, because he did not mention about running out of storage space.

 

If speed was Joe's number one priority, then I would have suggested a 500 GB 10,000 HDD instead of SSD and he would get almost double the storage space for about the same amount of money.

 

Just my 3 cents...



#8 YeahBleeping

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:00 PM

Hello - Serpius- and You are right. I certainly did not intend to come across as ' trying to get Joe to buy anything he may not be able to afford.  And I value your opinion as I stated.  I was simply trying to refute the SSD's are possibly prone to more issues than a regular hard drive and I certainly did not intend to cause irrational advice as to my suggestion.  Hence the ' splurge ' part.  While I agree that SSD's are certainly not cheap, I do stand by the fact that they increase system performance to a degree that Hard drives are currently incapable of. 

 

Hope I wasn't misunderstood- Yeah~



#9 Serpius

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:14 PM

Hello - Serpius- and You are right. I certainly did not intend to come across as ' trying to get Joe to buy anything he may not be able to afford.  And I value your opinion as I stated.  I was simply trying to refute the SSD's are possibly prone to more issues than a regular hard drive and I certainly did not intend to cause irrational advice as to my suggestion.  Hence the ' splurge ' part.  While I agree that SSD's are certainly not cheap, I do stand by the fact that they increase system performance to a degree that Hard drives are currently incapable of. 

 

Hope I wasn't misunderstood- Yeah~

 

YeahBleeping,

 

No misunderstanding here. 

 

I never disputed that SSDs are indeed faster in terms of bootup times because the SSDs are faster, no question. 

 

What I always have to look at is the "big picture" for the client. Most of my clients fall into Joe's category. They want a faster computer, but are not gamers or heavy computer users. Nor are they light computers that my father might be. My father uses his computer for his emails, check his bank account info and play a few simple online games such as Solitaire.

 

When I read Joe's posting... it looked like he was someone in between heavy and light computer user.

 

Now, for some computer geeks like ourselves, yea, we can put in a SSD as our bootup drive because we can justify the need for one. Personally, I don't have one only because I never saw a great need for one. Maybe in the future, I might.

 

I'm a heavy computer user, but not a speed demon, I don't play those high end games, but I do a lot of graphical and image rendering that takes a good load on the computer. Just look at the specs in my signature block. I did not include the specs for my server downstairs. 



#10 joebeaven

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 02:11 AM

That's all very interesting. I bought my Western Digital Caviar Black recently and it was quite expensive, so I don't want to change it yet. I didn't know about SSDs at the time, but I'll get one next time I need a new C Drive.



#11 Serpius

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 07:27 AM

That's all very interesting. I bought my Western Digital Caviar Black recently and it was quite expensive, so I don't want to change it yet. I didn't know about SSDs at the time, but I'll get one next time I need a new C Drive.

 

Joe,

 

Western Digital hard drives (HDDs) have a much lower failure rate than Seagate HDDs do.

 

WD Caviar series are separated by the Green, Blue and Black versions and all are running at 7200 RPM.

Any branded 7200 RPM HDDs will be more costly then any branded 5400 RPM HDDs.

 

You unknowingly ended buying the better color of the 3 versions! For real!

 

All tech specifications point to WD Caviar Black HDD as being slightly better than WD Caviar Blue HDD,

then WD Caviar Blue HDD being slightly better than WD Caviar Green HDD.

 

That's the reason why WD Caviar Black HDD is pricier than the other Caviar HDD versions.

 

Don't misunderstand me! It does not mean that the WD Caviar Green HDD nor is the WD Caviar Blue HDD are bad HDDs,

they are not!

 

In fact WD Caviar Green HDD is better rated than a lot of the Seagate HDDs of the same storage specifications.

 

Just for your info...



#12 illestrate

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 07:05 AM

I would definitely recommend SSDs, their way faster and anything written on that flash disk will load up faster.  My boot times dropped to like 8 seconds.  Games even load up faster like Rome 2 Total War when I am loading maps!  File explorer loads up quick, google chrome instantaneously their are so many benefits of SSD.  The greatest thing today is how much affordable they are getting.  They are also way more reliable than mechanical drives with a less failure rate and longer life.  Mechanical drives are ALWAYS gonna fail regardless of brand and price they are just made that way with mechanically moving parts.  SSD is honestly gonna be the future and the best part about it you can carry this "New" technology with you to another build if you choose to.  Side note if you were gonna get a SATA III SSD make sure you have the SATA 6Gbps interface on your mobo to take full advantage of the higher speeds.  Even if you do have a Sata II controller it will still be considerably faster than Mechanical drives.  It's one of the fastest upgrades in terms of speed that you'll notice all around.


Edited by illestrate, 24 March 2015 - 07:06 AM.





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